covid pandemic – Colin Marshall Radio http://colinmarshallradio.com/ Fri, 25 Mar 2022 14:18:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://colinmarshallradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-1-1-120x120.png covid pandemic – Colin Marshall Radio http://colinmarshallradio.com/ 32 32 Mobile Radio Station Market Growth Drivers with Relevance Mapping by Key Players like Motorola, JVCKENWOOD, Icom, Hytera, Sepura, Cobra, etc. https://colinmarshallradio.com/mobile-radio-station-market-growth-drivers-with-relevance-mapping-by-key-players-like-motorola-jvckenwood-icom-hytera-sepura-cobra-etc/ Sat, 12 Mar 2022 10:42:48 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/mobile-radio-station-market-growth-drivers-with-relevance-mapping-by-key-players-like-motorola-jvckenwood-icom-hytera-sepura-cobra-etc/ The Mobile Radio Station Market report provides detailed analysis of global market size, regional and country level market size, segmentation market growth, market share, competitive landscape , sales analysis, impact of domestic and global market players such as Motorola, JVCKENWOOD, Icom, Hytera, Sepura, Cobra, etc., value chain optimization, business regulations, recent developments, opportunity analysis, strategic […]]]>

The Mobile Radio Station Market report provides detailed analysis of global market size, regional and country level market size, segmentation market growth, market share, competitive landscape , sales analysis, impact of domestic and global market players such as Motorola, JVCKENWOOD, Icom, Hytera, Sepura, Cobra, etc., value chain optimization, business regulations, recent developments, opportunity analysis, strategic market growth analysis, product launches, regional market expansion and technological innovations.

Key areas that were targeted in the report:

  • Key trends observed in the global mobile radio station market
  • Market and pricing issues
  • The extent of commerciality in the market
  • Geographical limits
  • Distribution, planning, performance and supplier requirements
  • Growth opportunities that may emerge in the industry in the coming years
  • Growth strategies envisaged by the actors.

Get an Exclusive Sample of Mobile Radio Stations Market Report @ https://www.affluencemarketreports.com/industry-analysis/request-sample/2193770/

Mobile Radio Station Market Segmentation:

Mobile Radio Station market is split by Type and by Application. For the period 2016-2028, the growth between segments provides accurate calculations and forecasts for sales by type and by application in terms of volume and value. This analysis can help you grow your business by targeting qualified niche markets.

Mobile Radio Station Market Report Based on Product Type:

  • Analog military mobile radio station
  • Digital military mobile radio station

Application-Based Mobile Radio Station Market Report:

  • Government and public safety
  • Utilities
  • Industry and Commerce
  • Others

Key Market Players for the Global Mobile Radio Stations Market are listed below:

  • Motorola
  • JVCKENWOOD
  • I’m coming
  • Hytera
  • Sepura
  • Tai
  • Cobra
  • yaesu
  • Entel Group
  • Uniden
  • Midland
  • BFDX
  • Kirisun
  • Quansheng
  • HQT
  • Neolink

Get Extra Discount on Mobile Radio Stations Market Report, If your company is listed in the list of key players above @ https://www.affluencemarketreports.com/industry-analysis/request-discount/2193770/

Promising Regions & Countries Mentioned In The Mobile Radio Stations Market Report:

  • North America [United States, Canada, Mexico]
  • South America [Brazil, Argentina, Columbia, Chile, Peru]
  • Europe [Germany, UK, France, Italy, Russia, Spain, Netherlands, Turkey, Switzerland]
  • Middle East and Africa [GCC, North Africa, South Africa]
  • Asia Pacific [China, Southeast Asia, India, Japan, Korea, Western Asia]

TABLE OF CONTENTS UNDERSTAND

Consumption Forecast, Market Opportunities and Challenges, Risk and Influence Factor Analysis, Market Size by Application, Market Size by Manufacturers, Market Size by Type, Mobile Radio Station Consumption by Regions, Station Production Mobile Radio Stations by Regions, Production Forecast, Value Chain, and Sales Channel Analysis, Key Findings of Global Mobile Radio Stations Research, Manufacturers Profiles

Report customization: Customers can request customization of the report according to their need for additional data.

