Radio station – Colin Marshall Radio http://colinmarshallradio.com/ Fri, 30 Sep 2022 01:41:23 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://colinmarshallradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-1-1-120x120.png Radio station – Colin Marshall Radio http://colinmarshallradio.com/ 32 32 Raw plays tryout for Kōanga Festival https://colinmarshallradio.com/raw-plays-tryout-for-koanga-festival/ Thu, 29 Sep 2022 01:52:21 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/raw-plays-tryout-for-koanga-festival/ Moeawa Fransen Rawinia Parata | Dramatic author of the Koanga festival of the Te Pou theater Funding of roles: Two new Maori plays will have their first public readings at Auckland’s Basement Theater from tomorrow as part of Te Pou Theatre’s annual Kōanga Festival. Two new Maori plays will have their first public readings at […]]]>

Moeawa Fransen

Rawinia Parata | Dramatic author of the Koanga festival of the Te Pou theater

Funding of roles:

Two new Maori plays will have their first public readings at Auckland’s Basement Theater from tomorrow as part of Te Pou Theatre’s annual Kōanga Festival.

Two new Maori plays will have their first public readings at Auckland’s Basement Theater from tomorrow as part of Te Pou Theatre’s annual Kōanga Festival.

Maraea Rakuraku’s Te Kooti Ariki Rangi Te Tūruki is a series of monologues recounting selected aspects of Te Kooti’s life story, while Rawinia Parata’s Pōraru addresses a woman’s descent into madness and how she and his whanau face the new reality.

Parata says the Kōanga Festival Playwrights Program gave her the chance to study the play with mentor Gary Henderson and refine it for live performance.

She says it’s a challenging piece that draws on experiences within her own whanau.

“It’s about very difficult, challenging, and confronting kaupapa, but the feedback so far is that it’s nice to bring those stories to the forefront so we can process them and see them head-on,” Parata says.

When she’s not thinking about the play, Rawinia Parata is campaigning for a Tairawhiti Maori ward seat on Gisborne District Council.

Pōraru will be at the Basement Theater from September 30 to October 7.


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Covid reports move to weekly cycle https://colinmarshallradio.com/covid-reports-move-to-weekly-cycle/ Wed, 28 Sep 2022 02:39:18 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/covid-reports-move-to-weekly-cycle/ Pierre Verschaffelt John Whaanga | Covid reports move to weekly cycle Funding of roles: The Ministry of Health is moving to seven-day reporting on Covid-19. The Ministry of Health is moving to seven-day reporting on Covid-19. Its Maori deputy chief executive, John Whaanga, says he will include averages on the number of cases, hospitalizations and […]]]>

Pierre Verschaffelt

John Whaanga | Covid reports move to weekly cycle

Funding of roles:

The Ministry of Health is moving to seven-day reporting on Covid-19.

The Ministry of Health is moving to seven-day reporting on Covid-19.

Its Maori deputy chief executive, John Whaanga, says he will include averages on the number of cases, hospitalizations and deaths.

This is an opportunity to include more information on Maori and Pacific cases.

“It’s really important that we collect good baseline information on the impact of Covid and it’s particularly important that we collect information on ethnicity,” Mr Whaanga says.

The department has also commissioned research at Victoria University into long Covid, and it is giving clinicians and the public more guidance on how to recognize and manage it.

Over the past week, 9809 new cases have been reported, including 1052 reinfections.

There were eight deaths attributed to Covid during the week and 166 cases in hospital as of midnight Monday.

There are a total of 9786 active cases including 1118 Maori.


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KGY and the port of Olympia again at odds over the construction of a radio station https://colinmarshallradio.com/kgy-and-the-port-of-olympia-again-at-odds-over-the-construction-of-a-radio-station/ Sun, 25 Sep 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/kgy-and-the-port-of-olympia-again-at-odds-over-the-construction-of-a-radio-station/ The KGY building, perched on the peninsula of the port of Olympia since 1960, has been nominated for a local historic register. The port opposes the nomination. Olympia Heritage Commission Courtesy KGY radio and the port of Olympia are again at odds over the building the station has occupied since 1960 at the far north […]]]>

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The KGY building, perched on the peninsula of the port of Olympia since 1960, has been nominated for a local historic register. The port opposes the nomination.

