Public radio – Colin Marshall Radio http://colinmarshallradio.com/ Tue, 17 May 2022 00:03:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://colinmarshallradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-1-1-120x120.png Public radio – Colin Marshall Radio http://colinmarshallradio.com/ 32 32 Chesterfield Library goes viral on TikTok https://colinmarshallradio.com/chesterfield-library-goes-viral-on-tiktok/ Tue, 17 May 2022 00:03:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/chesterfield-library-goes-viral-on-tiktok/ This story was originally produced by the Keene Sentinel. NHPR is republishing it in partnership with the Granite State News Collaborative. It’s not often you see your local library in the digital spotlight. But when Chesterfield Public Library posted a video on TikTok, the popular video-sharing app, on March 28, the small rural library got […]]]>

This story was originally produced by the Keene Sentinel. NHPR is republishing it in partnership with the Granite State News Collaborative.

It’s not often you see your local library in the digital spotlight. But when Chesterfield Public Library posted a video on TikTok, the popular video-sharing app, on March 28, the small rural library got its shot at internet fame, gaining more than a million views in a few hours.

The viral video shows library assistant Lucy Applegate holding a DVD copy of the animated film “Inside Out” and uses an audio clip from the cartoon “Owl House” to joke that even though the film was released seven years ago years old, some of the library’s younger patrons might consider it “old”.

From Friday, the video had amassed over 3.1 million views, over 707,000 likes and 8,233 comments.

Even before the pandemic, libraries across the country were using the internet to try to engage with their young audiences. Now, many libraries are using social media platforms, such as TikTok, to boost their outreach efforts.

The idea of ​​Chesterfield Public Library having a presence on the platform was not new.

“I had been thinking about creating an account for some time,” said Kathleen Packard, director of the library.

But it wasn’t until Packard attended a professional development workshop, “Leveraging Social Media for Your Brand,” earlier this year at the Hudson Public Library, that the idea came to life. Chesterfield Library was interested in exploring different ways to reach young patrons, particularly college students to young adults.

The workshop “had a strong focus on how to use TikTok as a platform for libraries to engage with younger audiences, which is what we were looking for,” Packard said. “So we were like, ‘Why not? We’ll try that; We are going to go there.'”

The library created an account on March 1 and posted its first TikTok the next day. The content started with a presentation of staff members, with images from around the building, before developing following the latest trends on the platform as a way to promote events at the library. The account, @chesterfieldlibraryhad 3,560 subscribers as of Friday.

Courtesy

/

Chesterfield Library on TikTok

A screenshot of the viral TikTok featuring and created by Chesterfield Library Assistant Lucy Applegate. Posted on March 28, it gained 3.1 million views.

“While we use it primarily to promote the book exhibits and programming we have at the library, we often mix in some book humor here and there,” said Applegate, 20, the assistant of the library that created the Owl House video.

“We’re going to look at what’s trending, so different songs or filters on TikTok, which can change quite frequently,” said Packard, who gives Applegate ideas before giving them complete creative freedom in the filming process and disassembly. “We ask ourselves, ‘How can I take this fun trend, in general, and make it specific to the library? How can you make it funny and relevant? »

Applegate was initially hesitant about the library creating a TikTok account.

“It was like a big leap for us at the start,” they said. “We didn’t have a big presence to begin with, so we didn’t have a base for our image that we could build on for social media.”

They first relied on what other libraries were doing on TikTok, watching other videos, and researching engagement strategies on various platforms.

However, having a library account on TikTok has its advantages.

“Libraries themselves are different entities on social media, so we can have a bit more freedom in the content we create than celebrities or influencers,” Applegate explained. “There’s a great community within TikTok among other libraries. It helps stimulate content ideas, and we just support each other.

One of the ideas they had was when the North Riverside Public Library in Illinois released a video, after they hid a photo of Robert Pattinson, one of the actors who starred in the movies based on the series of books, behind the Twilight shelf in the library collection. .

“I saw this video and just had to recreate it,” Applegate said, who then responded to the video on the platform with their own Pattinson addition in the Chesterfield Library. “It was so much fun and looked like something our customers would enjoy.”

As in any online community, there are those who interact consistently with the content in the library.

“I’ve started identifying usernames that comment often, like our videos a lot, and that can really mean two things: Either those people are local and are frequent customers, or they’re people who can be hundreds of miles away and may never make it into our library,” Applegate said. “Anyway, these are people who derive joy from the content that I create, which is really cool .”

The library has had other popular videos since then, including one promote games for college students during the April holidays which now has over 3,000 views.

“It was only meant to be a trial, we only planned to test it for three months,” Packard said of using TikTok as an engagement tool. “But thanks to this video and given the impact it had, we decided to make TikTok a permanent tool as part of our awareness campaign.”

The library has an iPad dedicated to creating content for its TikTok account and other marketing software designed for libraries, but Packard points out that it’s not a big financial burden for libraries to try this type. awareness.

“As long as you have a plan, really, there is no loss. That’s the beautiful thing about social media; you can just try things out and see what happens.

Keene Public Library has also experienced the power social media can have in exposing patrons to new material and promoting its collections. “Recently there has been an increase in cases of older books [classics] thanks to a recent trend in the BookTok community,” said Jay Fee, Keene’s Teen Services Librarian.

#BookTok, a hashtag used by creators on TikTok that features book recommendations, reviews, and memes about — you guessed it — books, helps introduce people to new recommendations.

Keene Public Library has software that connects to its catalog when promoting certain collections on social media, allowing staff to track data on the impact of these efforts. Through the use of its YouTube account, as well as its Facebook page, Keene Library can constantly promote national events and initiatives at the library, such as the National Teen Lock-in which takes place each summer.

“We were able to promote collections available online, while connecting with our teenage audience,” Fee said. “We were also able to share another part of ourselves, engaging with our young clients in a fun and engaging way.”

Social media has also proven essential for many local libraries during the pandemic.

