Public radio – Colin Marshall Radio http://colinmarshallradio.com/ Fri, 30 Sep 2022 21:43:32 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://colinmarshallradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-1-1-120x120.png Public radio – Colin Marshall Radio http://colinmarshallradio.com/ 32 32 Craig Nyman | Nevada Public Radio https://colinmarshallradio.com/craig-nyman-nevada-public-radio/ Fri, 30 Sep 2022 21:25:42 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/craig-nyman-nevada-public-radio/ The Life is Beautiful programmer turned his trauma into purpose, keeping the thrill of live music a reality for Las Vegas — and for himself Craig Nyman is doing very well. But it took him a long time to get there: four years, one month and six days, as he reveals. That’s nearly 1,500 days […]]]>

The Life is Beautiful programmer turned his trauma into purpose, keeping the thrill of live music a reality for Las Vegas — and for himself

Craig Nyman is doing very well. But it took him a long time to get there: four years, one month and six days, as he reveals. That’s nearly 1,500 days to recapture the daily joy he felt before that tragic night on Route 91, which he attended with a group of friends. The day before his epiphany – November 6, 2021 – he had gone to the Rolling Stones concert at Allegiant Stadium with his brother and parents. It was a celebration in full swing: Nyman’s very first gig was a 1989 Stones show, also experienced with his family. The next morning he woke up and said to himself, “I feel really happy.”

If you know Nyman even by chance, the first thing you imagine when you hear his name is his permanent smile. Even before 2013, when he landed his dream gig as head of music and programming for Life Is Beautiful – the annual downtown Las Vegas festival – his face always suggested that his very life was a dream gig. But October 1, 2017 obscured the light that naturally emanated from him.

It is unlikely that the road to recovery began exactly a week after the shooting, at the same resort from which the shots rang out. Nyman attended a House of Blues concert conducted by Billy Idol, mainly to reunite with managers associated with both Idol and Tom Petty, the latter of whom had died suddenly five days earlier. Grief hung in the air that night, but Nyman miraculously got stronger and found his focus. “That moment, for me, was like jumping straight back into things,” he says. “For example, I can’t be afraid of things, even if it can be hurtful and painful like (the shooting). It was just, my path is to move forward collectively to heal people and bring joy and happiness. happiness.

Which meant getting into two things: therapy and work. The first came from a professional specializing in traumatology and offered her services free of charge to the survivors of the festival. (“That gesture saved my life,” Nyman says through tears.) The latter was possible because his colleagues at Life Is Beautiful shielded him from any security concerns — which now included additional exits and law enforcement, helicopters and police drones – so he can focus on the event offering. The 2018 edition took place safely and without violence.

The same can be said for most other entertainment events in Las Vegas since. Venues have paid greater attention to safety, as well as to the capabilities of the public. Nyman keeps out of crowds these days and looks for anything suspicious. However, what he primarily sees is a culture and industry that seems ambivalent about violence at public events; even warnings to see something say something have all but disappeared.

“It shouldn’t be something that when an October 1st anniversary comes around, we move (along), and there’s a plethora of entertainment and concerts in the city,” Nyman says. “And I understand that we’re a city open for business… But that’s not something that should be lost or forgotten, especially in the city, let alone in our country.”

If there’s a silver lining for Nyman, it’s that October 1 reinforced his resolve to renormalize large gatherings and experience the elation that comes with communal musical experiences. “I knew there was no way that night that person would take away my joy from attending live music and hosting events,” he says, the challenge in his voice. “It’s one of the things in this world that I believe connects us all… And that part won’t happen if I give up. There was no way I would give up. » Φ

]]>
Healthcare workers face continued harassment over COVID precautions https://colinmarshallradio.com/healthcare-workers-face-continued-harassment-over-covid-precautions/ Thu, 29 Sep 2022 00:20:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/healthcare-workers-face-continued-harassment-over-covid-precautions/ When the COVID-19 pandemic hit Montana, people across the state started screaming at a set time most nights to show their support for frontline healthcare workers. COVID-19 cases in the United States and Montana are well below where they peaked earlier this year. However, the virus is still around and healthcare workers say they are […]]]>

When the COVID-19 pandemic hit Montana, people across the state started screaming at a set time most nights to show their support for frontline healthcare workers.

