Radio station – Colin Marshall Radio http://colinmarshallradio.com/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 11:09:52 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://colinmarshallradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-1-1-120x120.png Radio station – Colin Marshall Radio http://colinmarshallradio.com/ 32 32 How a Low Power Phoenix Community Radio Station Provides “an Institution for the Uninstitutional” https://colinmarshallradio.com/how-a-low-power-phoenix-community-radio-station-provides-an-institution-for-the-uninstitutional/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 18:17:42 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/how-a-low-power-phoenix-community-radio-station-provides-an-institution-for-the-uninstitutional/ A few miles from my house was KDIF 102.9 FM, a low power FM station in South Phoenix. My ride to the station took me from the prosperous and developing areas of Phoenix to the neglected areas of southern Phoenix. The streets and businesses changed the further south I drove, but my radio picked up […]]]>

A few miles from my house was KDIF 102.9 FM, a low power FM station in South Phoenix. My ride to the station took me from the prosperous and developing areas of Phoenix to the neglected areas of southern Phoenix. The streets and businesses changed the further south I drove, but my radio picked up the sound of live DJs spinning their favorite funk records instead of the religious syndicated satellite radio station. I entered KDIF thinking that I would focus my thesis on the station’s transition to digital media, but realized that KDIF and community radio were doing something more important than going digital. KDIF created a sense of belonging, and it’s something the people of South Phoenix needed.

I study human communication and spend a lot of time explaining how communication is not quite the same as journalism. My research has focused on social movements and digital media. My masters thesis was on the Muslim Brotherhood English website and my interest in how groups use digital media to foster social movements. My time in the Peace Corps and volunteering for various arts and community organizations inspired me to take an interest in volunteer work. I visited KDIF as part of a short course on research methods, thinking it would be a quick project. But I realized that community radio work was a way to connect my interests in media, volunteering, social movements, and community building.

However, the most compelling lesson I learned from the artists and volunteers at KDIF was how they would use community radio to build a different future for South Phoenix. The region has faced a long history of discrimination and neglect. If you’ve ever heard of the term “environmental racism” – the idea that groups facing racial discrimination are forced to go to environmentally unsafe places – the early research that developed the term used South Phoenix as an example. South Phoenix’s current “development” plans focus on bringing in wealthy new residents and businesses while failing to invest in those already there. Local media cover some of the issues facing South Phoenix, but often portray the area as a desperate place of crime and poverty. National or syndicated broadcast stations focus on news, talk and music with national rather than local interests. The broadcast media don’t let them speak or represent them, so it’s no surprise that the people of South Phoenix feel estranged from radio.

Phoenix music critics complain that most radio stations use the same playlists. DJ Balo agrees. “There is a whole world of music, and people only hear a small part of it,” said Balo, former host of Around Da Music on KDIF and now owner of the Phoenix radio station WUBI. “If the music isn’t really new or in the 2% of old songs approved by big business, it’s not on the radio. “

I think about how Anjelica, a DJ who co-hosted the all-vinyl show Rosewax vinyl club, talked about having the kind of music on the radio “where you can play grandmothers, mothers and daughters together”. Commercial radio often segments by age groups, but community radio like KDIF avoids segmentation in favor of rapprochement.

KDIF’s goal is not just local but hyperlocal. As a low-power FM station, KDIF has a broadcast radius of approximately three miles. Its FCC license requires it to stream a certain amount of locally produced content each day. “Locally produced” means that the content must be produced within 10 miles (10 km) of the station. KDIF is licensed to use 102.9 as the broadcast frequency, but the low power license does not protect KDIF from interference from a commercial radio station with the same frequency.

In 2000, the FCC licensed a new class of radio stations called Low Power FM Stations (LPFMs) with the aim of serving small communities and under-represented groups. Media reformers across the political spectrum had argued that consolidating the media in a few hands homogenized radio, and this homogenization reduced the effectiveness of radio as an outlet for local communities.

The LPFM designation was immediately opposed by commercial and public broadcasters, and lobbying on behalf of commercial radio and NPR in Congress helped stifle LPFM’s growth. Many lawmakers, including the late Arizona Senator John McCain, have spent nearly a decade struggling to define how the LPFM works. When the Local Community Radio Act of 2010 allowed more LPFM stations to broadcast, organizers in Phoenix requested space on the dial. In 2013, the group that would become KDIF obtained an LPFM license to broadcast in southern Phoenix and parts of downtown Phoenix. These organizers believed that radio had a unique power that was most effective when linked to a particular geography and people.

Community radio brings people together by helping local people discuss local issues. For example, a high school in southern Phoenix found that its predominantly white teachers had difficulty understanding how non-white students used slurs and slurs among their friends. The students teamed up with the station’s executive director, Franco Hernandez, to create a radio show where they could work on issues. The show allowed students to voice their concerns about the loss of their language community, and they were challenged to consider how their language creates complexity around racial issues. The radio amplified their perspectives and provided nuances that did not occur in face-to-face conversations. The immediacy of the radio broadcast forced teachers to focus on the students as they spoke. KDIF changed the power dynamic between students and used radio to solve a problem in their high school. National unionized programs cannot solve problems at the local high school.

Community radio is a space where people who lack power, access or agency can talk to those in power, and community radio is the place where a community can talk with itself.

KDIF taught me how community radio fills a need that business advocacy and digital audio won’t completely replace. Community radio is a space where people who lack power, access or agency can talk to those in power, and community radio is the place where a community can talk with itself. “Hearing people like us on the radio when you walk into a restaurant or an auto store,” says Hernandez, “makes you feel like South Phoenix is ​​yours too. The power of radio is to create a sense of belonging, and community radio like KDIF supports belonging where other stations falter.

