Radio station – Colin Marshall Radio http://colinmarshallradio.com/ Wed, 18 May 2022 04:39:48 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://colinmarshallradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-1-1-120x120.png Radio station – Colin Marshall Radio http://colinmarshallradio.com/ 32 32 Legal aid that cannot be fixed with money https://colinmarshallradio.com/legal-aid-that-cannot-be-fixed-with-money/ Wed, 18 May 2022 04:39:48 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/legal-aid-that-cannot-be-fixed-with-money/ Photo: Radio Waatea Image Database. Adam Gifford Sue Moroney: Legal aid can’t be fixed with money We are asking for a complete overhaul of the legal aid system. Sue Moroney, chief executive of Aotearoa Community Law Centres, says that although there is an immediate need for more money to process more cases and the impact […]]]>

Photo: Radio Waatea Image Database.

Adam Gifford

Sue Moroney: Legal aid can’t be fixed with money

We are asking for a complete overhaul of the legal aid system.

Sue Moroney, chief executive of Aotearoa Community Law Centres, says that although there is an immediate need for more money to process more cases and the impact of Covid-19 on the courts, the system global is down.

She told Waatea radio host Matthey Tukaki that the situation is particularly dire in the areas of family court and juvenile justice, where people cannot find a lawyer to represent them because the rates of wages have dropped so much that they can get private work.

“People who can afford to pay $300 or $400 an hour for a lawyer frankly don’t have the most complex situations and the most complex lives. These are low-income people whose situations are very complex. Private law firms find it difficult to accept these clients because the cases are complex they cost that firm I guess an opportunity cost for other work they might undertake that would be more lucrative for them . So we just don’t think this model is sustainable,” Ms Moroney says.

She says it is time to assess how well the public defense service being tested in South Auckland is working and whether it should be rolled out across the country.


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A shared approach stimulates the SUDI hapūtanga class https://colinmarshallradio.com/a-shared-approach-stimulates-the-sudi-haputanga-class/ Mon, 16 May 2022 00:10:17 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/a-shared-approach-stimulates-the-sudi-haputanga-class/ Photo: Radio Waatea Image Database. Adam Gifford Selection of Fay Selby-Law | Director General of the SUDI National Prevention Coordination Service of Hapai te Hauoras Maori public health educators are working together to try to change the dial on sudden and unexpected deaths in early childhood. Fay Selby-Law, head of Hāpai Te Hauora’s SUDI National […]]]>

Photo: Radio Waatea Image Database.

Adam Gifford

Selection of Fay Selby-Law | Director General of the SUDI National Prevention Coordination Service of Hapai te Hauoras

Maori public health educators are working together to try to change the dial on sudden and unexpected deaths in early childhood.

Fay Selby-Law, head of Hāpai Te Hauora’s SUDI National Prevention Coordination Service, says infant deaths have plateaued, with Whānau Māori still being disproportionately affected.

She says wānanga took place in Mataatua waka, with input from Patrick Salmon with his smoking cessation method Heru and Hapū Mama, prenatal educator Kelly Anne Spriggs and Whanganui weaver Jenny Firman, an expert in making wahakura pēpi pods.

Local services brought together māmā in need.

“Really, the things we were focusing on was that they were hapū, they smoked, they wouldn’t normally attend a prenatal education class, a hapūtanga class, and they were ready to weave a wahakura during this period,” says Ms Selby-Law. .

Hāapai Te Hauora applied for funding to run the program in Whanganui and Auckland where the highest number of SUDI cases occur.


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Texas’ oldest radio station is getting closer to a whole new direction https://colinmarshallradio.com/texas-oldest-radio-station-is-getting-closer-to-a-whole-new-direction/ Fri, 13 May 2022 16:04:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/texas-oldest-radio-station-is-getting-closer-to-a-whole-new-direction/ There are the old radio stations, and then there is the Dallas WRR. As the first licensed radio station in the state, it began broadcasting police and fire transmissions. Finally in 1964, they definitely switched to a classical music format. KERA President and CEO Nico Leone said his age was not his only point of […]]]>

There are the old radio stations, and then there is the Dallas WRR. As the first licensed radio station in the state, it began broadcasting police and fire transmissions. Finally in 1964, they definitely switched to a classical music format.