COVID-19 cases in the United States and Montana are well below where they peaked earlier this year. However, the virus is still around and healthcare workers say they are being harassed by patients and family members due to restrictions meant to prevent the spread of the disease.

MTPR’s Freddy Monares spoke with Missoulian reporter David Erickson who recently dug into what Missoula hospitals are to protect patients and staff.

Freddy Monares: What are the rules in hospitals and what are they trying to accomplish?

David Erickson: So, hospitals have put in place a number of protections, programs and restrictions that they initiated during the pandemic, such as requiring masks and limiting the number of people who can be in certain rooms with patients. to the hospital.

Freddy Monares: And it’s meant to prevent the spread of disease, isn’t it?

David Erickson: Exactly. Yes, to reduce cases of transmission, to have fewer people in a room at any given time and also to protect healthcare workers who are in those rooms with patients.

Freddy Monares: And you reported that Providence St. Patrick’s Hospital in Missoula recently posted signage in front of its building warning that physical assault, verbal harassment and abusive language will not be tolerated. What have health care workers who experienced some of this abuse told you?

David Erickson: Beth Hock, who is chief nursing officer at St. Patrick’s Hospital, told me they’ve had a significant increase in incidents like this since the pandemic began. Verbal abuse, harassment, threats, sometimes – very rarely escalating into threats of physical violence – but, to get there. Like nurses and all sorts of hospital staff who face angry visitors and sometimes angry patients who are upset by these restrictions.

Every segment of the hospital staff had to deal with verbal abuse and very angry and emotional visitors and patients.

Freddy Monares: Yeah, you even reported the security guards, didn’t you?

David Erickson: Yes, security guards need to be called and security guards also face these threats. And even, only the staff at the main entrance of the hospital have to deal with this.
Every segment of the hospital staff had to deal with verbal abuse and very angry and emotional visitors and patients.

Freddy Monares: So what are hospitals doing to help staff who find themselves in these situations?

David Erickson: Thus, the two hospitals in Missoula have implemented a number of programs. They’ve always had some kind of de-escalation training to teach these healthcare workers how to de-escalate a situation when someone is very emotional, angry, or upset. And it just helps them prepare in case they find themselves in those situations. But, I think they’ve kind of ramped up those programs during the pandemic, and they’ve put in place a number of protocols for them to call security personnel, and hospital security personnel also, you know, the ability to call law enforcement.

Hospitals are no exception. They were very clear about this. I mean, COVID is something they take very seriously and they don’t let anyone be an exception to those rules.

Freddy Monares: And I think it’s important to note that it’s not people, like getting kicked out of a restaurant or a movie theater, it’s people trying to be with family or friends during times difficult. Are there any exceptions to these rules?

David Erickson: Hospitals are no exception. They were very clear about this. I mean, COVID is something they take very seriously and they don’t let anyone be an exception to those rules. So I think from what it looks like, it led to a lot of those frustrations. A patient or visitor would request an exception, and because they’re emotional, it’s a very stressful time for them.

Freddy Monares: Yeah, I just think so too, the flip side, these medical professionals are trying to keep these same patients safe. Do healthcare workers still suffer from burnout because of these conditions?

David Erickson: Yeah. So, you know, Beth Hock told me that she thinks at least half of the caregivers at the hospital have faced these kinds of threats since the pandemic began — or abuse. And everyone I spoke to for this story said burnout and stress among healthcare workers is at an all-time high. And a number of healthcare workers at both hospitals have quit or quit out of frustration with what they’re up against, because they say that’s not why I got into this business, to make me scream. They came into the industry to help people and take care of people, they knew they would have to deal with emotional people sometimes, but not like that.

Often they are there to see a very sick, seriously ill loved one and they are emotional and want to visit them, and they don’t understand why they can’t all gather in one room to be around the loved one at last moments of their lives.

Freddy Monares: Did anything else stand out from what you heard from hospital workers?

David Erickson: Yeah, just that the hospital leaders I spoke to all understand the frustration that patients and visitors face. You know, it’s the most stressful time of their lives. Often they are there to see a very sick, seriously ill loved one and they are emotional and want to visit them, and they don’t understand why they can’t all gather in one room to be around the loved one at last moments of their lives. And hospital leaders understand that. But at the same time, they have to protect their staff. It is their main duty to protect their staff, to allow these caregivers to continue to care for other patients.