Commercial radio creates fantastic programming, but nationalizing many commercial stations takes as much away the local character as a chain restaurant. Public radio supports great local work, but public radio has a complex relationship with localism. Christina Dunbar-Hester, author of Low power to the people, argues that public radio lobbyists have removed the distinction between content intended for locals and stations controlled by locals. Dunbar-Hester acknowledges the comments made by public radio officials in favor of the local media, but his research recognizes that the public radio position supports the same practices of nationalizing and consolidating commercial radio. College stations are raising new voices, but college radio ignores people over 25. Community radio is not a threat to any of them. It exists as a place for people who don’t have a place in the media, and they should have a part of the airwaves for their church, their school, their little group of people.

KDIF is an institution for those without an institution. Sunday service, a show that is no longer on the air, spent every Sunday morning pumping funk, soul and hip-hop for sweet walks through the avenues of South Phoenix. “There are organizations and places to go [to] in South Phoenix, “said a KDIF staff member,” but they only welcome you if you fit some kind of respectability. If you are a kid, don’t like church or sports, and you don’t have the right background, then there isn’t much for you. I sat in the studio with all kinds of people, the kind of people who didn’t fit in other places, gently nodding my head on the bass. Their fellowship was no less valid than the religious services held in neighboring churches on Sunday mornings, and Sunday service connected the people of South Phoenix with each other and with people around the world. Community radio is not only broadcast, but a sense of belonging.

A sense of belonging or connection comes through community radio, but community radio struggles to keep that feeling for long. KDIF hosts and staff are all unpaid volunteers. Sunday service ceased its broadcasts after the departure of its hosts, but the Sunday morning time slot remains an active place for new shows and programming. Two of the three hosts of Rosewax vinyl club passed away recently, but their memory survives KDIF. Hernandez and a local artist transformed the KDIF lounge into the La Dama Community Lounge, a welcoming space where friends and family of DJs can relax while the DJs put on their shows. Community radio is a place where belonging and change often go hand in hand.

A friend told me that most people study something either because they want to fix the world or because they want to fix themselves. I studied community radio because I thought I could “fix” this station. Every afternoon or evening when I came home from watching a show or a long budget meeting, I tapped into KDIF until the peaceful mix of reggae turned into a shrill monologue from the syndicated religious station that shares the frequency. by KDIF. The hard part of listening to KDIF was that moment where belonging and closeness to a hyperlocal station that I felt was subsumed by a national station that didn’t care about me. I wanted this sense of community, a place where I fit in, to last a little longer. I came seeking to understand belonging, but realized that I also needed a place to belong. KDIF gave me this in a way that no radio station has done for a long time, and belonging is something every radio listener deserves.

Ian Derk is Senior Lecturer in Communication at the College of Integrative Sciences and Arts at Arizona State University. He teaches popular culture and graphic novels. His research explores the link between sound and community activism. He can be contacted at iderk@asu.edu. You can find KDIF 102.9 online and follow him on Instagram.



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SABC Sport goes missing as Robert Marawa joins the commercial radio station! https://colinmarshallradio.com/sabc-sport-goes-missing-as-robert-marawa-joins-the-commercial-radio-station/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 08:38:56 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/sabc-sport-goes-missing-as-robert-marawa-joins-the-commercial-radio-station/ Loyal SABC Sport the public will be NOT have the opportunity to listen Robert marawa on one of the public broadcaster’s platforms. READ | BAFANA BAFANA LATEST | MARK FISH DOUBTS FIFA RULES IN FAVOR OF SAFA This despite the efforts of a number of prominent figures for the reintegration of Marawa into the SABC. […]]]>

Loyal SABC Sport the public will be NOT have the opportunity to listen Robert marawa on one of the public broadcaster’s platforms.

READ | BAFANA BAFANA LATEST | MARK FISH DOUBTS FIFA RULES IN FAVOR OF SAFA

This despite the efforts of a number of prominent figures for the reintegration of Marawa into the SABC.

Poet Mzwakhe Mbuli and former Kaizer Chiefs Fees Moloi striker earlier this week revealed plans to shut down SABC in a bid to force the public broadcaster to rehire Marawa.

READ | THE EX-ORLANDO PIRATES STAR PHUNGWAYO WILL STAY BEHIND THE BARS UNTIL NEXT WEEK!

Marawa was fired from the SABC via text message in July this year, and the veteran sports reporter maintains his firing has nothing to do with his job.

He has now switched to commercial radio, joining Vuma FM which broadcasts simultaneously on Rise FM and SowetanLIVE, and his new sports show will be available on all three platforms.

READ | MAMELODI SUNDOWNS SIGNS RHULANI MOKWENA BLACK POISON TEAM STARLET

All three companies are owned by Arena Holdings, which will certainly gain more audiences with Marawa now on board.

Marawa will host its own sports show, Marawa Sports Worldwide, between 5:30 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. Monday through Friday.

WATCH | KAIZER CHIEFS LEGEND Reaches Out to Orland Pirates’ Icon – Photos

Marawa shared the news of his return to radio with his followers on Twitter on Friday and confirmed that his brand new show will air on Monday, November 22, 2021.



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]]> Former airwave personality sues Kelowna radio station – Summerland Review https://colinmarshallradio.com/former-airwave-personality-sues-kelowna-radio-station-summerland-review/ Wed, 17 Nov 2021 22:30:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/former-airwave-personality-sues-kelowna-radio-station-summerland-review/
A former on-air Kelowna radio host who previously worked for CKLZ FM, Jim Pattison Broadcast Group and the Pattison Media organization, is suing the owners and several employees for allegedly fostering a toxic and misogynistic work environment. Suzanne Milne, who portrayed an on-air character named Sue Tyler, started working at CKLZ FM – also known […]]]>

A former on-air Kelowna radio host who previously worked for CKLZ FM, Jim Pattison Broadcast Group and the Pattison Media organization, is suing the owners and several employees for allegedly fostering a toxic and misogynistic work environment.