KERA President and CEO Nico Leone said his age was not his only point of differentiation.

“WRR is a century-old classic station owned and operated by the City of Dallas,” he said. “For decades it was just a mainstay of the arts community, a free service available to everyone, offering classical music and covering the arts.”

Last year, Dallas officials decided they no longer wanted to run the station and issued a request for proposals from interested parties who might want to take the reins. KERA made their bid, and with their selection as the preferred organization, they are much closer to winning that bid. Leone said their goal was simple.

“We are a public broadcaster. We have been one for over 60 years. We operate an NPR station, a PBS station, a triple-A music station,” Leone said. “And the one format that we don’t have in our family that really thrives in public broadcasting is classical music.”

Nico Leone, CEO of KERA

And in fact, NPR stations across the country operate classic sister stations. It is much more difficult in the commercial field.

“One of the challenges the city has identified is the sustainability of the station as a conventional station in the commercial space. There just aren’t many classic commercial stations left,” he said.

Some fans may fear that the format will change. Leone said no.

“Our explicit intention and the requirements of the RFP (request for proposal) is that WRR will remain a classic station,” Leone said.

All this assumes that KERA will win the contract, but it is not yet certain.

“It goes to the arts and culture quality of life committee for a hearing on Monday May 16, then it is tentatively scheduled for a vote with the full council on (in) June,” he said. declared.

If KERA wins the vote, Leone said WRR would not leave its historic location on the grounds of the State Fair of Texas. He hints that KERA might partner for projects with classical music entities like the Dallas Symphony Orchestra and the Fort Worth Symphony.

“I think this is one of the most exciting opportunities for us. And KERA has such a long history of working in the arts, bringing artistic content to the public,” Leone said. “We think it’s just another way to do this and a way for us to expand our work in this area and in the community.”

The first chore after the vote would be the plan to convert the WRR from commercial to non-commercial. And then grow it.

“We have an eye on the sustainability of the station by converting it to a non-commercial station. We haven’t gone into all the details of how we would do that because we’re just not at that stage of the process. But growth is our explicit goal,” he said.

If the City of Dallas awards management to KERA, it is only a management contract. WRR will continue to be owned by Dallas.

    A WRR station wagon in the mid 1950s.

A WRR station wagon in the mid 1950s.

Editor’s Note: Texas Public Radio and KERA are both part of The Texas Newsroom, a public radio journalism collaboration. KERA reporters were not involved in reporting or editing this story.

Copyright 2022 Texas Public Radio. To learn more, visit Texas Public Radio.

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ACT’s budget stuck in a mythical past https://colinmarshallradio.com/acts-budget-stuck-in-a-mythical-past/ Thu, 12 May 2022 08:43:25 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/acts-budget-stuck-in-a-mythical-past/ Photo: Getty Images. Pierre Veschaffelt Brent Reihana: ACT Budget stuck in a mythical past A Maori economist says ACT’s budget response shows the party lives in a world of unicorns and pixie dust. Leader David Seymour said the party wanted to sell off more state assets and also wanted to get rid of government agencies […]]]>

Photo: Getty Images.

Pierre Veschaffelt

Brent Reihana: ACT Budget stuck in a mythical past

A Maori economist says ACT’s budget response shows the party lives in a world of unicorns and pixie dust.

Leader David Seymour said the party wanted to sell off more state assets and also wanted to get rid of government agencies such as the Maori, Ethnic Women and Pacific ministries.

Brent Reihana says it dates back to the formation of ACT in the days of Rogernomics, and current Finance Minister Grant Robinson has a better idea of ​​what is needed to recover the economy from the Covid pandemic.

“Training Maori trades is one of the ideas (the government) came back. Mana and Mahi, they’re investing $230 million to get people back into trades training and all that sort of thing, it’s a great idea. Selling assets is not a good idea,” he says.