Freddy Monares: David Erickson is a reporter for The Missoulian, which recently covered how Missoula hospitals are training staff to handle threats and abusive behavior. David, thank you for your report.

David Erickson: Thanks a lot.

]]>
Boise State Public Radio Reporter Selected for National Fellowship https://colinmarshallradio.com/boise-state-public-radio-reporter-selected-for-national-fellowship/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 21:12:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/boise-state-public-radio-reporter-selected-for-national-fellowship/ Boise State Public Radio is thrilled to announce Rachel Cohen as 2022-2023 National Science-Health-Environment Fellow (SHERF). Started in 2021, the fellowships are a collaboration of the Association of Health Journalists (AHCJ), the Council for the Advancement of Scientific Writing (ACTS) and the Society of Environmental Journalists (SEJ). Cohen is one of 12 journalists selected for […]]]>

Boise State Public Radio is thrilled to announce Rachel Cohen as 2022-2023 National Science-Health-Environment Fellow (SHERF).

Started in 2021, the fellowships are a collaboration of the Association of Health Journalists (AHCJ), the Council for the Advancement of Scientific Writing (ACTS) and the Society of Environmental Journalists (SEJ). Cohen is one of 12 journalists selected for this year’s cohort.

The program is designed to support early-career journalists pursuing science, health or environmental reporting by providing intensive training, mentoring and networking opportunities while maintaining their regular employment. .

“I am very excited about the many learning opportunities this scholarship will provide and to deepen my understanding of health and environmental issues that are important to people in Idaho,” Cohen said.

She originally joined the Boise State Public Radio News team in 2019 as a Report for America Fellow. Since then, his reporting has won numerous awards and accolades, both locally and nationally. Last year, Cohen won best reporting at the national Edward R. Murrow Awards competition for her story about a Boise nurse who wrote a poem after a particularly trying night during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Rachel has done outstanding reporting on health care and this fellowship will expand and elevate her reporting,” said Sáša Woodruff, news director for Boise State Public Radio. “We are delighted that she has been chosen for this opportunity.”

Funded by the Department of Science Education at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the SHERF Fellowship offers a curriculum in basic science, interpretation of medical studies, data analysis, explanatory evidence-based decisions, understanding climate science and more.

“Today’s science, health or environmental journalist must be able to cover all of these topics well and understand how they intersect with a multitude of social, cultural and political issues,” said Rosalind Reid, Executive Director of ACTS. “This group of extraordinarily accomplished and diverse Fellows will gain important skills, knowledge, and connections to cover critical issues for regional and national audiences.”

]]>
Boston Public Radio Full Show: September 22, 2022 https://colinmarshallradio.com/boston-public-radio-full-show-september-22-2022/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 19:54:59 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/boston-public-radio-full-show-september-22-2022/ Today on Boston Public Radio: We started the show by asking listeners if recent headlines about former President Donald Trump will affect the public’s perception of him. Susan Zalkind provided insight into his years of investigating a 2011 triple homicide in Waltham, Mass. – which, despite its brutality and its links to the Boston Marathon […]]]>

Today on Boston Public Radio:

We started the show by asking listeners if recent headlines about former President Donald Trump will affect the public’s perception of him.

Susan Zalkind provided insight into his years of investigating a 2011 triple homicide in Waltham, Mass. – which, despite its brutality and its links to the Boston Marathon bombing, remains unsolved – and its recent adaptation into a documentary series. Zalkind is a freelance journalist, writer and producer. A documentary series based on his reporting, “Murders Before the Marathon”, was released on Hulu.

Andrea Cabral discussed former President Trump’s latest legal troubles and the release of Adnan Syed after two decades in prison, the subject of the “Serial” podcast launched in 2014. Cabral is the county’s former sheriff and public safety secretary of Suffolk, and former CEO of cannabis company Ascend.

Sue O’Connell shared his thoughts on the apparent spike in heating prices and Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene’s pledge to introduce articles of impeachment against President Joe Biden. O’Connell is co-editor of Bay Windows and South End News, and contributor to Current on NBC LX and NECN.