Suzanne Milne, who portrayed an on-air character named Sue Tyler, started working at CKLZ FM – also known as The Lizard 104.7 – in April 2014, while operating as Power 104.7 at the time.

In a civil lawsuit filed in the British Columbia Supreme Court in Kelowna on November 15, Milne explains how she was hired to play her character as Sue Tyler at the station, which she created over a 30-year period at the radio.

She noted that the character was designed specifically “to appeal to a male population between the ages of 18 and 40” and “to push the boundaries of female sexuality.”

“Sue Tyler’s character would dress provocatively for public appearances and use sexualized tone and innuendo in her radio shows to specifically and successfully appeal to this target demographic and exemplify women’s sexual empowerment,” said the civil suit.

According to court documents, the male staff of CKLZ FM “did not differentiate between Milne and the character of Sue Tyler” and found it appropriate to speak to and treat her in a demeaning and sexist manner due to the sexual and confident nature of her character.

The toxic and misogynistic work environment at CKLZ FM, Milne said, was a culture encouraged and promoted by the station’s owners, Jim Pattison Broadcast Group (JPBG) and Pattison Media, as well as general manager Karl Johnston.

Milne alleges that alcohol consumption and intoxication at work was “common, acceptable and encouraged”. Court documents claim that sexualized comments and innuendoes by male employees towards female employees were acceptable and encouraged both on and off the air.

When she reportedly lodged formal complaints about a toxic work environment at Johnston, she said her concerns fell on deaf ears as Johnston “supported, promoted and participated in the inappropriate work culture.”

In August 2019, Milne was suffering from shingles and alleges that Johnston made jokes and publicly suggested that his condition was in fact gonorrhea.

In November 2020, Milne communicated his concerns via email to JPBG and Pattison Media owner Rod Schween, which led to Schween hosting a mandatory sensitivity training course for all CKLZ employees and management. .

Despite the training, Milne says the male employees joked about “how ridiculous the training was,” which ultimately escalated the behavior. It was around this time that she said Johnston asked her to “tone down” the character of Sue Tyler and “be a good mom” instead, with no more sexualized content on the air.

After two weeks of COVID-19 isolation requirements, Milne said she only returned to work one day “before having to start medical leave triggered by returning to a toxic workplace.”

She is currently on long-term medical leave and has not returned to broadcasting.

In the lawsuit, she said toxic work conduct resulted in a number of mental suffering, including depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder and suicidal thoughts.

As a result, she said she believed she would no longer be able to work in broadcasting and the trauma had forced her into early retirement. She seeks unspecified damages from the six defendants.

Neither Pattison nor the defendants responded to the request and denied commenting.

None of the allegations have been proven in court.


@aaron_hemens
aaron.hemens@kelownacapnews.com
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Okanagan



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]]> WHMI 93.5 FM radio station – Livingston County Michigan News, weather, traffic, sports, school updates and the best classic hit https://colinmarshallradio.com/whmi-93-5-fm-radio-station-livingston-county-michigan-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hit-5/ Sat, 13 Nov 2021 17:52:21 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/whmi-93-5-fm-radio-station-livingston-county-michigan-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hit-5/
Thongbun Rattankun / iStock (NEW YORK) – As the COVID-19 pandemic swept the world, more than 5 million people have died from the disease worldwide, including more than 758,000 Americans, according to real-time data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Johns Hopkins University Engineering. Only 68.5% of Americans aged 12 and older are […]]]>
Thongbun Rattankun / iStock

(NEW YORK) – As the COVID-19 pandemic swept the world, more than 5 million people have died from the disease worldwide, including more than 758,000 Americans, according to real-time data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Johns Hopkins University Engineering.

Only 68.5% of Americans aged 12 and older are fully vaccinated against COVID-19, according to data from the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Here is how the news is evolving. Every hour in the East:

November 13, 12:43 p.m.
Aaron Rodgers meets return to play post-quarantine requirements: reports

Aaron Rodgers has remained asymptomatic from COVID-19 and has followed NFL / NFLPA return-to-play protocols, ESPN reported.

“It went really well,” Green Bay Packers coach Matt LaFleur said this week, according to ESPN. “The communication has been there. He’s been in every meeting. He’s been engaged. So, it’s just that he’s not with his guys on the pitch.”

Rodgers tested positive for COVID-19 on November 3 and had to undergo a 10-day quarantine. The Packers, Rodgers and wide receiver Allen Lazard have all been fined for violating protocols jointly agreed upon by the NFL and NFL Players Association, ESPN reported.

November 12, 8:33 p.m.
4 states set to recommend COVID-19 recall for all adults

As COVID-19 cases increase across the country, at least four states are preparing to recommend booster shots for all adults before federal authorization.

Colorado Governor Jared Polis on Thursday signed an executive order declaring the entire state at high risk for COVID-19, making all fully vaccinated adults eligible to receive a booster.

“We want to make sure Coloradians have all the tools they need to protect themselves from this deadly virus and to help reduce stress on our hospitals and healthcare workers,” Polis said in a statement.

Any Coloradan aged 18 and over who is at least six months after the second dose of Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna vaccine, or two months after the single dose Johnson & Johnson vaccine, can now be boosted.

“I was relieved to have the recall two weeks ago,” Polis said, “and I strongly encourage you to do so too.”

The governor of New Mexico issued a similar order on Friday, and officials in California and West Virginia have already encouraged residents to receive a recall.

Meanwhile, Pfizer on Tuesday asked the Federal Drug Administration for recall authorization for all adults.

November 12, 6:18 p.m.
US cases up nearly 20% since mid-October

The United States currently averages about 76,000 new cases of COVID-19 per day, up nearly 20% since mid-October, according to an ABC News analysis of federal data.

North Dakota now has the highest infection rate in the country, followed by Minnesota, Alaska and Vermont.

Nationwide COVID-19 hospitalizations also increased for the fourth day in a row on Friday. More than 47,000 patients with COVID-19 are currently receiving care.