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Maintaining the Covid setting for the BA5 variant https://colinmarshallradio.com/maintaining-the-covid-setting-for-the-ba5-variant/ Wed, 11 May 2022 05:39:31 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/maintaining-the-covid-setting-for-the-ba5-variant/ Photo: Getty Images. Adam Gifford John Whaanga: maintaining Covid setting for BA5 variant The Ministry of Health is closely monitoring a new variant of Covid. Omicron BA 5 has been detected at the border in travelers from South Africa. John Whaanga, the Maori deputy chief executive, says it may take several months to assess the […]]]>

Photo: Getty Images.

Adam Gifford

John Whaanga: maintaining Covid setting for BA5 variant

The Ministry of Health is closely monitoring a new variant of Covid.

Omicron BA 5 has been detected at the border in travelers from South Africa.

John Whaanga, the Maori deputy chief executive, says it may take several months to assess the severity of the variant, but the department is comfortable with current public health parameters.

He says the ministry is taking into account the lessons it has learned so far from the Covid vaccination campaign on empowering whānau and communities.

“We need to work with our community suppliers, including our Maori and pasifika suppliers. We have had success in the past not only with Covid but also with flu, so it is important to make it as easy as possible to access services like whānau,” says Mr Whaanga.

If BA5 follows the trend of other variants, it may be much more efficient at spreading, but will not have as severe an impact on health-related morbidity and mortality as previous variants.


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Ely’s beloved radio station WELY is to close https://colinmarshallradio.com/elys-beloved-radio-station-wely-is-to-close/ Fri, 06 May 2022 16:11:35 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/elys-beloved-radio-station-wely-is-to-close/ DULUTH – The Ely radio station, known for live coverage of high school Nordic ski meets, acts as a weather lifeline for area paddlers and was once owned by Charles Kuralt, is set to cease broadcasting on 1 June. WELY, owned by the Bois Forte Band of Chippewa, has been a loss-making business, the band […]]]>

DULUTH – The Ely radio station, known for live coverage of high school Nordic ski meets, acts as a weather lifeline for area paddlers and was once owned by Charles Kuralt, is set to cease broadcasting on 1 June.

WELY, owned by the Bois Forte Band of Chippewa, has been a loss-making business, the band said in a statement.

“We worked behind the scenes to find a buyer who could continue to operate the station, but our latest plans fell through,” Tribal Chairperson Cathy Chavers said in the statement. “It’s not something we wanted to do.”

But all hope is not lost: the mayor of Ely, Roger Skraba, attempts a last-minute rescue combining public and private interests.

“Some say ‘hey, that’s the end of the line,’ but I’m not ready to give it up yet,” he said.

WELY, known as “End of the Road Radio“, began broadcasting in 1954. Financial problems forced a closure in 1987, until CBS reporter Kuralt, known for his program “On the Road”, bought the station in 1995. He operated it. until his death in 1997. Bois Forte acquired WELY in 2005.

The station employs a full-time general manager, Brett Ross, and eight part-time workers.

Its reach spans across upper Arrowhead and is the local source for Minnesota Twins baseball, regional news, emergency messages and area high school sports. Saturdays are known for polka and requests, and the Trader Craig show is a favorite among residents. The station even shares what’s for lunch at Ely Schools.

“It’s kind of the hub of the community,” Ross said, and losing that connection would be “devastating.”

A sign on the west side of Ely warns visitors entering the Boundary Waters Canoe Area wilderness that emergency weather information can be found at 94.5 FM.

“People are bringing crank radios into boundary waters. They plan their trips with advice from WELY,” Ross said.

Despite a national decline in radio station revenues, “radio still thrives in small, rural communities” like Ely, he said.

But a sales position was cut during the pandemic and expensive upgrades are needed. Ross said he used “tech tape” to keep the station on the air. Bois Forte lost $1.7 million in that venture, he said, including the purchase amount.

It’s a tough market to keep a radio station going, Skraba said, but it’s worth “rallying” the city to keep a station that’s so often seen as providing a community service. Ely students play sports in towns sometimes two or three hours away, and parents plan to hear a football game on the radio if they can’t make the drive on a given night.

“How can you put a price on that?” Skraba asked.