Paul Reville spoke about how Biden’s student loan cancellation plan will affect residents of Mass., schools boycotting US News Ratings and responded to a Atlantic coin raising the question of whether the United States should postpone the schooling of boys by a year.

Meredith Goldstein and Sara Farizan joined us to talk about Farizan’s new book, “My Buddy, Killer Croc,” a young adult novel under the DC umbrella, and then Goldstein talked about the latest edition of his column: “I have a crush on a fictional character. I don’t know how to find true love. Goldstein is a feature writer for the Boston Globe, where she writes the “Love Letters” column and hosts the “Love Letters” podcast. author of several award-winning young adult novels, his most recent, “My Buddy, Killer Croc,” a mid-level graphic novel from DC Comics, was released on September 6.

We ended the show by asking listeners what they think about using human remains as compost.

]]>
Boston Public Radio Full Show: September 20, 2022 https://colinmarshallradio.com/boston-public-radio-full-show-september-20-2022/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 20:07:32 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/boston-public-radio-full-show-september-20-2022/ Today on Boston Public Radio: We started the show by asking listeners about President Joe Biden’s recent assertion that the pandemic is “over.” Trenni Casey talked about the latest from the WNBA, Robert Sarver’s suspension from the NBA, the niche ultramarathon community, and the latest from Tom Brady. Casey is a reporter and anchor for […]]]>

Today on Boston Public Radio:

We started the show by asking listeners about President Joe Biden’s recent assertion that the pandemic is “over.”

Trenni Casey talked about the latest from the WNBA, Robert Sarver’s suspension from the NBA, the niche ultramarathon community, and the latest from Tom Brady. Casey is a reporter and anchor for NBC Sports Boston, and a weekly Boston Public Radio donor.

Suffolk County District Attorney Kevin Hayden spoke about his primary victory and the contentious election that led to it, as well as the future of his office, including how they will deal with a slew of hate protests in the city, his firing of the chief of his juvenile detention unit and the alleged MBTA Transit Police cover-up.

Corby Kummer talked about the legacy of “Two Buck Chuck” after the death of its creator Fred Franzia, a new, energy-efficient way to cook pasta, and shared some notable Boston-area restaurants. Kummer is executive director of the food and societal policy program at the Aspen Institute, managing editor at The Atlantic, and senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.

Jared Bowen spoke about the closure of “The Phantom of the Opera” on Broadway as well as the theater community’s greatest challenges after years of COVID-19, and shared his thoughts on “Heroes of the Fourth Turning” at Speakeasy Stage and “Fabulation”, playing at the lyrical scene. Bowen is GBH’s executive art editor and host of Open workshop.

John King spoke about the latest political headlines, including some Republican candidates’ reluctance to accept their election results, former President Donald Trump’s recent QAnon endorsement, and Florida Governor Ron DeSantis’ political motivations behind the theft of dozens of Venezuelan migrants to Martha’s Vineyard. King is CNN’s chief national correspondent and anchor for “Inside Politics,” which airs weekdays and Sundays at 8 a.m.

We ended the show by asking listeners to talk about their memories of “Two Buck Chuck.”

]]>
Costumes to save Confederate icons abandoned in South Carolina https://colinmarshallradio.com/costumes-to-save-confederate-icons-abandoned-in-south-carolina/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 19:10:53 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/costumes-to-save-confederate-icons-abandoned-in-south-carolina/ CHARLESTON, SC (AP) — Lawsuits filed to stop the removal of memorials to Confederate leaders and a pro-slavery congressman in a South Carolina town have been dropped. Post and courier reports that the American Heritage Association helped fund one of the trials. It had been deposed by descendants of John C. Calhoun, a former congressman […]]]>

CHARLESTON, SC (AP) — Lawsuits filed to stop the removal of memorials to Confederate leaders and a pro-slavery congressman in a South Carolina town have been dropped.

Post and courier reports that the American Heritage Association helped fund one of the trials. It had been deposed by descendants of John C. Calhoun, a former congressman and vice president who died before the Civil War, opposing the city of Charleston’s removal of Calhoun’s statue.