-Arielle Mitropoulos from ABC News

November 12, 7:06 am
Colorado approves COVID-19 recall for all adults

Colorado Governor Jared Polis on Thursday signed an executive order declaring the entire state at high risk for COVID-19, making all fully vaccinated adults eligible to receive a booster.

“We want to make sure Coloradians have all the tools they need to protect themselves from this deadly virus and to help reduce stress on our hospitals and healthcare workers,” Polis said in a statement.

Any Coloradan aged 18 and over who is at least six months after the second dose of Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna vaccine, or two months after the single dose Johnson & Johnson vaccine, can now be boosted.

“I was relieved to have the recall two weeks ago,” Polis said, “and I strongly encourage you to do so too.”

November 11 2:26 p.m.
COVID-related hospitalizations in the United States increase for 3rd consecutive day

Thursday marked the third day in a row that hospitalizations for COVID have increased nationwide.

Fourteen states reported a 10% increase in hospital admissions over the past week. The states are Arizona, Colorado, Connecticut, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Utah, Vermont and Wisconsin.

Total hospitalizations are down nearly 55% since mid-August.

November 10, 9:21 p.m.
COVID-19 deaths expected to continue to decline in coming weeks

The COVID-19 forecast models used by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention currently predict that the number of weekly deaths will likely continue to decline in the weeks to come, although thousands of Americans are still expected to lose their lives.

The overall model predicts that just under 15,000 additional virus-related deaths will occur in the United States over the next two weeks, with a total of around 781,500 deaths by December 4.

The model estimates that 13 states and territories in the United States have a more than 50% chance of having more deaths in the next two weeks compared to the past two weeks.

November 10, 9:15 p.m.
Federal judge overturns Texas ban on school mask warrants

A federal judge ruled Wednesday that the executive order of Texas Governor Greg Abbott banning local warrants for masks, including in schools, violated the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Since the order was issued in late July, State Attorney General Ken Paxton has sued more than a dozen school districts for issuing mask warrants, according to the court judge’s ruling. of U.S. District Lee Yeakel. In August, the Texas advocacy group Disability Rights filed a lawsuit against the state on behalf of several students with disabilities at increased risk of COVID-19, alleging it was denying them equal access to in-person learning.

“The evidence presented by the applicants establishes that applicants are denied the benefits of in-person learning on an equal basis with their peers without disabilities,” Yeakel wrote in its decision.

Yeakel also said the executive order “interferes with the ability of local school districts to meet their obligations under the ADA” by giving all authority to the governor.

Yeakel urged the state to enforce the mask warrant ban and ordered the plaintiffs to recover their legal costs from the state.

Paxton said the state “protects the rights and freedoms” of residents by banning mask warrants.

November 10, 6:43 p.m.
States Continue Mandate to Immunize Healthcare Workers

Ten states are suing the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services over the Biden administration’s vaccination mandate targeting healthcare workers.

About 17 million healthcare workers who are employed in CMS-funded locations are due to be vaccinated by January 4, 2022. They do not have the opportunity to get tested.

“The warrant is a blatant attempt to federalize public health issues involving immunization that fall within the purview of state policing,” said the complaint, which was filed by Missouri Attorney General Eric Schmitt, a Republican candidate for the Senate.

The attorneys general of Nebraska, Arkansas, Kansas, Iowa, Wyoming, Alaska, South Dakota, North Dakota and New Hampshire have joined the lawsuit, which is the ‘one of many filed against different parts of the Biden administration’s vaccine demands, but the first to target the healthcare worker mandate.

Twenty-six states are pursuing the mandate that applies to businesses, while a further handful are pursuing the mandate of federal workers. Last week, a federal court temporarily blocked the commercial vaccine rule.

Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.


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Armistice signed in Aotearoa and in the Pacific https://colinmarshallradio.com/armistice-signed-in-aotearoa-and-in-the-pacific/ https://colinmarshallradio.com/armistice-signed-in-aotearoa-and-in-the-pacific/#respond Wed, 10 Nov 2021 20:13:43 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/armistice-signed-in-aotearoa-and-in-the-pacific/ Photo: Getty Images. Adam gifford Derek Fox: Armistice is marked in Aotearoa and the Pacific It is Armistice Day when countries that participated in World War I remember when the guns fell silent at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month in 1918. Ngāti Porou devotee and Rarotonga resident Derek Fox […]]]>

Photo: Getty Images.

Adam gifford

Derek Fox: Armistice is marked in Aotearoa and the Pacific

It is Armistice Day when countries that participated in World War I remember when the guns fell silent at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month in 1918.

Ngāti Porou devotee and Rarotonga resident Derek Fox says it is a conflict that has affected not only many Maori families, but also those in the Pacific.

By the end of the war, 2,227 Maori and 458 Pacific Islanders had served in what became the Maori (Pioneer) Battalion.

Of these, 336 died in active service and 734 were injured. Other Maori enlisted (and died) in other units.

Mr. Fox says the transition from the South Seas to the battlefields of France and the Middle East has been difficult for the troops in the Pacific.

“Some of our people in New Zealand were relatively crude and hadn’t long left the days when there had been battles between Maori and colonial troops. Well these guys got even worse and when they went to train in Auckland they had never worn boots before so they were in pain. they were used to living on fresh fish, fresh fruit and veg, and they ended up with bullied beef and it was hard on them, it really affected them, ”he says.

Due to Covid restrictions, this morning’s Armistice Day ceremony at Pukeahu National War Memorial Park in Wellington is not open to the public.



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Falling COVID level poses a risk https://colinmarshallradio.com/falling-covid-level-poses-a-risk/ https://colinmarshallradio.com/falling-covid-level-poses-a-risk/#respond Mon, 08 Nov 2021 20:12:34 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/falling-covid-level-poses-a-risk/ Photo: Getty Images. Adam gifford Sue Crengle: falling COVID level poses risk Click for the full interview. A member of the Maori Pandemic Response Group Te Rōpū Whakakaupapa Urutā is disappointed with the decision to ease restrictions as the number of daily COVID-19 cases remains high. From midnight, Auckland will drop to 3.2 conditions, which […]]]>

Photo: Getty Images.