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End of the road for Ely radio? https://colinmarshallradio.com/end-of-the-road-for-ely-radio/ Wed, 04 May 2022 23:29:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/end-of-the-road-for-ely-radio/ David Colburn ELY- “End of the Road Radio” has seemingly reached the literal end of the road, tipping into a financial abyss with no emergency relief.WELY FM 94.5 and AM 1450, Ely’s local broadcast icon with the clever tagline that has been operated by the Bois Forte Band of Chippewa since 2005, will close permanently […]]]>

David Colburn

ELY- “End of the Road Radio” has seemingly reached the literal end of the road, tipping into a financial abyss with no emergency relief.
WELY FM 94.5 and AM 1450, Ely’s local broadcast icon with the clever tagline that has been operated by the Bois Forte Band of Chippewa since 2005, will close permanently on June 1 after 17 years of mounting financial losses
“During this time, the staff worked extremely hard to make the station profitable, but despite these efforts, the company lost over $1.7 million. This includes the purchase price when Bois Forte took possession of station in 2005,” Bois Forte public relations director Brian K. Anderson said in a press release Wednesday.
The news began to spread on Sunday after a WELY radio personality announced the impending closure in a social media post about the upcoming end of his show.
Christopher David Hanson, who hosted “Color of my Radio Minnesota Music Hour” on WELY for more than six years, said he was “completely crushed” that the program was coming to an end because “the station is scheduled to shut down June 1. “. .”
“I am sad for the people of Ely and the surrounding communities,” Hanson wrote. “I’m sad for all the bands and listeners online.”
Bois Forte Tribal Council District 1 Representative Shane Drift also responded to a request posted on his official Facebook group page on Sunday confirming that the shutdown was underway. Since his election to the board in 2018, Drift has been a strong advocate for reviewing and improving tribal business practices, including assessing WELY’s financial losses. Drift noted on his page in February that he raised concerns about the station at a meeting of the Bois Forte Development Corporation, indicating that if the tribe cannot sell the station, they should consider to close it.
“I lobbied for the tribe to do better business. It’s a tough call, but it’s a step in the right direction,” Drift said when contacted by the Timberjay on Tuesday. Drift noted that he was speaking on his own behalf and not specifically on behalf of the band or tribal council.
The Timberjay also contacted Bois Forte Tribe President Cathy Chavers and other band officials on Tuesday, but did not receive an official response until minutes before press time on Wednesday.
First opened as an AM band station in 1954 and adding an FM simulcast in 1992, the station has had a long list of owners over the years, and this isn’t the first time WELY has had to difficult to generate income.
The station closed for a month in 1984 due to a lack of funds, but the community responded with a $9,000 fundraising effort to help get the station back on the air.
It took legendary CBS News “On the Road” reporter Charles Kuralt to save the station again when it went bankrupt in 1995. Kuralt, who fell in love with Ely while making a big fuss there at over the years, bought the station at a court-supervised auction and invested thousands of dollars in upgrades. However, Kuralt’s dreams were sadly cut short when he passed away in 1997.
Bois Forte purchased the station in 2005 when Boundary Waters Broadcasters, Inc. put it up for sale.
However, the group’s purchase coincided with a 15-year decline in radio advertising revenue of more than 40% nationally, according to the National Association of Broadcasters.
“We have been working behind the scenes to find a buyer who could continue to operate the station, but our latest plans recently fell through,” Chavers said in the press release. “While we would have preferred to keep the station open in the hope that another buyer would emerge, we had to move forward with this decision.”
WELY staff, which includes one full-time employee and eight part-time employees, were notified of the decision to close late last week.
“We worked behind the scenes to find a buyer who could continue to operate the station, but our latest plans recently fell through,” Chavers said.
“While we would have preferred to keep the station open in the hope that another buyer would emerge, we had to move forward with this decision.”
reactions
“My first reaction was grief and sadness,” said WELY general manager Brett Ross.
“This station has so much history and means so much to the city. The thing is, the people of Ely owned this station and there will be a big void once we get off the air.
As the manager of local public access station Ely Area Television and a former employee of WELY for two years, Todd Crego said the loss of the station would leave a hole in the city’s social and entertainment landscape.
“It’s incredibly sad – it feels like the end of an era in a way,” Crego said. “(WELY’s) Saturday Morning Polka is such an Ely thing.”
Crego said changing technology was a likely influence in the station’s demise.
“It’s so much easier to get just about anything you want when you want it, first with Napster (one of the first digital music file sharing networks), then in iTunes and now services like Spotify , where everything is just available at the click of a button,” he said. “But I still feel like there’s a big niche for a local radio audience. There are just things that are so quintessentially Ely, like doing the kids’ Santa Claus letters every Christmas and the polka show, all those things that are so community-oriented. These are the things I think of when I think of WELY.