Courtesy

KGY radio and the port of Olympia are again at odds over the building the station has occupied since 1960 at the far north of the port peninsula.

Earlier this year, KGY considered a possible sale of the building to a Tumwater company called Glacier Aviation who wanted to turn it into a possible bar and restaurant, including round-trip helicopter flights.

That idea did not move forward, said KGY radio general manager Nick Kerry. There was a “general reluctance to continue the conversation from a port perspective,” Kerry told The Olympian in April.

Today, the property, considered to be of historical importance, has been nominated for inclusion in the Heritage Register of Olympia. The idea has the support of Kerry and members of the city’s heritage commission, but the port opposes it.

“At this time the Port of Olympia cannot support and does not consent to the nomination of the KGY Radio Building for local heritage registration,” said Allyn Roe, Port Business and Property Development Manager. , in an email to the committee on Sept. 16.

“We believe it would be appropriate to discuss the appointment process after the lease expires and in future planning efforts,” Roe added.

The lease between KGY and the port expires at the end of 2024.

Roe writes that the ordinance that governs the historic properties “would be viewed as a charge on the property that KGY has no right to approve and would place them in conflict with the terms of their lease.”

The Olympian could not reach a port official on Friday to further explain the opposition.

Details of the appointment and Roe’s email emerged during a Sept. 21 meeting of the Olympia Heritage Commission at City Hall. A port representative did not attend the meeting.

The KGY building was named by Greg Griffith, director of the Olympia Historical Society/Bigelow House Museum, with the support of the managing director of KGY Kerry, according to meeting agenda documents. A Heritage Commission subcommittee visited the building in July and toured it.

“The port of Olympia was invited but did not participate,” read the agenda documents.

The committee members returned from the visit with the feeling that the building meets the conditions for inclusion in the heritage register. Among the criteria it met: (The building) “embodies the distinctive architectural characteristics of a type, period, style or method of design or construction, or represents a significant and distinct entity whose components may lack individual distinction.

Heritage Commission chair Holly Davies was enthusiastic about the appointment.

“I can’t say enough good things about the building,” she said. “It’s a fabulous building and is still used for its original purpose, inside and out. All the parts are there. »

The September 21 meeting was originally supposed to be a public hearing and a vote on whether or not to approve the nomination to the registry, but after the port email, the meeting only resulted in a discussion on the nomination. A date for a hearing and a vote remains to be determined, said historic preservation officer Marygrace Goddu.

Kerry spoke at the meeting and expressed disappointment with the 11 a.m. email from the port, “despite our best efforts to provide significant lead time and discuss the idea and process with our landlord.”

He disagrees with the port’s idea of ​​addressing the appointment after the lease expires, saying he fears that if the lease isn’t renewed with the radio station, it puts the building at risk at risk of being demolished. At the same time, Kerry said he saw the building included in the port’s “waterfront destination” plans.

“I’m a little puzzled as to why they don’t have a positive feeling at this point in this process, but I think we should have a discussion with them and get them to reconsider,” Kerry said.

Historic Preservation Officer Goddu said the local register had more “teeth” than the state and national registers. It largely regulates the exterior of buildings, ensuring they remain intact without major alterations, although the local registry allows paint color changes and solar panels, she said.

If the heritage commission votes to approve the nomination, but the port still opposes it, then it would go to the Olympia city council, Goddu said. If the building was eventually listed on the register and there was a desire to demolish it, this demolition permit would still need to be approved, and the Heritage Commission would make a recommendation on whether to approve it to a building official. from the city.

If the city denies the demolition permit, it could be appealed to the city’s Hearing Examiner, Goddu said.

But before that happens, the commission and the port need to talk, she said.

After the building was visited in July, the subcommittee made a recommendation to the commission and a letter was sent to the port’s executive director, but the commission heard nothing until September 16.

“All of a sudden it hit their radar,” Goddu said, adding that they had yet to have an in-person meeting with the port.