“It was a lifeline for us to stay in touch with our customers,” said Julie Rios, director of technology at Walpole Town Library. “We held online story hours for our younger guests, and to engage our teenage guests we started an online book club where they read two to three chapters online and kids could interact with staff. through comments.

Like the Chesterfield Library, the Walpole Library has also discovered how far its contents can go.

Recently, Rios received an email from a nine-year-old girl, Ruby, requesting a specific book for online story time. Ruby was in Washington, over 2,948 miles away.

“Who knew the little old Walpole Public Library could reach kids all over Washington State?” said Rios. “The reach of social media is truly exceptional.”

The library has also been doing Facebook Lives – videos filmed and streamed live on its Facebook page – of reviews of books in its collection for just over a year now, starting in March 2021. The videos are then saved to the the library’s Facebook page as well as its YouTube account so people can see it later.

“We’ve definitely seen an increase in the number of snippets that have been reviewed on these ‘lives’ — in fact, those are the fastest-removing books for us,” Rios said.

A sense of community can be found in the Walpole Library’s Facebook thread, with over 30 replies to its most recent “What are you Reading Wednesday?” call, which invites customers to share the novels they read via the comment feature on the post. Currently, genres range from harrowing romances and harrowing murder mysteries to adventurous fictional tales.

Packard noted that building online communities is evident even in the comments on the library’s recent viral video.

“The majority of those 8,000 comments we have on this video are positive – that in itself is a community.” said Packard. “Libraries exist to help people connect with information, and I’m glad we can do that with the use of things like TikTok.”

Applegate echoed those sentiments, referring to the content they create for the library.

“I am happy to be able to show that libraries are not just a place to rest and read – we are much more than that.”

James Rinker is the digital community engagement reporter for The Keene Sentinel. You can contact him at 603-358-8569 or jrinker@keenesentinel.com. Follow him on Twitter at @JamesRinkerKS.

These articles are shared by partners of The Granite State News Collaborative. For more information, visit collaborativenh.org.

]]>
North Korea reports another 15 suspected COVID-19 deaths https://colinmarshallradio.com/north-korea-reports-another-15-suspected-covid-19-deaths/ Sun, 15 May 2022 08:48:06 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/north-korea-reports-another-15-suspected-covid-19-deaths/ SEOUL, South Korea – North Korea has confirmed 15 more deaths and hundreds of thousands more patients with fever as it mobilizes more than a million healthcare and other workers to try to quell the first outbreak country’s COVID-19 outbreak, state media reported on Sunday. After maintaining a widely disputed claim that there was no […]]]>

SEOUL, South Korea – North Korea has confirmed 15 more deaths and hundreds of thousands more patients with fever as it mobilizes more than a million healthcare and other workers to try to quell the first outbreak country’s COVID-19 outbreak, state media reported on Sunday.

After maintaining a widely disputed claim that there was no coronavirus for more than two years, North Korea announced on Thursday that it had found its first COVID-19 patients since the pandemic began.

He said a fever had spread across the country “explosively” since late April, but did not reveal exactly how many COVID-19 cases he found. Some experts say North Korea lacks the diagnostic kits needed to test large numbers of suspected COVID-19 patients.

The additional deaths reported on Sunday brought the fever-related death toll to 42.

The outbreak has raised concerns about a humanitarian crisis in North Korea, as most of the country’s 26 million people are reportedly unvaccinated against the coronavirus and its public health system has been in shambles for decades. Some experts say North Korea could suffer huge deaths if it does not immediately receive outside shipments of vaccines, drugs and other medical supplies.

“Without COVID-19 test kits, North Korea is resorting to body temperature checks to guess infections. But with such an inferior and imprecise method of examination, it is impossible to find asymptomatic virus carriers and control virus outbreaks,” analyst Cheong Seong said. -Chang at the Sejong Institute in South Korea.

“As North Korea’s (presumed) COVID-19 infections increase explosively, its death toll is expected to continue to rise,” Cheong added.

Since Thursday, North Korea has imposed a nationwide lockdown to fight the virus. This could further strain the country’s fragile economy, which has suffered in recent years due to the sharp reduction in foreign trade caused by pandemic-related border closures, punishing UN economic sanctions on its nuclear program and its own mismanagement, say observers.

At a meeting on the outbreak on Saturday, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un described the outbreak as a historic “great upheaval” and called for unity between the government and the people to stabilize the outbreak on as quickly as possible.

KCNA said on Sunday that more than 1.3 million people have been engaged in work to examine and treat the sick and raise awareness about hygiene. He said all people with fever and others with abnormal symptoms were quarantined and treated. KCNA said the elevated response to the pandemic includes setting up more quarantine facilities, urgent transport of medical supplies to hospitals and increased disinfection efforts.

Sign up for daily news!

Stay informed with WPR’s email newsletter.

“All provinces, cities and counties across the country have been totally locked down and work units, production units and residential units closed off from each other since the morning of May 12 and a strict and intensive scrutiny of all people is ongoing,” KCNA said. .

Of those with symptoms, 496,030 have recovered, while as of Saturday 324,4550 were still receiving treatment, KCNA reported, citing the country’s emergency epidemic prevention center.

According to state media, Kim and other senior North Korean officials are donating their private reserve drugs to support the country’s anti-pandemic fight. At Saturday’s meeting, Kim expressed optimism about the country’s ability to bring the outbreak under control, saying most transmissions occur within communities isolated from each other and do not spread from one region. to the other.

Despite the outbreak, Kim ordered officials to press ahead with planned economic, construction and other state projects, a suggestion that authorities are not requiring people to stay home. Hours after admitting its virus outbreak on Thursday, North Korea even fired ballistic missiles out to sea as a continuation of its recent round of weapons tests.

KCNA said Kim, accompanied by senior lawmakers, visited a mourning station set up for senior official Yang Hyong Sop, who died a day earlier, on Saturday to express condolences and meet with bereaved relatives. A separate KCNA dispatch said on Sunday that officials and workers in the northeast were launching initiatives to prevent an expected spring drought from hurting crop yields and quality.