Adam gifford

Sue Crengle: falling COVID level poses risk

Click for the full interview.

A member of the Maori Pandemic Response Group Te Rōpū Whakakaupapa Urutā is disappointed with the decision to ease restrictions as the number of daily COVID-19 cases remains high.

From midnight, Auckland will drop to 3.2 conditions, which means that Auckland’s shops and public facilities can reopen and outdoor gatherings can reach 25 people.

The far north fell back to level 2 on Thursday evening, after being upgraded to level 3 last week because authorities were unsure of the origin of two cases near Kaitaia.

Public health expert Sue Crengle said a few more weeks without changing levels would have given providers a chance to increase Maori immunization levels.

She says especially in Northland, health authorities need to be convinced there is more community spread before they lower levels.

“If there is no other community spread, going down one level, a sure thing to do, but if there is another community spread that we haven’t identified yet, then there is has a risk that with the descent to level 2, it gives the virus a little more leeway to move among the whānau, ”explains Dr Crengle.



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WHMI 93.5 FM radio station – Livingston County Michigan News, weather, traffic, sports, school updates and the best classic hit https://colinmarshallradio.com/whmi-93-5-fm-radio-station-livingston-county-michigan-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hit-4/ https://colinmarshallradio.com/whmi-93-5-fm-radio-station-livingston-county-michigan-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hit-4/#respond Sat, 06 Nov 2021 21:20:59 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/whmi-93-5-fm-radio-station-livingston-county-michigan-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hit-4/ Kali9 / iStock (HOUSTON) – At least eight people have died, including two teenagers, after a crowd rushed to the stage at a massive concert in Houston, causing panic and chaos, authorities said. More than 50,000 people were in attendance for the first night of this weekend’s sold-out Astroworld music festival at NRG Stadium when, […]]]>
Kali9 / iStock

(HOUSTON) – At least eight people have died, including two teenagers, after a crowd rushed to the stage at a massive concert in Houston, causing panic and chaos, authorities said.

More than 50,000 people were in attendance for the first night of this weekend’s sold-out Astroworld music festival at NRG Stadium when, at around 9:30 p.m. local time, “the crowd began to compress towards the front of the scene, ”said Houston Fire Chief Sam Pena. journalists Friday evening.

“It caused some panic and started causing injuries,” Pena said.

Twenty-five people, including one barely 10 years old, were taken to hospital, authorities said. Eleven people were transported into cardiac arrest, Pena added.

As of Saturday afternoon, 13 people were still hospitalized, including five under the age of 18, Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner told reporters in a briefing.

Those who died were between 14 and 27 years old. One was 14, another 16, two were 21, two were 23 and one was 27, the mayor said. One has not yet been identified.

“Nothing of this magnitude that any of us can remember, and certainly that I can remember, took place in this city,” said Turner.

The cause of death of the eight people will not be known until the medical examiner has completed the investigation, Pena said.

Some of those who died did not have IDs on them, Houston Police Chief Troy Finner told reporters on Friday.

A missing persons information command post has been set up in a nearby hotel. As of Saturday afternoon, no one was reported missing, officials said.

The festival ended early Friday night and was canceled for Saturday.

Pena described the chaotic scene in an interview with ABC News’ Gio Benitez on “Good Morning America” ​​on Saturday.

“As soon as the crowds started pouring in… these people started to be trapped, basically in the front, and they started to be stepped on and people were falling and passing out,” Pena said.

A bystander said she was pushed “very aggressively”.

“It was intense, it was intense,” the viewer told “Good Morning America”. “We saw people pulling out of the crowd, and we saw some of these people unconscious.”

Madeline Eskins, who attended the concert with her boyfriend, told ABC News they tried to leave when they started being pushed from all sides towards the front of the stage but couldn’t move .

“I remember I was about to tell him to tell my son that I love him because at that point I was like, ‘I’m going to die,'” Eskins said. “I really didn’t think I was going to see him again. And then I passed out.”

Amid the chaotic scene and the mass of people, it was difficult to disperse the crowd and reach those in need of medical attention, Pena said. Festival organizer Live Nation had set up some sort of field hospital to treat minor injuries during the festival, but this was “quickly overwhelmed.”

Eskins, an intensive care nurse, said once recovered she began helping on-site medical staff treat unconscious bystanders and delegate tasks, though medical supplies, including defibrillators, are limited. .

“I was trying to control the chaos as much as possible,” she said. “Nothing could have prepared them for this.”

The cause of the incident is currently unknown, according to Finner, who said Live Nation is working with police to review video footage from the concert.

“Nobody has all the answers tonight,” he said on Friday. “There are a lot of rumors going around. We don’t have facts, we don’t have proof.

“We need to investigate and find out because it’s not fair to the producers, to anyone else involved, until we figure out what happened, what caused the surge. We don’t know. not. We’ll find out. “

Viewers knew something was wrong with a set from headliner Travis Scott. In the middle of his performance, the rapper stopped and told the crowd, “Someone has passed out here,” as captured by an Apple Music livestream of the event.

“I am absolutely devastated by what happened last night,” Scott, from Houston, said in a statement on Twitter on Saturday. “My prayers go out to the families and to all who have been touched by what happened at the Astroworld Festival.”

Scott said the Houston Police Department had their “full support” during the investigation and that he was “committed to working with the Houston community to heal and support families in need.”

Festival organizers also said they were “focused on supporting local officials” and urged anyone with information to contact police.

Live Nation also released a statement Friday saying it was “heartbroken for those lost and affected at Astroworld last night” and “is working to provide as much information and assistance as possible” to local authorities. .