“The first step is to talk to them,” she said.

Rolf has worked for The Olympian since August 2005. He covers breaking news, the town of Lacey and business for the newspaper. Rolf graduated from Evergreen State College in 1990.

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Princeton Review Names ASU’s Blaze Radio Number One College Radio Station in the United States https://colinmarshallradio.com/princeton-review-names-asus-blaze-radio-number-one-college-radio-station-in-the-united-states/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 17:20:32 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/princeton-review-names-asus-blaze-radio-number-one-college-radio-station-in-the-united-states/ The Princeton Review ranked Blaze Radio as the top college radio station in the nation. “In my mind, it makes sense that we are finally the best because our members for sure deserve it,” said Blaze radio station manager Autriya Maneshni. In 2020, Blaze Radio ranked third out of 25 college radio stations in The […]]]>

The Princeton Review ranked Blaze Radio as the top college radio station in the nation.

“In my mind, it makes sense that we are finally the best because our members for sure deserve it,” said Blaze radio station manager Autriya Maneshni.

In 2020, Blaze Radio ranked third out of 25 college radio stations in The Princeton Review’s ranking before reaching the top spot for the first time on the most recent list.

Blaze student leaders said their station is unique because it offers a wide variety of opportunities with professional equipment. Maneshni is a journalism major in her fourth and final year with the station.

“It was a very emotional and surreal feeling, especially for those of us who have been at Blaze for four years…to finally see this number one, it means so much to me,” she said.

Blaze Radio offers Arizona State University students of all experience levels a chance to actively learn in an environment that strives for excellence in its content and production process.

“Blaze’s popularity as a whole is really based on our opportunities,” she said. “We teach you how to DJ, we teach you how to anchor radio shows, we teach you how to make pilots, how to make podcasts.”

The student-run organization is ASU’s second largest with over 400 students. Most of the students are from the Cronkite School, but they also have nurses, civil service majors, and students from other fields of study. Program Director Gideon Kariuki is a senior public policy and service student at ASU’s Watts College of Public Service and Community Solutions. He started at Blaze in first grade.

“We attract a lot of people from a wide variety of walks and we hope to continue to develop that; that is, we are proud to be an ASU student radio station for all students,” he said.

Blaze offers 68 specialty shows presented by students. Kariuki starts planning the fall shows in the summer. Spring is the busy season for these shows, so he starts preparing for them in October.

Many student leaders in this program have been there for years. Mallory Schnell, a senior sports journalist, is now in her fourth year with the station. She has been its athletic director since May of this year. Earlier this month, she traveled with Blaze to Oklahoma State University to produce the broadcast of an ASU away football game.

Maneshni said more than 200 listeners tuned in to listen to the Oklahoma State game on Sept. 10. Schnell said Blaze is the starting point as a sports journalist. There are Cronkite alumni who stream for major league sports because they started at Blaze. Families of out-of-state students often tune in to hear what’s happening at ASU, and students studying abroad listen in from around the world.

“Blaze’s reach is going big because our membership is going big,” Kariuki said.

The resort’s seniors look forward to the professional opportunities that will soon arise from their experiences at Blaze. Zachary Bradshaw, a sophomore sports journalism student, is Blaze’s news director.

“It’s like it’s been in the works for so long. Just talking to the seniors who were here last year and the seniors who are here now, this is the place,” Bradshaw said.

He said Blaze allows ASU students to be themselves on the air. This semester, the radio station hosted its largest freshman class to date. Blaze students will celebrate the station’s 40th anniversary this year.

“We graduate knowing that for the four years you have broadcast your voice from the best college radio station in the country,” Maneshni said.

Listen to live music, news, entertainment and sports programming 24/7 on their website, blazeradioonline.com.

To get involved as an ASU student at Blaze, contact stationmanager@blazeradioonline.com.

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Shatta Wale launches new online radio https://colinmarshallradio.com/shatta-wale-launches-new-online-radio/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 09:49:03 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/shatta-wale-launches-new-online-radio/ According to him, the online radio platform is called SM radio with the motto “Music For Life”. Shatta Wale keeps putting herself in the spotlight. He made this public through his official social media accounts. “Ok the wait is over!!!! SM Radio Online!! Are you ready to join the test transmission” – Shatta Wale wrote […]]]>

According to him, the online radio platform is called SM radio with the motto “Music For Life”.