South Korea and China have offered to send vaccines, medical supplies and other aid shipments to North Korea, but Pyongyang has not publicly responded to the overtures. North Korea previously refused millions of doses of vaccines offered by the UN-backed COVAX distribution program amid speculation that it was worried about possible side effects from the vaccines or the international monitoring requirements attached to them. injections.

White House press secretary Jen Psaki said Thursday that the United States supports international aid efforts but does not plan to share vaccine supplies with the North. The North Korean virus outbreak could still be a major talking point when President Joe Biden travels to Seoul later this week for a summit with new South Korean President Yoon Suk Yeol.

Former South Korean spy chief Park Jie-won wrote on Facebook on Friday that he had proposed in May 2021, then director of the National Intelligence Service, that Washington send 60 million doses of vaccines to North Korea as a humanitarian aid through COVAX. He said there were later discussions at the UN and the Vatican about sending 60 million doses to North Korea as well, but such aid was never realized as no formal offer was made. was made to North Korea.

Park said he hoped North Korea would quickly accept offers of help from Yoon, although he doubted the North would.

]]>
‘Memoria’ is a wonderfully eerie sound detective story https://colinmarshallradio.com/memoria-is-a-wonderfully-eerie-sound-detective-story/ Fri, 13 May 2022 17:06:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/memoria-is-a-wonderfully-eerie-sound-detective-story/ I’m a huge fan of Thai writer-director Apichatpong Weerasethakul, who does little to dispel the widely held assumption that he makes movies only a critic can love. Weerasethakul’s films, like tropical disease and Syndromes and a century, certainly demand special attention: they are slow-moving and contemplative, steeped in Thai folklore and Buddhist belief, and they […]]]>

I’m a huge fan of Thai writer-director Apichatpong Weerasethakul, who does little to dispel the widely held assumption that he makes movies only a critic can love. Weerasethakul’s films, like tropical disease and Syndromes and a century, certainly demand special attention: they are slow-moving and contemplative, steeped in Thai folklore and Buddhist belief, and they have little interest in conventional storytelling. They are also exciting and deeply moving; if you enter them with your eyes and ears wide open and take the time to adapt to their rhythms, it’s hard not to fall under their spell.

Weerasethakul’s new film is called Memory, and while it’s as wonderfully weird as anything he’s ever done, it’s also a bit of a departure. It’s his first feature film entirely shot outside of Thailand, and it’s also his first collaboration with a movie star, in this case the great Tilda Swinton. She is quietly fascinating as a Scottish-born botanist named Jessica, who lives in Medellín, Colombia. She recently came to Bogotá to visit her sister, who is recovering from a mysterious illness. The film begins when Jessica is awakened in the middle of the night by a loud bang.

In the days to come, Jessica will hear that bang over and over again, and soon she will realize that she is the only one who can hear it. Memory is a sound detective story, and it follows Jessica around the city as she tries to figure out what sound is and why she hears it. She visits a young sound engineer named Hernán, played by Juan Pablo Urrego, who tries to help recreate the noise using pre-recorded sound effects. Speaking in a mix of Spanish and English, Jessica describes the sound as “a big ball of concrete falling into a metal pit”.

Jessica’s investigation takes her in many strange directions. She visits an archaeologist who is studying recently discovered human remains that may have something to do with the sound she hears. She spends some more time with Hernán, but he suddenly disappears, leaving her – and us – wondering if she’s losing her grip on reality.

Eventually, Jessica travels to a nearby mountain village and meets an older fisherman, oddly also named Hernán, played by Elkin Díaz. Could they be two different versions of the same person? This wouldn’t be a surprise in the world of Weerasethakul, which is full of parallel realities and reincarnated spirits.

Hernán says he is both blessed and cursed by his ability to remember everything that happened to him, which gives a clue to the meaning of Memorythe title. It all culminates in a climax that left my jaw on the floor, as we finally find out what caused that sound – although, as always with Weerasethakul, the reveal brings more questions than answers.

But at the same time Memory With its share of confusing moments, Swinton’s restrained presence anchors each scene. There’s something particularly poignant about Jessica’s time with the elder Hernán, in which we see two people who have never met forge an inexplicable but deep connection. You can’t take your eyes off Swinton, even when she’s just sitting quietly listening to someone talk. You are reminded, at times like these, that the simple act of listening to someone can be an act of radical empathy.

There were a lot of mixed reactions last year when film distributor Neon announced that Memory would only be shown on the big screen, as part of an endless road-tour style outing. As of now, there are no plans for the film to be available on DVD or any streaming platforms. There is something refreshing about this approach, which deals Memory not as a mere piece of disposable, streamable content, but as a work of art whose crystal-clear images and intricate sound design demand to be experienced in the best possible way. I hope you will experience Memorybecause it’s one of the most moving films you’ll see – or hear – in theaters this year.

Copyright 2022 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh air.

]]>
Oregon adopts heat and smoke rules for workers https://colinmarshallradio.com/oregon-adopts-heat-and-smoke-rules-for-workers/ Thu, 12 May 2022 00:03:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/oregon-adopts-heat-and-smoke-rules-for-workers/ Oregon has some of the nation’s most protective smoke and heat rules for workers. After more than a year and a half of developing rules, the Oregon Division of Occupational Safety and Health has adopted permanent rules to protect workers working in excessive heat or smoke from a Forest fire. The rules are similar to […]]]>

Oregon has some of the nation’s most protective smoke and heat rules for workers.

After more than a year and a half of developing rules, the Oregon Division of Occupational Safety and Health has adopted permanent rules to protect workers working in excessive heat or smoke from a Forest fire. The rules are similar to the temporary measures adopted at the 2021 Heat Dome event. At least four people died at work during the record-breaking heat wave, including a farm worker who died of heat stress on a farm north of Salem.