The inquiries will speak with concert promoters and witnesses and examine videos of the event and location on Saturday, according to Turner.

“I requested a detailed briefing from all stakeholders, including Live Nation, Harris County, NRG Park, police, firefighters, the Emergency Management Office and other agencies, explaining how the event got out of hand resulting in the death and injury of several participants, ”he said in a previous statement.

Governor Greg Abbott said he ordered the Texas Department of Public Safety to make state resources available to support the investigation.

“What happened at the Astroworld festival last night was tragic, and our hearts are with those who lost their lives and those who were injured in the terrifying wave of crowds,” Abbott said in a statement. “Thank you to the first responders and the Good Samaritans who were there and immediately attended to those injured in the crowd.”

This isn’t the first time that there have been crowd control issues at Astroworld. There was a “similar incident” at the 2019 festival, where there was a “breach of barricades,” according to Harris County Judge Lina Hidalgo.

“Action was taken after this experience. There were stronger fences, more robust barricades, more staff and more security personnel,” Hidalgo told reporters on Saturday.

The number of Houston Police Department officers on site increased from 47 in 2019 to 76 at this year’s festival, she said. There was also additional space for crowd control, she said.

“But I want to know, the community deserves to know, if more needs to be done,” she said, calling for an independent investigation into the tragedy. “The public has a role to play here too. If you have any information about what happened, let us know.”

Frank Elaridi of ABC News contributed to this report.

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WHMI 93.5 FM radio station – Livingston County Michigan News, weather, traffic, sports, school updates and the best classic hit https://colinmarshallradio.com/whmi-93-5-fm-radio-station-livingston-county-michigan-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hit-3/ https://colinmarshallradio.com/whmi-93-5-fm-radio-station-livingston-county-michigan-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hit-3/#respond Fri, 05 Nov 2021 15:28:11 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/whmi-93-5-fm-radio-station-livingston-county-michigan-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hit-3/ ABC News (NEW YORK) — This report is part of “Rethinking gun violence” an ABC News series examining the level of gun violence in the United States – and what can be done about it. Gun violence is an endemic problem in the United States – once again worsening in some areas after many years […]]]>
ABC News

(NEW YORK) — This report is part of “Rethinking gun violence” an ABC News series examining the level of gun violence in the United States – and what can be done about it.

Gun violence is an endemic problem in the United States – once again worsening in some areas after many years of decline and persisting at high levels in others.

While it is one of the leading causes of death, one thing that’s hard to know is the extent of the problem, fueled in part by a more than two-decade – recently amended ban on the Centers for Disease Control. and Prevention using federal funds to “defend or promote gun control”.

This has not always been the case: in 1983 the CDC adopted a public health approach to gun violence.

“At that time, in 1983, there were two types of frequent injury deaths. One was motor vehicle crashes and the other was gun violence,” Dr. Mark Rosenberg, CEO of the Task Force for global health and former CDC member of the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, told ABC News.

During the 1990s, both public and private programs conducted research on firearms, including the CDC’s Injury Prevention Program, where Rosenberg worked, and the Violence Prevention Research Program of the University of California at Davis.

But in 1996, Congress passed an amendment to the Omnibus Consolidated Appropriation Bill. The bill’s amendment, commonly known as the Dickey Amendment, prohibited the use of federal funds to “defend or promote gun control,” resulting in the elimination of all funding from the CDC to conduct gun-related research. fire – having a lasting impact further limiting what we know today about gun violence.

Even though the funding tap was recently reactivated, researchers are still feeling the effects of the lack of data to study gun violence. Researchers say the problem of gun violence is urgent and requires a disproportionate solution, detached from politics.

To concern ABC News Live Mondays at 3 p.m. to learn more about gun violence from experts during panel discussions. And check back next week, when we take a look at what some gun owners think can solve gun violence.

“If we can understand the causes, we can change the effects and we can change the effects for the better, so science is a way to understand cause and effect and a way to link them,” Rosenberg told ABC News .

Here’s what you need to know about the gun violence data problem and what advocates say it can be done:

Impact of the Dickey Amendment

In the early 1990s, the CDC had a Budget of $ 2.6 million dedicated to gun violence research for both internal research and external studies.

“We started to find out what the problem is,” Rosenberg told ABC News. The agency studied the number of people who died as a result of gun violence, the weapons used and the underlying causes.

Dr Garen Wintemute, head of the violence prevention research program at the University of California at Davis, said the program received two grants at the time to conduct much-needed gun research.

“All of these grants used unique data collected in California,” said Wintemute, who told ABC News that the organization is linking gun purchases to criminal records as part of its prevention research.

But that all changed when the Dickey Amendment was introduced by former Rep. Jay Dickey, R-Ark.

Four years before the passage of the Dickey Amendment, the CDC published its first study on gun violence. The report looked at the correlation between safety and guns, concluding that having a gun in a household doesn’t necessarily lead to safer outcomes, Rosenberg said.

“The NRA did not like these findings. So they stepped up their attack on our research program,” Rosenberg told ABC News.

ABC News has contacted the National Rifle Association to ask for comment on Dr. Rosenberg’s allegations, but has not received a response.

The Dickey Amendment reallocated the $ 2.6 million from gun research to other health research on topics such as traumatic brain injury, according to Wintemute.

Researchers fought the effects of the amendment, which banned advocacy for gun control but had an impact beyond advocacy, as experts said they considered the vague language of the amendment as a “threat”.

“This Dickey Amendment has been a real deterrent,” Rosenberg told ABC News. “It was enough to discourage individual researchers and, at the same time, Congress took away the money we were using for the research we were doing.”

The CDC sent ABC News a statement saying it was “subject to a language of credits indicating that none of the funds made available to the CDC can be used to” defend or promote gun control. “

“The lack of dedicated and sustained funding for gun injury research (…) has limited our ability to conduct research to better understand how best to prevent gun-related injuries and deaths compared to to other public health issues, ”he said.