Shatta Wale keeps putting herself in the spotlight.

He made this public through his official social media accounts.

“Ok the wait is over!!!! SM Radio Online!! Are you ready to join the test transmission” – Shatta Wale wrote on her Facebook page.

The “On God” singer also shared the station’s artwork and streaming link, urging his fans to visit the station’s airwaves to enjoy his songs in the meantime.

You will recall that, Shatta Wale first made this revelation in an interview with presenter Dr. Pounds on the show “Hitz Gallery” in 2015, when he said his desire to open a radio station, adding that the main aim of the establishment is to educate young people because some of them look up to it.

“I want to set up forums where they can learn about the benefits of music as well as its business side,” he said in the interview.

However, Shatta Wale’s new radio station has yet to be officially launched. Although there is no APP and frequency obtained, the station’s slogan is “Music 4 Life

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Radio Station WHMI 93.5 FM – News, Weather, Traffic, Sports, School Updates and the Best Classic Hits from Livingston County Michigan https://colinmarshallradio.com/radio-station-whmi-93-5-fm-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hits-from-livingston-county-michigan-30/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 23:00:40 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/radio-station-whmi-93-5-fm-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hits-from-livingston-county-michigan-30/ Getty Images (WASHINGTON) — President Joe Biden turned heads Sunday night when he declared the COVID-19 pandemic “over,” even saying the United States still had a “problem” with the virus. “The pandemic is over,” he said during an interview on CBS’s “60 Minutes.” Biden continued, “We still have a problem with COVID. We’re still working […]]]>
Getty Images

(WASHINGTON) — President Joe Biden turned heads Sunday night when he declared the COVID-19 pandemic “over,” even saying the United States still had a “problem” with the virus.

“The pandemic is over,” he said during an interview on CBS’s “60 Minutes.”

Biden continued, “We still have a problem with COVID. We’re still working a lot on it. It’s – but the pandemic is over.”

His comments come weeks after the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention updated its guidelines for unvaccinated people exposed to COVID.

Data from the federal health agency shows that hundreds of COVID-19-related deaths are being recorded every day and about 14,000 Americans died from the virus last month.

Public health experts told ABC News that this pandemic isn’t over yet, and Biden’s comments may have been a bit premature.

“The pandemic is clearly not over,” Dr. Peter Chin-Hong, an infectious disease specialist at the University of California, San Francisco, told ABC News. “I would highlight the first [reason] that’s the number of deaths per year.”

The United States has recorded more than 223,000 deaths so far this year, according to CDC data.

“That’s several times higher than a typical flu season,” Chin-Hong said, averaging around 35,000 deaths per year from the 2010-11 flu season to the 2019-20 flu season, according to a ABC News analysis of the CDC. The data.

He said if the annual number of deaths from COVID continued to remain high, “it would be much higher than diabetes and other respiratory diseases. This number is not insignificant at all.”

As of September 15, the United States has recorded 655 deaths from COVID-19 and a seven-day rolling average of 391, according to the CDC.

This is the highest seven-day average reported in the country since September 4.

Additionally, an average of 60,000 Americans test positive every day. Although it is not as high as the average of 129,000 recorded during the summer, it is also not as low as the average of 25,000 recorded in the spring.

“My concern about all of this is that when you say the pandemic is over, it becomes synonymous with non-disease,” Dr. Perry Halkitis, dean of the Rutgers School of Public Health, told ABC News. “But we do know that there is a very prevalent disease in the United States that is making people sick and still killing people. This could be troubling due to the increase in respiratory illnesses in the fall.”

At a press conference last Thursday, World Health Organization Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said the end of the pandemic was “in sight”.

“Last week, the number of weekly deaths reported by Covid-19 was the lowest since March 2020,” Ghebreyesus said. “We have never been in a better position to end the pandemic. We are not there yet, but the end is in sight.”