New heat rules apply to outdoor and indoor work activities when temperatures exceed 80 degrees Fahrenheit. The rules require employers to provide employees with access to shade, fresh drinking water, extra breaks when temperatures exceed 90 degrees and an acclimatization period to gradually help employees adapt . The rules also require training on the prevention of heat-related illnesses.

the wildfire smoke rules apply when the Air quality index reached 101, which is moderate danger levels. Employers must provide N95 face masks or other federally approved face masks for voluntary use. These masks are mandatory when the AQI reaches 251. The rules also require communicating with employees about smoke levels from wildfires, moving workers indoors, changing work schedules and providing l filtered air when the air quality is poor.

Aaron Corvin, an Oregon OSHA public information officer, said the agency considers the rules to be the most protective in the nation. Corvin said there was more than a year and a half of stakeholder feedback.

The rules come into effect this summer to give employers time to adjust, get equipment and provide training.

“We set the standard, we have resources to enforce it and educational resources to share,” Corvin said. “It will also take work from the people who are on their sites every day to make sure we achieve this.”

Environmental and labor rights groups welcome the new protections, but enforcement will be key.

“These are really common-sense protections that don’t even currently exist at the federal level,” said Jamie Pang, environmental health program director for the Oregon Environmental Council, an environmental nonprofit. “What remains to be seen is how it will be implemented and how successful it will be.”

Pang said the application of rules such as the schedule of breaks for the prevention of heat illnesses could be difficult for Oregon OSHA to oversee. Under the rule, employers can develop one of three break plans that limit employee exposure when temperatures reach 90 degrees or more.

“Proponents lobbied for Oregon OSHA to make it more clear and streamlined and to make it less ambiguous,” Pang said. “But ultimately Oregon OSHA decided to provide three tables, which are basically three choices for work and rest schedules.”

Pang said the agency should also have dedicated inspectors to investigate specific job sites such as construction or warehouses, especially on hot and smoky days.

“Climate change is an existential threat to all life on Earth and frankly, workplaces are no different, especially for people who have to train in the elements or in uncontrolled temperature environments,” a- she declared.

Ira Cuello-Martinez, climate policy associate at farmworker advocacy group Pineros Y Campesinos Unidos del Noroeste in Woodburn, said the rules are a step in the right direction, but added that many farmworkers are struggling to trust Oregon OSHA and are reluctant to file complaints.

“It’s based on experiences they’ve had either with a lack of communication or follow-up or employers not being fined enough for some of the violations,” he said. . “We have also heard of experiences of retaliation where if a worker speaks up they may be vulnerable to losing their job and in some cases even being blacklisted by contractors.”

Cuello-Martinez expressed concern about how the training will be implemented and whether employees will have enough time to learn the requirements on different job sites, as many farm workers work on different farms throughout the year. and some even work at different sites on the same day.

“I’m sure every employer is going to approach it differently, and we just want to provide those spaces and opportunities to talk to our community about what they’ve heard, what we see in the rules and what needs to be applied. within their workplace,” he said.

Mary Anne Cooper, vice president of government and legal affairs for the Oregon Farm Bureau, said the new rules could potentially expose producers to penalties and litigation.

“Oregon Farm Bureau provided comments consistently urging Oregon OSHA to create rules that are enforceable by family farms while protecting workers,” she said in an emailed statement. “Unfortunately, Oregon-OSHA has passed rules that impose immense liability on small, family-owned businesses at a time when they are already struggling to stay afloat.”

The heat rules go into effect June 15 and the wildfire smoke rules go into effect July 1. Currently, Washington and California have temporary rules to protect workers and are also working on permanent rules that have yet to be implemented.

Copyright 2022 Oregon Public Broadcasting. To see more, visit Oregon Public Broadcasting.

]]>
In Texas, abortion laws prevent coverage for miscarriages https://colinmarshallradio.com/in-texas-abortion-laws-prevent-coverage-for-miscarriages/ Tue, 10 May 2022 09:00:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/in-texas-abortion-laws-prevent-coverage-for-miscarriages/ As the Supreme Court appears poised to return abortion regulation to the states, recent experience in Texas shows that medical care for miscarriages and dangerous ectopic pregnancies would also be at risk if restrictions become widespread. . A texas law passed last year lists several drugs as abortion-inducing drugs and largely bans their use for […]]]>

As the Supreme Court appears poised to return abortion regulation to the states, recent experience in Texas shows that medical care for miscarriages and dangerous ectopic pregnancies would also be at risk if restrictions become widespread. .

A texas law passed last year lists several drugs as abortion-inducing drugs and largely bans their use for abortion after the seventh week of pregnancy. But two of those drugs, misoprostol and mifepristone, are the only drugs recommended in American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists guidelines for treating a patient after an early pregnancy loss.

The other miscarriage treatment is a procedure described as surgical uterine evacuation to remove pregnancy tissue – the same approach as for an abortion.

“The challenge is that treating an abortion and treating a miscarriage are exactly the same,” said Dr. Sarah Pragerprofessor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Washington in Seattle and an expert in early pregnancy loss.

Miscarriages occur in about 1 in 10 pregnancies. Some people experience pregnancy loss at home and don’t need any additional care, other than emotional support, said Dr. Tony Ogburn, who chairs the OB-GYN department at the University of Texas-Rio Grande Valley School of Medicine. But in other situations, he said, providers may need to intervene to stop the bleeding and make sure no pregnancy tissue remains, as a protection against infection.

dr. Lauren ThaxtonOB-GYN and assistant professor at Dell Medical School at the University of Texas at Austin, has heard of local patients who miscarried and couldn’t get a pharmacy to fill their misoprostol prescription.

“The pharmacy said, ‘We don’t know whether or not you’re using this medication for abortion,'” she said.

Thaxton, who supervises obstetrics and gynecology residents who have seen these patients, said sometimes the prescribing clinic does intervene, but it takes longer for the patient to get the medication. Other times patients don’t report the problem and miscarry on their own, she says, but without medication they risk further bleeding.