The association had also filed a lawsuit over the removal of a Robert E. Lee Memorial Highway marker from the campus of a charter school in Charleston and the renaming of an auditorium that had been named after Christopher Memminger, Swiss Treasury Secretary.

The stone and metal monument to Confederate General Lee was removed in July 2021 and placed in storage.

The city has reached an agreement with the South Carolina State Museum to take Calhoun’s statue.

Both lawsuits were filed in state court. The road marker and auditorium lawsuit was dropped on September 13. Calhoun’s lawsuit was dropped on September 15, the newspaper reported.

AHA President Brett Barry declined to comment on the status of Calhoun’s case, despite the descendants’ request for dismissal.

“Charleston’s landmarks are an integral part of the city’s American historical and artistic landscape,” Barry told the Post and Courier. “The American Heritage Association and members of the Calhoun family look forward to commenting on the destruction of the monument of U.S. Vice President Calhoun and the associated lawsuit in the weeks ahead.”

Opponents of Lee’s memorial removal had accused the city of violating the state heritage law, which protects certain monuments.

“As city prosecutors have made clear from the beginning, there was never a violation of heritage law,” City of Charleston spokesman Jack O’Toole said. at the Post and Courier on September 16. “And now that those lawsuits have been dropped, the city can start moving forward again with plans to have those historic items displayed in an appropriate public setting here in our state.

]]>
Trombonist Steve Turre links ‘Generations’ on his new album https://colinmarshallradio.com/trombonist-steve-turre-links-generations-on-his-new-album/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 21:35:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/trombonist-steve-turre-links-generations-on-his-new-album/ As some people say about music education, “You can’t teach jazz, but you box learn it.” Trombonist Steve Tourre learned on the bandstand with legends like Art Blakey, Ray Charles, McCoy Tyner and more. Released today, Turre’s album Generations honors alumni while passing the art on to a new generation of jazz musicians. Turre grew […]]]>

As some people say about music education, “You can’t teach jazz, but you box learn it.” Trombonist Steve Tourre learned on the bandstand with legends like Art Blakey, Ray Charles, McCoy Tyner and more. Released today, Turre’s album Generations honors alumni while passing the art on to a new generation of jazz musicians.

Turre grew up playing salsa, blues and jazz in the San Francisco area. Arriving on the New York jazz scene in the early 70s, he became a frontline trombonist with some of the best musicians of the time. The avant-garde multi-instrumentalist Rahsaan Roland Kirk introduced Turre to the game of shells, and he is now the world’s greatest shell player in jazz.

Saturday Night Live fans have heard his trombone and seen his signature beard with that show’s band since 1982. His more than 20 albums as a leader and countless recordings as a sideman show a pioneering virtuoso who made his mark and more. types of music over his nearly 60-year career.

Turre’s group on Generations includes emerging talents like the pianist Isaiah J. Thompsonsaxophonist Emilio Modeste, bassist Corcoran Holt and a pair of literal second-generation musicians. Trumpeter Wallace Roney Jr’s late father was a frequent Turre collaborator, and his son Orion Turre is the band’s drummer.

During Generationsthis talented quintet is joined by some of today’s finest veteran jazzmen such as saxophonist James Carterdrummer Lenny White, guitarist Ed Cherry and percussionist Pedro Martinez. Turre’s combination of youth and experience gives him equal parts enthusiastic energy and the wisdom of decades speaking the language of jazz.

Steve Turre with his trombone and the New York skyline

The songs Turre features on Generations nod to influential musicians throughout his career. The album’s opening song “Planting the Ceed” pays homage to pianist Cedar Walton who played with Turre in Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers. It’s a muscular hard bop swinger with a sinuous solo from Modeste and a bold, melodic statement from the bandleader’s trombone. Roney Jr’s trumpet solo is confident and flowing and Thompson’s piano solo recalls Walton’s love of progressive yet soulful modern bop.

One of Turre’s earliest influences is showcased on “Dinner with Duke.” The future trombone star was in eighth grade when he first saw Ellington in concert with guests Coleman Hawkins and Ella Fitzgerald. The ballad’s beautiful melody is a fitting tribute to the concert that helped inspire a career.

Generations includes African, Latin and reggae rhythms as well as blues. Turre also doubles up on trombone and his musical conch on “Flower Power,” an extended piece with his young quintet featuring Lenny White on drums.