Shortage of funds

The Wintermute program suffered from a lack of federal funds after the amendment was passed. Although he was able to continue to do research with private funding, this work was limited. He originally had around 12 people on his team, but says he only had four left, including himself, limiting the scope of the program.

Although the Department of Justice has still allocated funds for gun research under the auspices of the National Institute of Justice (the research arm of the Department of Justice), Wintemute said it was was insufficient.

For example, in 2004, a total of $ 461,759 was awarded by the agency to three different institutes for firearms research – a far cry from the millions normally required for in-depth study.

“We had to go back to simpler, more descriptive studies that used available data. There was no money to go out and collect data in bulk,” Wintemute said.

Other institutions conducting research have also been affected.

“Due to the Dickey Amendment, we took gun injuries out of our portfolio,” said Dr. Frederick Rivara, epidemiologist and professor at the University of Washington, who conducted injury prevention research, including gun-related injuries.

“It really discouraged any serious research on guns,” Rivara said.

This gap in firearms research has resulted in a dearth of people familiar with the subject and a lack of data still felt by experts today.

“It will be another five to ten years before we have a sufficient number of experienced researchers on the case,” Wintemute said.

Search resumes

The need for research and data collection was finally reconsidered by the federal government after the mass shooting in Parkland in 2018 that left 17 people dead.

After the mass shooting, an omnibus bill was signed by President Donald Trump clarifying that restricting the use of federal funds to defend or promote gun control does not prohibit research.

In 2019, Congress resumed allocating funds for research and data collection on gun violence and injury.

While the Dickey Amendment remains in place, Dickey, its author who died in 2017, saw the impact on gun-related research and changed his mind, according to Rosenberg – who later became friends with Dickey.

“Jay Dickey has finally seen the dire consequences of gun violence… with mass shootings with increasing numbers of gun homicides and suicides,” Rosenberg told ABC News. “He changed his position.

In a editorial co-authored with Rosenberg in 2012, Dickey says he “served as the NRA’s resource person in Congress” to cut the budget for gun violence research.

“We were on the other side of the fierce battle 16 years ago, but now we fully agree that scientific research should be done on gun injury prevention and how to prevent gun deaths can be found without infringing on the rights of legitimate gun owners. , we read in a section of the article published in The Washington Post.

More funds needed

Federal funds are now available to study gun violence, but organizations working on policy recommendations are still struggling to lead it.

“There is more money for research now. But what is missing are datasets,” said Josh Horwitz, executive director of the Gun Violence Education Fund, referring to the datasets at the federal level who could help with gun research. “We destroy federal background check records in 24 hours… how do you suppose you understand who is buying guns and what the implications are, if you can’t look at that data,” he added.

The nonprofit, affiliated with the Coalition to Stop Gun Violence based in Washington DC, focuses on finding evidence-based policy solutions and programs that can reduce gun violence.

“The data deficit has hurt us because we don’t understand all the solutions,” Horwitz told ABC News.

Despite the lack of research, experts say there is still a way forward to find solutions to the high levels of gun violence plaguing the country.

“It’s a solvable problem,” Rosenberg said. “We can find out what the patterns are, what the problem is, we can find out the causes, we can find out what works both to reduce gun violence and protect gun rights.”

The key to finding possible solutions, researchers said, is to focus on science rather than politics.

“Science is not advocacy, science understands things as they are,” Wintemute said.

While the gun research landscape has improved, there is still a long way to go, Wintemute said.

For fiscal year 2022, Congress approved at least $ 25 million to fund gun violence research, according to the CDC. And while that’s an increase of $ 12.5 million from the previous year, more resources are needed, according to Wintemude.

“The Congress was unsuccessful,” he said.

He believes the gun research budget needs to match the scale of the problem and also help offset the track record of the Dickey Amendment, including the gaps in the data and expertise it created. .

“To help eliminate the story and attack the problem with a research program suited to the size of the problem itself, we must remove the Dickey Amendment, even as amended,” he added.

Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.


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Dame Cath transformed the role of Governor General https://colinmarshallradio.com/dame-cath-transformed-the-role-of-governor-general/ https://colinmarshallradio.com/dame-cath-transformed-the-role-of-governor-general/#respond Sun, 31 Oct 2021 19:07:56 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/dame-cath-transformed-the-role-of-governor-general/ Photo: History of New Zealand. As Aotearoa’s first Maori Wahine Governor General, Dame Cindy Kiro, begins her first full week on the job, the first woman in the role is seen as a trailblazer for women in public life. Dame Catherine Tizard died yesterday in Auckland at the age of 90 after a long illness. […]]]>

Photo: History of New Zealand.

As Aotearoa’s first Maori Wahine Governor General, Dame Cindy Kiro, begins her first full week on the job, the first woman in the role is seen as a trailblazer for women in public life.

Dame Catherine Tizard died yesterday in Auckland at the age of 90 after a long illness.

Her first steps in public life were with the Play Center Association while raising her four children.

She was first elected to Auckland City Council in 1971 while continuing to work as a zoology lecturer at the University of Auckland.

In 1983, Dame Catherine was the first woman to be elected mayor of Auckland, resigning in 1990 to become governor general.

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said Governor General Dame Catherine had succeeded in making the office more accessible to New Zealanders.

“In everything she has done, she has demonstrated her remarkable qualities of leadership and determination, combined with a down-to-earth approach and an unstoppable sense of humor,” said Ms. Ardern.

The Tizard family say that Dame Catherine wanted a private cremation, and since she was both a scientist and a good citizen, it will be so.

They hope to find a way to honor his memory in public in the future.