Under another new Texas abortion law, a person who “aids or abets” an abortion after heart activity can be detected – usually around six weeks – can be fined up to minus $10,000 per occurrence. Anyone can bring a civil action, which poses a dilemma for doctors and other providers. How do they follow the latest guidelines when many others — from other healthcare professionals to friends and family members — may question their intent: are they helping treat a miscarriage or facilitating an abortion?

Sometimes patients don’t realize they’ve lost their pregnancy until they come in for a checkup and no heart activity can be detected, said Dr. Emily Briggs, a family doctor who gives birth at New Braunfels, Texas. At this point, the patient may choose to wait for the bleeding to begin and for the pregnancy tissue to be naturally released, Briggs said.

For some, it’s too difficult, given the emotions surrounding pregnancy loss, she said. Instead, the patient can choose medication or a surgical evacuation procedure, which Briggs says may be necessary anyway to prevent a patient from becoming septic if some tissue remains in the eye. ‘uterus.

But now in Texas, new laws are creating uncertainties that may deter some doctors and other providers from offering optimal miscarriage treatment.

These situations can create significant moral distress for patients and providers, said Bryn Esplin, a bioethicist and assistant professor of medical education at the University of North Texas Health Sciences Center in Fort Worth. “Any law that creates reluctance for doctors to meet the standard of care for a patient has a cascade of adverse effects for both the patient and everyone else,” Esplin said.

This is an emotional and legal dilemma that potentially faces not only obstetricians and midwives, but also family physicians, emergency physicians, pharmacists and anyone else who may be involved in health care. pregnancy. And Ogburn, who noted he was speaking personally and not for medical school, worries fears about Texas laws have already delayed care.

“I wouldn’t say that’s true for our practice,” he said. “But I’ve certainly heard discussions among doctors that they’re very hesitant to do any kind of surgery until they’re absolutely sure it’s not a viable pregnancy – even if the amount of bleeding would warrant intervention because it is life threatening to the mother.”

John Seago, Legislative Director of Texas right to life, describes this type of hesitation as “an awful misunderstanding of the law”. Even before the two bills were passed, existing Texas law stated that the act was not an abortion if it involved the treatment of an ectopic pregnancy – which most often occurs when the pregnancy develops. into the fallopian tube — or to “remove a dead, unborn child whose death was caused by spontaneous abortion,” he said, pointing to the law. Another area of ​​Texas law cited by Seago provides an exception to state abortion restrictions if the mother’s life is in danger or she is at “serious risk of substantial impairment of a major bodily function” unless an abortion is performed.

“It’s a pro-life position to allow doctors to make these life-and-death decisions,” Seago said. “And that can mean, in certain circumstances, protecting the mother in that situation and the deceased child.”

But interpreting the laws still poses challenges to care. At least several Austin-area OB-GYNs received a letter from a pharmacy in late 2021 saying it would no longer refill the drug methotrexate for an ectopic pregnancy, citing recent Texas laws, the report said. Dr. Charlie Brown, an Austin-based obstetrician-gynecologist who provided a copy to KHN. Methotrexate is also listed in Texas law passed last year.

An ectopic pregnancy develops in about 2% of reported pregnancies. Methotrexate or surgery are the only two options listed in medical guidelines to prevent fallopian tubes from rupturing and causing dangerous bleeding.

“Ectopic pregnancies can kill people,” said Brown, district president of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, representing Texas.

Tom Mayo, a law professor at the Dedman School of Law at Southwestern Methodist University in Dallas, understands why some members of the Texas pharmaceutical community might be nervous. “The penalties are quite draconian,” he said, noting that someone could be found guilty of a crime.

However, Mayo said her reading of the law allows the use of methotrexate to treat an ectopic pregnancy. In addition, he said, other Texas laws and the Roe vs. Wade decision provides an exception to authorize abortion if the life of a pregnant person is in danger.

Because Texas laws include a stipulation that there must be an intent to induce an abortion, Mayo said he would advise physicians and other clinicians to closely document the rationale for medical care, whether to treat a miscarriage or an ectopic pregnancy.

But Prager thinks laws in Texas — and possibly soon elsewhere — could increase doctors’ vulnerability to medical malpractice lawsuits. Consider the patient whose miscarriage care is delayed and develops a serious infection and other complications, Prager said. “And they decide to file a malpractice suit,” she said. “They absolutely can do it.”

Texas providers are still adjusting to other ripple effects that affect patient care. Dr. Jennifer Liedtke, a family physician in Sweetwater, Texas, who delivers about 175 babies a year, no longer sends misoprostol prescriptions to the local Walmart. Since the new laws came into effect, Liedtke said, the pharmacist has repeatedly refused to supply the drug, citing the new law – despite Liedtke writing the prescription to treat a miscarriage. Walmart officials did not respond to multiple requests for comment.

Since pharmacists go through this Walmart, Liedtke decided to send these prescriptions to other pharmacies rather than trying to sort out the misunderstanding again each time.

“It’s hard to form a relationship to say, ‘Hey, look, I’m not using this for elective abortion,'” she said. “‘I’m just using it because it’s not a viable pregnancy.'”

KHN (Kaiser Health News) is a national newsroom that produces in-depth journalism on health issues. It is an editorially independent operating program of KFF (Kaiser Family Foundation).

Copyright 2022 Kaiser Health News. To see more, visit Kaiser Health News.