The WHO continues to classify COVID-19 as a public health emergency of international concern and the United States continues to declare the virus a public health emergency, but experts say the country is likely transitioning from a pandemic to an endemic phase.

“So endemic means sort of normal amounts of cases…for the foreseeable future, COVID is here to stay and we should expect COVID cases,” said Dr. Dana Mazo, infectious disease specialist and clinical associate professor. of Medicine at NYU Langone. Health, told ABC News. “What we see is that COVID is here and we all have to learn to live with it.”

She added, “And I think that’s more important than talking about terminology, it’s more important that people understand that COVID hasn’t gone away. It’s unlikely to go away completely anytime soon.”

This is especially important as the United States moves into the fall and colder weather months, when cases traditionally begin to rise and new variants emerge.

Experts worry that people aren’t following mitigation measures and that states and cities won’t be willing to reinstate measures in the event of a surge.

“We’re not as bad as we were in the past, which is a good thing,” said Dr. Julia Raifman, assistant professor of health law, policy and management at Boston University School of Public. Health, which searches at the state level. political responses to the pandemic, told ABC News. “But I remain very concerned that we are unprepared for waves of new variants. And we will likely have a high, almost entirely avoidable cumulative toll.”

“Just being ready to activate them when there’s a surge of a new variant will be very helpful, but there’s no preparation for that right now,” Raifman continued.

Copyright © 2022, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

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I got banned from a big radio station but I don’t know why https://colinmarshallradio.com/i-got-banned-from-a-big-radio-station-but-i-dont-know-why/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 16:58:48 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/i-got-banned-from-a-big-radio-station-but-i-dont-know-why/ Giphy pictures. If you follow this saga, we are now in chapter 2. To make it up to you… Part 1 was yesterday when I blamed Gio from WFAN for putting bad juju in the world about losing your wallet. Gio played on Twitter joking that he has superpowers to cause people to lose things, […]]]>

Giphy pictures.

If you follow this saga, we are now in chapter 2.

To make it up to you… Part 1 was yesterday when I blamed Gio from WFAN for putting bad juju in the world about losing your wallet.

Gio played on Twitter joking that he has superpowers to cause people to lose things, or teams he destroys, etc.

I was pretty sure Gio recognized his bad juju, but I had to call and make sure he recognized it. So I called the show.

Gio admitted his mistake, especially after threatening to talk to management, aka his former boss Mike Francesa (whom he makes an impression on). I did a Chris Russo impression, he did Mike, we shared some laughs.

Then Gio mentioned that Al Dukes couldn’t take my call because my number was blocked on their calling system.

Giphy pictures.

I was shocked. How could I, the number 1 caller on terrestrial and satellite radio, be blocked by the biggest radio station in New York and a place I didn’t listen to growing up, but called a ton , and even appeared as a guest?

He also said that I only called 92 times and was on air once…

A quick check of the files shows this to be very wrong.

Like the time I called Mike Francesa to wish him a happy birthday and give him a pickaxe (spoiler – it won with ease).

Or the time I called Mike Francesa and tried to talk about horses, to which he quickly said “I’m not a HAWSE guy”

Or the time I walked into a match screaming about Derek Jeter

So Gio clearly got the facts wrong, maybe I’ll have to call Monday to get another apology. But nevertheless, Gio asks how this could have happened.

I know I had only been on air with Boomer and Gio once in my life and that was when I trashed Doug Gottlieb, so I explained that must have been the reason.

Gio seemed to agree and swore that now that WFAN knows my number and resume, even though I’m still stuck, they’ll take my calls in the future. Happy ending for me and Gio for sure.

The real story here is that Boomer Esiason is NOT a ryder. He had to text Frannie Lydon aka Hank and was persuaded to join the red-light district gang run by the best of Scituate.

He researched public transportation and my cell phone service.

Overall, I think some laughed, but we need to find out who silenced me at WFAN and blocked my number. I was really upset to hear this, and I’m glad we worked it out, but I really need to know who would want to shut me up so badly that they went into the system and blocked my number…

I know one thing… my man Tom Izzo would never do that.