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WHMI 93.5 FM radio station – Livingston County Michigan News, weather, traffic, sports, school updates and the best classic hit https://colinmarshallradio.com/whmi-93-5-fm-radio-station-livingston-county-michigan-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hit-2/ https://colinmarshallradio.com/whmi-93-5-fm-radio-station-livingston-county-michigan-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hit-2/#respond Sun, 31 Oct 2021 16:14:40 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/whmi-93-5-fm-radio-station-livingston-county-michigan-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hit-2/ Terry Ashe / ABC (NEW YORK) – Legendary ABC News journalist and political commentator Cokie Roberts has “two legacies,” her 50-year-old husband said. “The Public Cokie and the Private Cokie,” fellow journalist Steven Roberts said in an interview with ABC News’s Martha Raddatz. “Audience Cokie was someone who was such a role model for women… […]]]>
Terry Ashe / ABC

(NEW YORK) – Legendary ABC News journalist and political commentator Cokie Roberts has “two legacies,” her 50-year-old husband said.

“The Public Cokie and the Private Cokie,” fellow journalist Steven Roberts said in an interview with ABC News’s Martha Raddatz. “Audience Cokie was someone who was such a role model for women… but that was only half of his heritage.”

“The other half … [was her belief that] anyone can be a good person. Anyone can learn something about these private acts of generosity, charity and friendship, “he continued.” She lived the gospel every day, and some might say that is the most important legacy she leaves. “

Cokie Roberts was a fixture on national television and radio for over 40 years. She has won countless awards, including three Emmy Awards, throughout her decades-long career. She was inducted into the Broadcast and Cable Hall of Fame and was named by the American Women in Radio and Television as one of the 50 Greatest Women in Broadcasting History. She has also written five best-selling books focusing on the role of women in American history.

“I’ve had so many people say to me, ‘I went into journalism because of Cokie,’” said Steven Roberts. “Countless young women saw her on TV, heard her on the radio and said, ‘I can be her, I could be that strong. I could be that smart. I don’t want to have to hide. who I am. I can be myself. I could be a strong, independent woman. ‘”

Her book, “Cokie: A Life Well Lived”, available Tuesday, is a tribute to his beloved wife after losing her to breast cancer in 2019. It documents their 53-year marriage, her public accomplishments as well that privacy, which he felt was even more inspiring.

Cokie and Steven Roberts met at a young age in college. He was 19 and at Harvard. She was 18 and was dating Wellesley.

“We were at a student policy meeting. I had known his sister. She had known my twin brother, ”he recalls. “Our dorms in Boston are only 12 and a half miles apart. “

Cokie was the daughter of political scions. His parents, Hale and Lindy Boggs, both served in Congress, representing the city of New Orleans for nearly 50 years in total.

“The Speaker of the House, Sam Rayburn, was a frequent dinner guest during his childhood in the 1950s (in the house where I still live), and the Speaker and Mrs. Johnson came to our wedding in 1966 (in the garden of this house), ”writes Steven Roberts.

He joked that he first fell in love with his future mother-in-law and “finally got to Cokie”.

She was a devout Catholic, and he was a Jew. Roberts said it took him three years to propose. He was 23 and she was 22 at the time.

“My mother often said that the first Passover Seder she attended was with her Catholic daughter-in-law… and there was a joke in the family. She was the best Jew in the family, ”he said.

After their wedding, Steven Roberts said the couple moved four times over the next 11 years for their work as New York Times correspondent, and yet, “everywhere we went, [Cokie] worked one way or another. ”She began her career as a foreign radio correspondent for CBS in the 1970s.

“When we were living in Greece… there was a coup in Cyprus. I flew to Cyprus, but then… the Greek government fell and after seven years of military rule it was the biggest story in the world that week, ”he said.[Cokie] started covering it for CBS … I come back to find out I’m married to a veteran foreign correspondent.

Cokie Robert then joined NPR as a full-time reporter, covering Capitol Hill and reporting on the Panama Canal Treaty. She was only 34 years old. In 1987, she was called for a one-time trial for ABC News’ “This Week’s” roundtable. It was the number one Sunday morning show, but it featured three white men – Sam Donaldson, George Will and David Brinkley – and ABC was under pressure to diversify the cast.

Her one-time essay became a weekly appearance and she ultimately earned her place at the table. Roberts co-hosted “This Week” on ABC with Donaldson from 1996-2002. She was also a political commentator, chief congressional analyst, and commentator on “This Week” during her three decades at ABC.

Her husband thinks that the real heart of her attraction was with other women, who thought, “wait, someone who thinks like me, someone who talks like me, someone who sees the world like me. “

“And that was really the basis of his ABC success,” said Roberts.

He explains that at that time, women felt they had to choose between a professional career and a personal life. Cokie Roberts, with two children, six grandchildren and a long marriage, still managed to have the career she did.

Steven Roberts said she will tell women this all the time as she helps them overcome pitfalls and obstacles.

“She said, ‘You can do it. You can’t have it all all the time, but you can have it most of the time, ”he said.

Cokie Roberts was also, according to her husband, “very hard on men who she said hid or abused women.”

When President George W. Bush appointed former Senator John Tower, R-Texas, as Secretary of Defense, Sam Donaldson brought up rumors of “feminization” on the show. Tower turned to Roberts and asked for a definition of the term “feminization”. She quickly retorted in one of the most memorable moments on television, “I think most women know that when they see him, Senator.”

Steven Roberts noted that the response was “phenomenal”, especially among women.

Cokie Roberts has also spoken openly about his long battle with breast cancer. She was first diagnosed in 2002, but long before that, she had become a breast cancer research activist when two of her friends, in their 50s, died of breast cancer that same week.

“When she was diagnosed on her own, she knew all about it, and it was a devastating blow,” said Steven Roberts. “But she received a lot of good treatment and she lived 14 years in remission.”

In “Cokie,” Steven Roberts wrote about his simple goal of honoring his wife.

“To tell stories, some will make you clap, laugh or cry,” he wrote. “And some, I hope, will inspire you to be more like Cokie, to be a good person, to lead a good life.”

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