]]>
Dozens of people died after a Russian bomb blasted a Ukrainian school https://colinmarshallradio.com/dozens-of-people-died-after-a-russian-bomb-blasted-a-ukrainian-school/ Sun, 08 May 2022 11:17:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/dozens-of-people-died-after-a-russian-bomb-blasted-a-ukrainian-school/ Updated May 8, 2022 10:46 a.m. ET ZAPORIZHZHIA, Ukraine – Dozens of Ukrainians were reportedly killed on Sunday after a Russian bomb razed a school housing around 90 people in its basement, while Ukrainian troops refused to enter a besieged steelworks that forces of Moscow invasion rushed to seize before Russia’s Victory Day holiday. The […]]]>

Updated May 8, 2022 10:46 a.m. ET

ZAPORIZHZHIA, Ukraine – Dozens of Ukrainians were reportedly killed on Sunday after a Russian bomb razed a school housing around 90 people in its basement, while Ukrainian troops refused to enter a besieged steelworks that forces of Moscow invasion rushed to seize before Russia’s Victory Day holiday.

The governor of Luhansk province, one of two regions that make up the eastern industrial heartland known as Donbas, said the school in the village of Bilohorivka caught fire after Saturday’s bombing. Emergency teams found two bodies and rescued 30 people, he said.

“Most likely the 60 people who remain under the rubble are now dead,” Governor Serhiy Haidai wrote on the Telegram messaging app. Russian shelling also killed two boys, aged 11 and 14, in the nearby town of Pryvillia, he said.

Europe’s biggest conflict since World War II has turned into a punitive war of attrition due to the Ukrainian army’s unexpected defensive effectiveness. Since failing to capture the Ukrainian capital, Kyiv, Moscow’s forces have attacked towns, villages and villages in eastern and southern Ukraine, but have not not gained much ground, according to Western military analysts.

To demonstrate its success in time for VE Day on Monday, the Russian military worked to complete its takeover of Mariupol, which has been under relentless assault since the war began. The sprawling seaside steelworks where around 2,000 Ukrainian fighters were fighting their last stand is the only part of the city not under Russian control.

All the remaining women, children and older civilians who had taken refuge with the fighters in the Azovstal factory were evacuated on Saturday. Ukrainian troops rejected deadlines given by the Russians who said the defenders could leave with their lives if they laid down their arms.

Captain Sviatoslav Palamar, deputy commander of the Azov Regiment, a Ukrainian National Guard battalion that holds the steel plant, told an online news conference on Sunday that the site had been targeted overnight by three outings. fighter planes, artillery and tanks.

“We are under constant shelling,” he said, adding that Russian infantry had tried to storm the factory – a claim denied by Russian officials in recent days – and plant landmines. .

Palamar said there was a “multitude of casualties” at the plant.

Lt. Illya Samoilenko, another member of the Azov regiment, said there were “a few hundred” wounded soldiers at the factory, but he refused at the same press conference to reveal how many able-bodied fighters also remained. in the factory.

He described the situation as dire because they had no lifesaving equipment in their tunnels. He also said fighters had to dig people up by hand when some bunkers collapsed under Russian shelling.

“The truth is that we are unique because no one expected us to last this long,” Samoilenko said. “Surrender for us is unacceptable because we cannot grant such a gift to the enemy.”

Western allies move to show support ahead of VE Day

After rescuers evacuated the last civilians, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy said in his nightly video address that work would continue on Sunday to secure humanitarian corridors allowing residents of Mariupol and surrounding towns to leave.

The Ukrainian government contacted international organizations to try to secure safe passage for the fighters remaining in the factory’s underground tunnels and bunkers.

The Ukrainian leader was due to hold online talks with British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, US President Joe Biden and leaders of other Group of Seven countries on Sunday. The meeting is partly meant to show unity among Western allies Victory in Europe Day, which marks the surrender of Nazi Germany in 1945.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau paid a surprise visit to Irpin, which had been damaged by Russia’s attempt to take kyiv at the start of the war, according to Ukrainian media outlet Suspilne and Irpin Mayor Olexander Markushyn.

Canadian officials did not immediately acknowledge Trudeau’s presence.

Trudeau is the latest Western leader to come to Ukraine to offer his support to the country.

US First Lady Jill Biden made an unannounced visit to western Ukraine. She held a surprise Mother’s Day meeting with Ukraine’s first lady Olena Zelenska at a village school as Russia continued its punitive war in the eastern regions.

Biden has traveled under the cloak of secrecy, becoming the latest high-profile American to enter Ukraine during his 10-week dispute with Russia.

Putin is expected to address Russian troops on Monday

Elsewhere on Ukraine’s coast, explosions rang out again on Sunday at the major Black Sea port of Odessa, which Russia hit on Saturday with six cruise missiles, while rocket fire damaged some 250 apartments, according to City Council.

Ukrainian leaders have warned the attacks will only get worse as Victory Day approaches, the May 9 public holiday when Russia celebrates the defeat of Nazi Germany in 1945 with military parades. Russian President Vladimir Putin is believed to want to proclaim some sort of triumph in Ukraine when he addresses troops in Red Square on Monday.

Zelenskyy released a video address on Sunday marking Allied Victory Day in Europe 77 years ago, drawing parallels between Russia’s invasion of Ukraine and the evils of Nazism.

The black-and-white video, posted on social media, showed Zelenskyy standing in front of a crumbling building in Borodyanka, one of Kyiv’s suburbs destroyed before Russian troops withdrew from the capital region a few years ago. weeks.

“Every year on May 8, together with the entire civilized world, we honor all those who defended the planet against Nazism during World War II,” Zelenskyy said, adding that previous generations of Ukrainians had understood the meaning of the words “never again”. “, a phrase often used as a vow never to allow a repeat of the horrors of the Holoucaust.

“We knew the price our ancestors paid for this wisdom. We knew how important it was to protect it and pass it on to our descendants. … But we had no idea that our generation would witness the ‘abuse of those words.,’ he said.

The war has put neighboring countries on high alert

In neighboring Moldova, Russian and separatist troops were on “full alert”, the Ukrainian army warned. The region has increasingly become a focus of concern about the spread of the conflict beyond Ukraine’s borders.

Pro-Russian forces broke off the Transnistria section of Moldova in 1992, and Russian troops have been stationed there ever since, ostensibly as peacekeepers. These forces are “fully combat-ready”, Ukraine said, without giving details on how it arrived at the assessment.