Maybe one day we will have our answer. This saga continues…

Here is the full call..

happy friday

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Texas Music Experience online radio station plays only music from Texas https://colinmarshallradio.com/texas-music-experience-online-radio-station-plays-only-music-from-texas/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 09:32:57 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/texas-music-experience-online-radio-station-plays-only-music-from-texas/ Beyonce appears at the 63rd Annual Grammy Awards in Los Angeles on March 14, 2021. Photo: Chris Pizzello/Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP Even the marketing bumpers hint at something special: “A playlist as wide as the Lone Star State.” “Thank you for coming as fast as you could.” If only “Don’t Mess With Texas” wasn’t protected by that […]]]>

Beyonce appears at the 63rd Annual Grammy Awards in Los Angeles on March 14, 2021.

Photo: Chris Pizzello/Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP

Even the marketing bumpers hint at something special: “A playlist as wide as the Lone Star State.” “Thank you for coming as fast as you could.” If only “Don’t Mess With Texas” wasn’t protected by that pesky trademark issue.

Welcome to Texas Music Experience, a streaming station that streams Texas artists 24/7, regardless of genre or era. Available on any computer or smartphone via the eye-catching tmx.fm URL, the site is a highly entertaining tutorial on the true breadth of the Texas music landscape. Imagine Freddy King in St. Vincent in Chamillionaire; or Spoon in Gene Autry in Kenny and the Kasuals; or Albert Collins in The Black Angels in Nelly. (Yes, Nelly.) At TMX, it’s routine.

“There are so many diverse voices and influences just within our borders, it’s amazing we have enough to create a 24/7 music service,” says Matt Reilly, Director of Austin’s KUTX-FM program, which hosts and operates TMX.

“I don’t imagine you would be able to do that with really many other states,” he adds. “Maybe California, maybe New York, but you don’t hear about the Indiana musical experience. There are great artists in every state of the union, but not enough to sustain a super diverse music service like TMX.

Texas Music Experience

Where: Broadcast on tmx.fm

Although indirectly, TMX grew out of the deep mediocrity of Houston’s radio scene. Growing up in Memorial, Reilly found himself frustrated with its lack of variety, even though the 80s were arguably as good as they ever were (at least for commercial radio). It certainly hasn’t improved.

“I remember when the Top 40 was Prince, Van Halen, [and] Bruce Springsteen all at the same time, and Kool and the Gang or Michael Jackson or whatever,” he says. “There were some brilliant flashes on the radio in Houston, but it was never sustained. I could never get more than an hour of really, for me, what I thought was great radio at a time. I really wanted to get into radio, and I just wanted to do better.

KUTX, the music-only twin of the capital’s longtime public radio KUT, is everything commercial Houston radio isn’t: curious, carefully curated, intensely community-focused. For a few years now, he’s hosted a stream made up entirely of Austin artists on one of his HD channels; this station plays over the Austin airport sound system, welcoming travelers to the live music capital of the world with a dose of one if its major exports.

After the KUTX engineer told him bandwidth was available, Reilly came up with the idea of ​​creating another HD channel using only Texas artists; TMX signed last May. Its online nature and advertiser-free format make it easy to assume that these songs are randomly spit out by a computer, but in this case, an actual human being is behind it: longtime Austin radio personality Susan Castle, Reilly’s colleague at KUTX.

“That was my kind of marching order for her,” Reilly says. “Let’s say it’s playing in a restaurant and a family of four come in and sit down and it’s playing and they hear it: in a set of four songs, both parents, both children; if you have grandma with you, grandpa, they will also hear something. [We’re] trying to reach everyone and just trying to keep it as diverse, stylistically, as possible.

There’s a strange cohesion to its diversity: spend a few hours listening, and patterns begin to emerge. One is the number of artists that many might be surprised to have Texas ties to: Elliot Smith spent part of his childhood in Dallas; Khruangbin is from Space City, not outer space; Nelly, so closely identified with St. Louis, was born in Austin. Another is the number of artists who have reached the top of their respective genres: Ornette Coleman, Sly & the Family Stone, Janis Joplin, Miranda Lambert, Buddy Holly, Beyoncé, George Strait, Lizzo, Selena and so many more.