Steve Turre celebrated his 74th birthday earlier this week. Generations connects the past, present and future of jazz and shows that Turre is an important part of everyone as he supports and builds on the jazz community.

]]>
The auction for Payette Lake Island attracts few buyers https://colinmarshallradio.com/the-auction-for-payette-lake-island-attracts-few-buyers/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 23:07:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/the-auction-for-payette-lake-island-attracts-few-buyers/ The auction for a state-owned island at the north end of Payette Lake ended without much action on Wednesday with only one of five Cougar Island lots sold. The auction only lasted a few minutes, with the current tenant of the only developed lot on Cougar Island bidding on the property. Jim Laski, a Bellevue […]]]>

The auction for a state-owned island at the north end of Payette Lake ended without much action on Wednesday with only one of five Cougar Island lots sold.

The auction only lasted a few minutes, with the current tenant of the only developed lot on Cougar Island bidding on the property.

Jim Laski, a Bellevue attorney, paid $2 million for the land.

He declined an interview with Boise State Public Radio on Wednesday. But in comments before the state land board in June, he said the property has meant a lot to his family since he started renting it about 10 years ago.

“Since then, my family and I have spent as much time as possible during the summer enjoying the island and the unique beauty that an Idaho mountain lake has to offer,” Laski told the ‘era.

During that hearing earlier this summer, he explained how he had been trying to buy the land under his house for two years, spending thousands of dollars in the process to comply with the state program.

Lanski had warned that his funding for the lot could fail if state officials did not hold the auction in August. According to the McCall Star-News, he told city council members last month that he was “skeptical” about his ability to close the deal.

“I think you’re going to be dealing with a new owner after September 14,” Lanski said, according to the newspaper.

The other four Cougar Island lots were not sold. In total, the entire 14.2-acre island was valued at $10.3 million.

It’s unclear what will happen to them — an Idaho Department of Lands spokesperson said the agency will assess its next steps.

The Payette Land Trust has raised $1.2 million in an attempt to buy adjacent lots on Cougar Island to halt further development and protect the water quality of the lake, but he made no bids on any of the plots.

The island is part of the state’s endowment land portfolio, the proceeds of which are used to fund public education.

Follow James Dawson on Twitter @RadioDawson for more local news.

Copyright 2022 Boise State Public Radio

]]>
Soaring electricity bills are the latest inflation flashpoint https://colinmarshallradio.com/soaring-electricity-bills-are-the-latest-inflation-flashpoint/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 09:00:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/soaring-electricity-bills-are-the-latest-inflation-flashpoint/ Updated September 13, 2022 8:41 a.m. ET Inflation has eased a bit in the last month, thanks in part to falling gas prices, but for many families there is another major pressure on their family budget: soaring utility bills. electricity. Take Bernice Brown, a retiree from Tuscaloosa, Alabama. In July and August, his electricity bill […]]]>

Updated September 13, 2022 8:41 a.m. ET

Inflation has eased a bit in the last month, thanks in part to falling gas prices, but for many families there is another major pressure on their family budget: soaring utility bills. electricity.

Take Bernice Brown, a retiree from Tuscaloosa, Alabama. In July and August, his electricity bill exceeded $400.

“It was damaging to be honest,” she says.

But she can’t do much about it.

“The heat here is awful,” she says, noting that her neighborhood near the University of Alabama campus doesn’t have many shade trees. “Houses are just sitting, cooking.”

A report from the Department of Labor on Tuesday shows that the country’s annual inflation rate fell to 8.3% in August from 8.5% in July. But many families are still struggling with the rising cost of groceries, rent and other essentials like electricity.

Loading…

Electricity prices have jumped 15.8% over the past year, mainly due to the high price of natural gas, which is used to generate almost 40% of the country’s electricity.

Rising electricity prices were compounded by soaring temperatures, which meant air conditioners continued to work overtime.

“It was one heat wave after another,” said Mark Wolfe, executive director of the National Energy Assistance Directors Association. “Families need to use air conditioning to stay safe.”

NEADA estimates the cooling costs of an average family went from $450 last summer to around $600 This year.

six months of summer

Dale Cooper’s electric bills in Phoenix are even higher.