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Meet the man behind Yakutat’s local radio station, KYKT https://colinmarshallradio.com/meet-the-man-behind-yakutats-local-radio-station-kykt/ Tue, 03 May 2022 01:47:35 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/meet-the-man-behind-yakutats-local-radio-station-kykt/ If you turn on your radio in Yakutat, Alaska, there’s a 50% chance you’re listening to KYKT. The local radio station plays an eclectic mix of music, perfect for navigating the winding roads of the coastal village. But unlike most community stations, KYKT doesn’t have many staff and volunteers spinning records. It is run by […]]]>

If you turn on your radio in Yakutat, Alaska, there’s a 50% chance you’re listening to KYKT. The local radio station plays an eclectic mix of music, perfect for navigating the winding roads of the coastal village. But unlike most community stations, KYKT doesn’t have many staff and volunteers spinning records. It is run by one man: Lee Benson.

The exterior of KYKT in Yakutat, Alaska (Tash Kimmell/KCAW)

I meet Benson at the police station – a single room at the back of the magistrate’s office. I follow the sound of music down a narrow hallway to find Benson at an aging desktop computer – the room is sparsely decorated except for a painting of a moose and an elaborate doodle about how the station works radio. It doesn’t sound like much, but this local station has been invaluable to the community.

The original radio engineer left this doodle for Benson to remember the components of the station. Benson says he still uses it today (Tash Kimmell/KCAW)

“It’s a great tool for getting messages across,” Benson says. “Not everyone has this Facebook and these social networks. So it reaches an audience that is not really computer users.

Benson says that during the coronavirus pandemic, the radio station became even more necessary — town assembly meetings were happening without an audience, and he was broadcasting them for the community.

“Even the local basketball games that we will broadcast, because there are people who cannot go out. It’s a resource they have,” he says.

When Benson came to Yakutat 15 years ago, he knew nothing about radio. He had come to work for the Forest Service, the same job he has today. It was during a trip to Hoonah that the idea of ​​a local radio crossed his mind.

“I actually credited it to a guy named Rich Jennings. He worked for the Forest Service in Hoonah. And he was kind of a music-loving radiophile,” he says.

Jennings had set up a station in tandem with Hoonah’s school, incorporating it into the curriculum. Benson liked the idea and brought it back to the Yakutat Healthy Community Coalition, a 12-member panel representing most of the community organizations that funded it through the federal grant program. The license was obtained through the Yakutat Tlingit tribe, who hired a radio engineer to install the equipment. The process took a few years, but in the fall of 2014, KYKT went live.

“I never really intended to be part of operations,” Benson says. “I thought that was a great idea.”

But when it came time for the radio engineer to leave, he had to show someone how to operate the station. The program director was out of town, so Benson stepped in temporarily. Today, some 8 years later, he is KYKT’s only manager, DJ and engineer.

Lee Benson inside the KYKT studio (Tash Kimmell/KCAW)

“I said, ‘Okay…show me and I’ll show it to the program manager.’ And that’s how it started,” he recalls.

Although Benson never expected to be so involved with the station, he always had high hopes for what she could bring to Yakutat.

“Originally, we planned to work with the school,” he says. “But unfortunately there has been a change in management at the school. They decided they couldn’t afford to be involved.

KYKT’s walls are sparsely decorated except for a moose painting (Tash Kimmell/KYKT)

While the station has the capacity for a wide range of production, the majority of its production is automated or pre-recorded. Benson says KYKT has the potential to do so much more.

“We can do anything a regular radio station does,” he says

“I can’t really speak for the community, but I myself hope that at some point we will get other people involved and the school will be involved. So that would be my hope and to keep making it work,” he says. “I was really amazed at how many people will see me in the store and be like, ‘Hey, I really like the station!’ So people are listening.