It’s still very early in the game, but – understandably – TMX feels like it can get a lot bigger. Reilly recently sought feedback from esteemed Texas musicians such as Asleep at the Wheel’s Ray Benson and Adrian Quesada of the Black Pumas, asking them what else was missing, and is exploring possible promotional ties with the Texas Music Office. He can imagine the station playing over the speakers at AT&T Stadium or Minute Maid Park, or maybe the ultimate TMX team.

“If you go to HEB, everything is Texas brand, right down to the tortilla chips,” he says. “But the music is not. It’s the only thing that isn’t.

For now, anyway.

“HEB, call me,” Reilly said. “I love talking about it.”

Chris Gray is a Galveston-based writer.




  • cary darling

    Cary Darling joined the Houston Chronicle in 2017 where he writes about arts, entertainment and pop culture, with a focus on film and media. A native of Los Angeles and a graduate of Loyola Marymount University, he was a reporter or editor at the Orange County Register, the Miami Herald and the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. Additionally, he has freelanced for a number of publications, including the Los Angeles Times and the Dallas Morning News.

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Collins supports a bicultural city – Waatea News: Māori Radio Station https://colinmarshallradio.com/collins-supports-a-bicultural-city-waatea-news-maori-radio-station/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 23:57:59 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/collins-supports-a-bicultural-city-waatea-news-maori-radio-station/ Funding of roles: Auckland mayoral candidate Efeso Collins said it was time for the super city to embrace its distinct bicultural relationship. Mr Collins said during the election campaign it was clear many would like to backtrack on New Zealand’s treatment of Maori and revert to an approach that ignores treaty obligations. He says that […]]]>

Funding of roles:

Auckland mayoral candidate Efeso Collins said it was time for the super city to embrace its distinct bicultural relationship.

Mr Collins said during the election campaign it was clear many would like to backtrack on New Zealand’s treatment of Maori and revert to an approach that ignores treaty obligations.

He says that Maori identity is Aotearoa’s point of difference in the world and that iwi mana whenua, as the traditional kaitiaki of Tamaki Makaurau, should have more influence on how the town develops. adapts to growth and meets future social, cultural, economic and environmental challenges.

He wants to see Maori neighborhoods in place by 2025 to increase elected Maori representation.

It will also support Maori heritage and identity by naming municipal facilities, public roads and public spaces such as the park.

Mr Collins says he will support training initiatives for council staff and elected members, as well as increase the Maori initiatives fund in the council’s long-term plan 2024-34 to support a 10-year program of marae renovation, papakāinga development and other Maori community initiatives. .


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Police warned of privacy breaches https://colinmarshallradio.com/police-warned-of-privacy-breaches/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 02:47:02 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/police-warned-of-privacy-breaches/ Pierre Verschaffelt Selection of Liz MacPherson | Deputy Privacy Commissioner Funding of roles: The Privacy Commission says systemic reform may be needed to prevent police from illegally taking and storing pictures of rangatahi. Deputy Commissioner Liz MacPherson said the commissioner issued an order in December ordering police to stop collecting duplicate fingerprints and photographs of […]]]>

Pierre Verschaffelt

Selection of Liz MacPherson | Deputy Privacy Commissioner

Funding of roles:

The Privacy Commission says systemic reform may be needed to prevent police from illegally taking and storing pictures of rangatahi.

Deputy Commissioner Liz MacPherson said the commissioner issued an order in December ordering police to stop collecting duplicate fingerprints and photographs of youths in custody and taking pictures of youths in public places without cause valid.

She says a follow-up investigation carried out jointly with the Independent Police Complaints Authority after complaints about Wairarapa police collecting photographs of rangatahi on the street found that frontline police appeared unaware of the privacy laws.

“Our recommendations to the police have been to improve their policies, their curriculum, their training and to make sure that the frontline police are really well equipped with advice to enable them to make good decisions when faced with to a situation in which she finds herself. trying to make a call to see if they should take a picture or not,” Ms MacPherson says.

The Privacy Commissioner ordered that all illegally taken photos be deleted.


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