CONTACT FOR ADDITIONAL CUSTOMIZATION @ https://www.affluencemarketreports.com/industry-analysis/request-inquiry/2193770/

  1. Overview of the mobile radio station market
  2. Company Profiles: Motorola, JVCKENWOOD, Icom, Hytera, Sepura, Tait, Cobra, Yaesu, Entel Group, Uniden, Midland, BFDX, Kirisun, Quansheng, HQT, Neolink
  3. Mobile Radio Station Sales by Key Players
  4. Mobile Radio Station Market Analysis by Region
  5. Mobile Radio Stations Market Segment By Type: Analog Military Mobile Radio Station, Digital Military Mobile Radio Station
  6. Mobile Radio Station Market Segment By Application: Government and Public Safety, Utilities, Industry and Commerce, Others
  7. North America by Country, by Type and by Application
  8. Europe by Country, by Type and by Application
  9. Asia-Pacific by Country, by Type and by Application
  10. South America by Country, by Type and by Application
  11. Middle East and Africa by Country, by Type and by Application
  12. Sales channel, distributors, traders and resellers
  13. Research results and conclusion
  14. appendix

Impact of COVID-19 on the Mobile Radio Station Market

The report also contains the effect of the ongoing global pandemic i.e. COVID-19 on the Mobile Radio Station market and what the future holds for it. It offers an analysis of the impacts of the epidemic on the international market. The epidemic immediately interrupted the series of need and supply. The Mobile Radio Stations Market report also assesses the economic effect on business and money markets. Futuristic Reports has accrued guidance from multiple delegates from this company and engaged from secondary and primary research to extending clients with strategies and data to combat industry struggles throughout and after the COVID-19 pandemic.

For more details on the impact of COVID-19 on the Mobile Radio Stations Market https://www.affluencemarketreports.com/industry-analysis/covid19-request/2193770/

Frequently Asked Questions

  • What is the scope of the Mobile Radio Station market report?
  • Does this report estimate the current Mobile Radio Station market size?
  • Does the report provide the Mobile Radio Station market size in terms of – value (million US$) and volume (thousands of units) – of the market?
  • What segments are covered in this report?
  • What are the key factors covered in this Mobile Radio Stations market report?
  • Does this report offer customization?

About Affluence:

Affluence Market Reports is the next generation of all your research needs with a strong grip on the global market for industries, organizations and governments. Our goal is to provide exemplary reports that meet the exact needs of the clients, which offer the right business technique, planning and competitive landscape for new and existing industries that will develop your business needs.

We provide a premium in-depth statistical approach, a 360 degree view of the market which includes detailed segmentation, key trends, strategic recommendations, growth figures, cost analysis, new advancements, evolving technologies and forecasts from authentic agencies.

For more details, contact us:

Affluence Market Reports

Contact: Mr Rohit

Phone number:

USA: +1-(424) 256-1722

UK: +44 1158 88 1333

E-mail: [email protected]

Website: www.affluencemarketreports.com

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Colorado Inmates Begin Broadcasting on America’s First Statewide Prison Radio Station – The Burlington Record https://colinmarshallradio.com/colorado-inmates-begin-broadcasting-on-americas-first-statewide-prison-radio-station-the-burlington-record/ Sat, 05 Mar 2022 12:56:15 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/colorado-inmates-begin-broadcasting-on-americas-first-statewide-prison-radio-station-the-burlington-record/ LIMON — Audio producers and on-air talent crammed into the makeshift studio on Tuesday, adjusting levels and donning headphones as they prepared to launch Colorado’s new radio station. “Launch Day!” shouted a producer as the staff cowered in front of the microphones, a palpable hum permeating the windowless room. Large white posters hung on a […]]]>

LIMON — Audio producers and on-air talent crammed into the makeshift studio on Tuesday, adjusting levels and donning headphones as they prepared to launch Colorado’s new radio station.

“Launch Day!” shouted a producer as the staff cowered in front of the microphones, a palpable hum permeating the windowless room. Large white posters hung on a nearby wall detailing the new station’s mission, values ​​and impacts.

“In an artistic space”, said a poster, “there are no failures”.

It’s not Colorado Public Radio or Hits 95.7. This is Limon Correctional Facility, a sprawling Level IV prison in the Eastern Plains of Colorado that houses more than 700 inmates behind a 4,000 foot long double perimeter fence.

Inside plexiglass walls, surrounded by soundproof foam, a collection of giddy men in green jumpsuits presented Inside Wire: Colorado Prison Radio, the first state-run radio station in U.S. history on Tuesday. be recorded and produced inside prison walls and transmitted to anyone with an internet connection anywhere in the world.

“Returning to the community makes us worth again as human beings,” said Anthony Quintana, 51, who has spent the past 33 years behind bars for murder but has been invigorated by his new role as engineer and director of operations for the burgeoning radio station.

Inside Wire, the first statewide prison radio station, launched on March 1, 2022 inside the Limon Correctional Facility.

The program’s goal is to change the narrative of the more than 14,000 people housed in Colorado prisons.