Moscow has sought to sweep across southern Ukraine both to cut the country off from the Black Sea and to create a corridor to Transnistria. But he struggled to achieve those goals.

A sign of the fierce resistance that sustained the fighting until its 11th week, the Ukrainian army struck Russian positions on a Black Sea island that was captured in the early days of the war and became a symbol of the Ukrainian resistance.

Satellite photos analyzed by The Associated Press showed Ukraine targeting Russian-held Snake Island in an attempt to thwart Russian efforts to control the sea.

A satellite image taken Sunday morning by Planet Labs PBC showed smoke rising from two sites on the island. On the southern edge of the island, a fire smoldered next to debris. This matched a video released by the Ukrainian military showing a strike on a Russian helicopter that had flown towards the island.

The heaviest fighting in recent days has taken place in eastern Ukraine. A Ukrainian counteroffensive near Kharkiv, a northeastern city that is the country’s second largest, “is making significant progress and will likely advance to the Russian border in the days or weeks to come”, according to the report. Institute for the Study of War.

The Washington-based think tank added that “the Ukrainian counteroffensive demonstrates promising Ukrainian capabilities.”

However, the Ukrainian army has withdrawn from the besieged town of Popasna in Luhansk province, Haidai, the regional governor, said on Sunday. In a video interview posted on his Telegram channel, Haidai said Kyiv troops had “moved to stronger positions, which they had prepared in advance”.

Rodion Miroshnik, a representative of the pro-Kremlin breakaway Luhansk People’s Republic, said his forces and Russian troops had captured most of Popasna after two months of fierce fighting.

Russian-backed rebels have established a breakaway region in Luhansk and neighboring Donetsk, which together form Ukraine’s industrial heartland known as Donbass. Russia has targeted areas still under Ukrainian control.

The leader of Transnistria, a separatist territory bordering Ukraine which separated from Moldova in 1992 and hosts around 1,500 Russian soldiers, denied allegations of mobilization in the region. The Ukrainian army had previously warned that Russian and separatist troops were on “full alert”.

Vadim Krasnoselsky, the chairman of the unrecognized territory, said he “does not pose a threat to neighboring states, observes neutrality and remains committed to the principle of resolving all issues at the negotiating table”.

Copyright 2022 NPR. To learn more, visit https://www.npr.org.

]]>
Indiana man charged with murder wins township primary race https://colinmarshallradio.com/indiana-man-charged-with-murder-wins-township-primary-race/ Fri, 06 May 2022 16:05:35 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/indiana-man-charged-with-murder-wins-township-primary-race/ LEBANON, Ind. (AP) — A central Indiana man charged with murder in connection with the death of his wife in March has won a township council primary. Andrew Wilhoite, 40, of Lebanon, received 60 of 276 total votes on Tuesday for Republicans for three positions on the Clinton Township council, according to Boone County election […]]]>

LEBANON, Ind. (AP) — A central Indiana man charged with murder in connection with the death of his wife in March has won a township council primary.

Andrew Wilhoite, 40, of Lebanon, received 60 of 276 total votes on Tuesday for Republicans for three positions on the Clinton Township council, according to Boone County election results.

Wilhoite was arrested in late March in the death of 41-year-old Elizabeth “Nikki” Wilhoite. He has been held in the Boone County jail since then without bail.

Indiana State Police say Andrew Wilhoite struck Nikki Wilhoite in the head with a blunt object, knocking her unconscious. He then put her in a vehicle and drove to a creek a few miles from their home and dumped her body there, police said.

Police found Nikki Wilhoite’s body on March 26 partially submerged in approximately 3 feet (1 meter) of water.

Court records indicate Nikki Wilhoite filed for divorce on March 17. The couple had been married for 12 years.

Andrew Wilhoite’s jury trial is scheduled for August 29, according to online court records.

If he is found guilty of a crime before the November 8 general election, he will automatically be removed from the ballot. No Democrats have filed for the Clinton Township Board.

“In our legal system, everyone is innocent until proven guilty,” said Brad King, co-director of the Indiana Electoral Division.

A message seeking comment on the charges against Wilhoite was left Friday by The Associated Press for Wilhoite’s attorney.

]]>
Outside: Mother’s Day | Interlochen Public Radio https://colinmarshallradio.com/outside-mothers-day-interlochen-public-radio/ Wed, 04 May 2022 10:01:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/outside-mothers-day-interlochen-public-radio/ I find it fascinating to see the natural world through the observations of our junior campers here in Interlochen. I remember a conversation in which a young theater student announced that she thought it was “totally unfair that the male birds got all the good singing roles and better costumes”. Although I wouldn’t have put […]]]>

I find it fascinating to see the natural world through the observations of our junior campers here in Interlochen. I remember a conversation in which a young theater student announced that she thought it was “totally unfair that the male birds got all the good singing roles and better costumes”.

Although I wouldn’t have put it quite that way, it is very true that in most cases only male birds sing and the plumage of male birds tends to be more colorful and distinctive than that of females.

As Mother’s Day approaches, it’s worth remembering that the mother bird incubating the eggs, and sitting in a nest, she is vulnerable. But because it has dull and often somewhat mottled plumage, it is less likely to be detected by predators.

In addition, the males sing and show off their fine feathers because it is the mother birds who choose. Instinctively, females are attracted to the best singers and the brightest colored potential mates: the avian eyes. And the male who most closely resembles his own sire is the most desirable sire to his offspring.

Makes sense. The color of the feathers results from the pigments present in the food of the birds. To have shiny and shiny feathers, a male needs to eat a lot of very nutritious food. It follows that a well-fed male would be the best provider for the nestlings. So when a mother bird favors a colorful mate, she is actually selecting a good father.

Singing is the same thing. Many male birds attract mates and also protect their territories by singing. But singing makes it easier for predators (and birdwatchers) to locate them. If the females sang, predators could locate the nest.