“We have six months of summer with over 100 degree heat,” says Cooper, who earns $13.50 an hour as a restaurant cashier. “If I didn’t have roommates, I couldn’t earn with the salary I have.”

While Cooper, who is 59, will likely benefit from reduced utility costs during Phoenix’s mild winter, residents of colder parts of the country are likely to face significantly higher heating bills. .

Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

/

AFP via Getty Images

A plane takes off from Los Angeles International Airport (LAX), with power lines visible at sunset as California’s independent system operator announced a statewide power flex alert urging conservation to avoid power outages in El Segundo, California on August 31.

NEADA predicts the average family will pay $1,202 to heat their home this winter, 17% more than last year. For the six out of 10 families whose heating comes from natural gas, the increase in heating costs could be 34%.

“There’s no sign that those prices are going down,” Wolfe says. “All signs point to higher home heating costs, and they could spike if it’s cold.”

NEADA says more than 20 million families have fallen behind on their utility bills and the average amount they owe has risen to $792, nearly double what it was before the pandemic.

“It’s not about whether families heat and cool their homes responsibly,” Wolfe says. “Families do this. They turn the heating down as low as they can. They use air conditioning sparingly. It’s just that the cost of heating and cooling the home has gone up so much that low-income families are struggling to pay those bills.”

Other costs still sting

Heating and cooling bills come on top of rising costs for other essentials like housing and food. Housing costs rose 6.2% for the year to August, while grocery store prices jumped 13.5%.

Loading…

“To get decent, healthy food, the prices are extremely high,” Brown said in Tuscaloosa.

That keeps the Federal Reserve on its toes, even as headline inflation was tempered last month by the sharp decline in gasoline prices. Gasoline prices fell nearly 40 cents a gallon in August to $3.84, according to the American Automobile Association.

Gas prices are among the most visible in the country and often have a disproportionate psychological impact. As pump prices have fallen, Americans’ concerns about inflation have also eased somewhat.

A new NPR/PBS news time/Marist survey finds that inflation is the number one concern for 30% of adults this fall, up from 37% in July.

Despite lower gasoline prices, Fed officials still say they are unhappy with the return of headline inflation to their 2% target.

“I got burned last year,” Fed Governor Christopher Waller said in a speech last week.

He noted that inflation appeared to have eased last summer for prices to take off again in the fall.

“We’re very careful about getting burned again,” Waller said. “So it must be a real and permanent longer-term decline than what happened last year.”

The Fed is expected to raise interest rates by 0.75 percentage points next week and keep borrowing costs high until authorities are satisfied that prices, including for essentials like electricity , are under control.

Copyright 2022 NPR. To learn more, visit https://www.npr.org.

]]>
France, Germany and Britain urge Iran to renew nuclear deal https://colinmarshallradio.com/france-germany-and-britain-urge-iran-to-renew-nuclear-deal/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 17:05:03 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/france-germany-and-britain-urge-iran-to-renew-nuclear-deal/ FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — France, Germany and Britain have urged Iran to accept a proposal to revive the deal limiting its nuclear program, saying final texts of a deal have been prepared but that Iran “chose not to seize this critical diplomatic opportunity.” The three European governments said in a joint statement on Saturday that […]]]>

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — France, Germany and Britain have urged Iran to accept a proposal to revive the deal limiting its nuclear program, saying final texts of a deal have been prepared but that Iran “chose not to seize this critical diplomatic opportunity.”

The three European governments said in a joint statement on Saturday that Iran had instead raised “separate issues” and “continued to escalate its nuclear program well beyond any plausible civilian justification.”

The statement comes amid efforts to revive the 2015 nuclear deal, known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, which eased sanctions on Iran in exchange for curbs on its nuclear program. The United States unilaterally withdrew from the accord in 2018 under then-President Donald Trump and reimposed sanctions on Iran, prompting Tehran to begin backing away from the terms of the deal.

The UN’s atomic watchdog said on Wednesday it believed Iran had further increased its stockpile of highly enriched uranium to a short technical step from weapons-grade levels.

Iran sent a written response last week in talks on a final draft roadmap for the parties to return to the nuclear deal in tatters, though the United States questioned Tehran’s offer . Neither side gave details of the contents.

]]>