Yet after eight years of being the man behind the mic, he’s ready for someone else to take the reins.

While KYKT may not look particularly high-tech, Benson says the station has the ability to do anything and everything (Tash Kimmell/KCAW)

“It was really interesting and I enjoyed it, but it wasn’t really something I intended to do and, and I’m looking forward to… getting other people involved.”

For now, KYKT will continue to broadcast music and occasional sports updates, but in the future, Benson hopes Yakutat can elevate this one-room radio station to its full potential.

Editor’s note: Raven Radio has partnered with KYKT on various projects, including the “Community Counts Initiative” for which KCAW received a grant.

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Akron-based radio station helps highlight Youngstown area bands https://colinmarshallradio.com/akron-based-radio-station-helps-highlight-youngstown-area-bands/ Sat, 30 Apr 2022 02:19:37 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/akron-based-radio-station-helps-highlight-youngstown-area-bands/ (WKBN) – Talk to a successful young musician from Youngstown and he’ll tell you that Summit radio station has helped them a lot. It’s a station dedicated to playing local musicians and bands, and even though the station is based in Akron, it’s dedicated to Youngstown. Summit Radio Studios is attached to Akron Ellet High […]]]>

(WKBN) – Talk to a successful young musician from Youngstown and he’ll tell you that Summit radio station has helped them a lot. It’s a station dedicated to playing local musicians and bands, and even though the station is based in Akron, it’s dedicated to Youngstown.

Summit Radio Studios is attached to Akron Ellet High School.

“Maybe sometimes Youngstown has a better community than Akron and sometimes vice versa. But each city has its own identity but great local musicians, bands and artists who hail from both areas,” said Music Director Chad Miller.

“It’s not the biggest audience, but it’s a loyal following,” said general manager Tommy Bruno.

Bruno spoke to us in front of a large mural where the Youngstown area was represented by The Human Beinz, Dave Grohl and Trent Reznor. In the same studio was a stage for live concerts.

“You become a member of the radio station, you get invites to these live performances,” Bruno said.

While The Summit began in Akron, the Youngstown market was added 11 years ago when The Summit entered into an agreement to operate WKTL 90.7 FM, whose transmitter remains at Struthers High School.

“WKTL was operating as a student station and what we’re seeing across the country is a lot of these school-owned stations, the students are losing interest,” Bruno said.

With Youngstown being part of The Summit, the radio station is committed to highlighting Youngstown-based bands. In March, The Summit sponsored 330 Day with 10 local bands at Stambaugh Auditorium. Last weekend he also sponsored Federal Frenzy in downtown Youngstown.

“You know, we ask, why are you supporting the station? You can get music anywhere. It’s largely because we support local artists,” Bruno said.

The Summit’s format is an alternative adult album radio that also features music from Northeast Ohio bands, which hopefully leads to live performances for those bands.

“Frankly, the live music scene is really the only way for these artists to make money,” Bruno said.

Le Sommet is a public radio station. Forty-five percent of its revenue comes from individuals through spring and fall fundraising campaigns, 40 percent comes from corporate subscriptions, and the remaining 15 percent comes from grants and foundations.

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Council leader plans probe into radio station contacts https://colinmarshallradio.com/council-leader-plans-probe-into-radio-station-contacts/ Sat, 30 Apr 2022 00:00:17 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/council-leader-plans-probe-into-radio-station-contacts/ Wexford County Council cathaoirleach Barbara-Anne Murphy is considering a disciplinary inquiry into council secretary David Minogue stemming from his contacts with South East Radio. However, station general manager Eamonn Buttle said an independent inquiry into attempted editorial interference by the council over the past three years was needed to maintain public confidence in the local […]]]>

Wexford County Council cathaoirleach Barbara-Anne Murphy is considering a disciplinary inquiry into council secretary David Minogue stemming from his contacts with South East Radio.

However, station general manager Eamonn Buttle said an independent inquiry into attempted editorial interference by the council over the past three years was needed to maintain public confidence in the local authority.

He called on Mr Minogue to correct the record regarding statements he made earlier this month to the press, the Broadcasting Authority of Ireland (BAI), Ms Murphy, elected council members and his general manager Tom Enright.