There are exceptions. Female cardinals sing and although they are not as conspicuously red as the males, they are more colorful than many other species. They tend to be stealthy around their nest, but predators will scout and locate and often attack cardinal nests.

Fortunately, the Cardinals are persistent. If their nest is destroyed, they start over. Researchers tell us that sometimes a pair may attempt to nest seven or eight times in a season before raising a full brood.

In fact, for survival reasons, a dull and calm mother bird has a much better chance of raising healthy offspring. Nature takes care of mothers. HAPPY MOTHER’S DAY.

]]>
The Great Guitars | KNKX Public Radio https://colinmarshallradio.com/the-great-guitars-knkx-public-radio/ Mon, 02 May 2022 12:01:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/the-great-guitars-knkx-public-radio/ ENTER TO WIN TICKETS. The Great Guitars traces its colorful heritage back to the 1970s, when legendary jazz guitarists of that era toured the world and recorded together. Award-winning guitarist Martin Taylor, who replaced Herb Ellis as part of the original band in the 1980s along with the legends Barney Kessel and Charlie Byrd, revised […]]]>

ENTER TO WIN TICKETS.

The Great Guitars traces its colorful heritage back to the 1970s, when legendary jazz guitarists of that era toured the world and recorded together. Award-winning guitarist Martin Taylor, who replaced Herb Ellis as part of the original band in the 1980s along with the legends Barney Kessel and Charlie Byrd, revised the format for the 21st century by enlisting two of today’s finest jazz guitarists. hui to co-create a brilliant program combining guitar mastery, emotion, humor and musical fireworks.

Combining Taylor’s award-winning virtuoso fingerstyle with Vignola’s jaw-dropping technique and Jorgenson’s incredible musical versatility, the concert features solo, duo and trio performances from these three acclaimed masters of fingerstyle, jazz and gypsy guitar. Between them, these three great guitarists have worked with artists ranging from Tommy Emmanuel to David Grisman, from Donald Fagen to Wynton Marsalis and from Bonnie Raitt to Bob Dylan.

Pat Metheny is calling Martin Taylor “one of the most impressive solo guitarists in the history of the instrument”, while Jeff Beck says, “he surpasses us all – I’ve never seen anything like it”. Taylor is widely recognized as the world’s foremost exponent of solo fingerstyle jazz guitar playing, with a record 15 British Jazz Awards, Top 10 Albums in the US and Europe, and an MBE from the Queen of Britain. His innovative online guitar school now trains guitarists in over 60 countries.

The deadline for registration is May 8, 2022.

**By entering to win tickets, you agree to receive future updates on exclusive KNKX concerts and events from KNKX. We respect your privacy and will not share your information.**

]]>
Give Back NH: BRING IT! After school https://colinmarshallradio.com/give-back-nh-bring-it-after-school/ Sat, 30 Apr 2022 16:22:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/give-back-nh-bring-it-after-school/ Brendan McCafferty (Director): My name is Brendan McCafferty. I am originally from Manchester. I grew up a street away. I am the Hillside Middle School Principal where the program is located. And I started the program 16 years ago with Hector Urrea. The acronym stood for Bringing refugees, immigrants and neighbors smoothly into tomorrow. So, […]]]>

Brendan McCafferty (Director): My name is Brendan McCafferty. I am originally from Manchester. I grew up a street away. I am the Hillside Middle School Principal where the program is located. And I started the program 16 years ago with Hector Urrea. The acronym stood for Bringing refugees, immigrants and neighbors smoothly into tomorrow.

So, in other words, connecting newcomers to locals, which will always be your new version of what Manchester is. So we started with football, dancing, and 16 years later it led to many other things.

In addition to receiving help with homework and a hot meal, children are encouraged to connect with each other through a variety of activities…soccer being their favorite choice.

Doug LeClerc (Director of Operations): My name is Douglas LeClerc. I’m the COO of BRING IT. Currently, many of the students we work with come from East Africa. Thus countries like Rwanda, Uganda, Tanzania and the Democratic Republic of Congo. So we have a lot of students who speak Swahili, a lot of students who speak Kinyarwanda. This year, we received many new Portuguese-speaking Brazilian students.

Communication can sometimes be a problem, but luckily for us, we were able to hire diverse staff members who were actually program participants for us. So we have staff who speak, community, speak Kinyarwanda, speak Swahili, speak French. So it’s very nice for a lot of our new students to come here and get help in their native language.

Simfora Bangasimbo (Deputy Director): My name is Simfora Bangasimbo and I was born in Tanzania and in a refugee camp. But I am Congolese… my parents are from the Democratic Republic of Congo. I’ve been at BRING IT since 2009. I started as a student, and now I’m working here.

As a newcomer, I didn’t know English so I needed a lot of help at first. But [BRINGT IT!] was also a place to hang out with friends where we can learn the American system together, play football together, dance together and feel like we are not alone.

I was graduated [college] in 2020. I joined a master’s program in Switzerland, so I will go in September, focusing mainly on human rights and humanitarianism. This program… it didn’t save me, but it helped me a lot. I think I would have been very lost without it.

20220406_183732.jpg

Manchester natives Brendan McCafferty and Doug LeClerc lead the day-to-day operations of BRING IT! After school.

Doug Leclerc: For anyone not aware of our program, I think this is a great opportunity for anyone to contact us and learn more about us or even stop by to visit us.

We are also always looking for donations, not necessarily always financial, but we have had people who have provided football boots for children, school supplies for children, some people who have stepped up to provide meals and meals sponsored for children each evening.

When I was growing up, I had no idea that our city was so diverse and that we had such great programs going on. So I think it would be great for anyone to stop and see what’s happening in our city, and learn how we’re trying to provide as much support as possible to families who really need it.
_______________________________________________

How to get involved:

Learn more about BRING IT! After School Program, here. You can donate or find volunteer opportunities, here.

the children are going to dinner.jpg

The Bring It After School program provides hot meals for its children.
]]>