Mr Buttle accused the county clerk of defaming him by saying he, Mr Buttle, had leaked email correspondence between the two men to the press and said he was reserving his position.

Earlier this month The Irish Times revealed the contents of email correspondence between the pair in which Mr Minogue sought to establish three ‘criteria’ for the station’s coverage of the council in the context of council advertising with the station.

The Taoiseach, Micheál Martin, later commented on the dispute, saying a council should not use its advertising budget to try to influence the editorial content of a local radio station.

Mr Minogue attached the words ‘legally privileged’ to a recent email to the station manager, but Mr Buttle said in response that he did not see how any legal privilege could be attached to the correspondence.

Mr Minogue said he now accepts that Mr Buttle did not leak the email correspondence between them to the media. Mr. Buttle, in response, said; “I await your apologies in this regard.”

New emails

The call for an apology is contained in new emails between the two men, and between Ms Murphy and Mr Buttle, which have been seen by The Irish Times.

In January, the Public Service Standards Commission (Sipo) criticized Mr Enright in a report for raising the issue of advertising spending during a dispute over the station’s 2019 council coverage.

At a subsequent council meeting on January 14 to consider the Sipo report, elected members gave Mr Enright a standing ovation.

In the latest twist in the ongoing controversy, Mr Minogue, in email correspondence with Mr Buttle, again raised the possibility of the three criteria being agreed upon in a ‘service level agreement’. with the station.

“I insist that these are not conditions for continuing to advertise with [the station] or efforts to undermine the independence of the media, a position the council fully respects, and they should not be construed as such,” he said.

In response, Mr Buttle said it was ‘unconscionable that you continue to find it appropriate to seek the imposition of such editorial ‘criteria’.

He said that “in facilitating and engaging in free and open discussion and debate regarding the business of Wexford County Council, South East Radio is not and cannot be a ‘service provider’ to Wexford Council’.

“Neither South East Radio nor I can engage in secret discussions aimed at undermining freedom of the press. Even from this distance, it seems that you have not grasped this fundamental problem.

On April 1, Mr. Buttle responded strongly to Mr. Minogue’s suggestion that the board accept the criteria, which included that presenters would not express personal opinions. He said he found the proposal “staggering” given the Sipo’s January report.

In an April 13 response, Mr Minogue said he interpreted what the station executive said to imply that he, the country secretary, had acted in breach of local government law.

duty bound

“In such circumstances, I have a legal duty as Ethics Registrar to report such a possible breach to Wexford County Council’s cathaoirleach, which I have done. I also felt compelled to report such a possible infraction to the General Manager.

The following day cathaoirleach Ms Murphy emailed Mr Buttle and informed him that she was in the process of exercising her legal duty to consider what action to take under Section 174 (8)(a) of the Local Government Act 2001, following the April 1 email criticizing Mr Minogue forwarded to him.

She noted that the law mentions investigative or disciplinary proceedings, referral of the matter to the Director of Public Prosecutions or another course of action that might be considered appropriate, among the possible options.

“If I need any further details or clarifications from you, I will contact you,” she said.

Mr Buttle, in an April 20 response, said that since March 2019 the station had been continuously subjected to “inappropriate influence, threats (legal, financial and other) and editorial interference by the County Council of Wexford”.

He said it was “unconscionable” for Mr Minogue to continue pushing for agreement on his three suggested criteria.

“Therefore, to maintain public confidence in Wexford County Council, I respectfully request that you conduct an independent inquiry into this matter, which will review all internal and external communications issued by Mr David Minogue, Mr Tom Enright and [former cathaoirleach] Councilor Michael Sheehan to and about South East Radio from March 2019 to date (including the factual accuracy of Mr. Enright’s submission to elected members of Council on January 14, 2022).

“To do otherwise would, in my view, be an injustice given the seriousness of the situation and the level of public interest in this matter.”

Mr Buttle noted that in November the BAI had ‘dismissed a wide-ranging complaint from Wexford County Council which coincidentally incorporated the three ‘criteria’ set out in Mr Minogue’s email of March 25, 2022′ .

Mr Minogue said he was acting on his own behalf when he suggested the criteria in his email in March. However, Mr Buttle said he struggled to come to terms with this.

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