“It’s a truly monumental moment,” Ashley Hamilton, executive director and co-founder of the University of Denver’s Prison Arts Initiative, told the audience.

The idea had been in the making for a year and a half, born in the depths of the COVID-19 pandemic. In November 2020, DU and the Department of Corrections launched A/LIVE Inside, a virtual showcase for incarcerated artists and storytellers to share their work from Colorado prisons. Program staff realized they could use the closed-circuit system inside the prisons to broadcast the event.

“We thought, ‘What else could we do? ‘” Hamilton said. She pitched the idea to Dean Williams, executive director of the Colorado Department of Corrections.

The head of the state’s corrections system took office in 2019 with a reform-minded vision, promising to “normalize” life behind bars. Williams green-lit a podcast recorded in Colorado prisons, as well as an inmate-run newspaper and a touring production of “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.”

Colorado Prison Radio, Williams told the Denver Post, is a continuation of that normalization movement.

“It’s about making prison more human,” Williams said after taping.

Limon Correctional Facility inmate Anthony Quintana...
Limon Correctional Facility inmate Anthony Quintana, who has been in prison for 33 years, now works at the prison’s first statewide radio station as the station’s engineer and manager. of operations on March 1, 2022. Quintana hung family photos and other decorations on the wall where he works at the prison radio station, called Inside Wire.

The executive director appeared on Tuesday’s kickoff show and plans to appear on a weekly show called ‘Up to the Minute with Dean Williams’, in which incarcerated residents will talk to him about anything and everything.

The station, funded by the DU Prison Arts Initiative, operates 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and includes musical programs, conversations between inmates and correctional staff, and an audio message board for Department residents. correctional services.

The station is not actually broadcast on AM or FM radio, but can be streamed online or through the Inside Wire app. It is also broadcast to every cell in Colorado’s 21 correctional facilities via closed-circuit televisions.

Jody Aguirre, 58, had never played with audio until he signed on as Inside Wire’s engagement producer and host of a Tuesday morning music show.

He first went to prison in 1994 for murder and served a stint in solitary confinement. There is no release date on the horizon.

“When you come here you lose hope,” Aguirre said.

But after spending 10 years angry and bitter, Aguirre made a promise to his mother: “I will live to make her proud.”

He took a creative writing course, and now he mixes 80s new wave, deep house and jazz on his Tuesday radio show.

“People here live honorable lives,” Aguirre said.

Inmate Herbert Alexander, who was...
Inmate Herbert Alexander, pictured at Limon Correctional Facility on March 1, 2022, is the production manager for a new prison radio station. Alexander took a moment outside the sound booth before heading back inside to help the station, called Inside Wire, kick off its opening schedule.

Herbert Alexander, 46, can’t stop talking to his family outside the new radio station.

The rumor mill inside the prison is strong, he said. So Alexander, who is the production manager of Inside Wire, is particularly excited about the show with Williams to give residents real information about new legislation or policies that affect them on a daily basis.

“A lot of guys don’t know about this information,” Alexander said. “We’re giving you Dean’s voice.”

Alexander has been incarcerated for 13 years for aggravated robbery and is eligible for parole within the next two years. He hopes to use his DU certificate in audio production to find work in this field once back outside.

“Most offenders go home at some point,” Alexander said outside the studio. “So when they do, don’t we want them to be better men?”

The incarcerated men gathered in a room after the show was taped on Tuesday, waving and shouting via video to their fellow radio hosts inside the Sterling Correctional Facility and the Denver Women’s Correctional Facility, where broadcasts will also be recorded and produced. (All shows are pre-recorded and reviewed before they hit the airwaves, though Hamilton says they didn’t have to remove content from any of the taped shows before this week’s debut.)

As he watched from the back of the room, Seth Ready became emotional. This project is personal to Ready, who spent 18 years behind bars but now works for the DU Prison Arts Initiative as a communications associate.

Darrius Turner, an inmate at Limon Correctional Facility,...
Limon Correctional Facility inmate Darrius Turner works at the Inside Wire radio station from inside the prison on March 1, 2022.

“It’s been one of the best days of my life,” he told the men and women on the video call.

Finally, it was time to hear the final product, the culmination of a year of work.

The intro music came on the computer and Quintana couldn’t help but giggle as she took a bite of her fruit salad. Cheers filled the prison library. Quintana waved her fist, smiling broadly. Hamilton let out a deep exhaled sigh.

Alexandre’s voice swept over the airwaves: “We have a vision: To create something by us, for us.

Quintana shouted, “That’s the hook!” as he sang on the chorus: “Inside…inside…the wire!”

Alexandre soaks up the moment.

“Knowing that everyone can hear it,” he said afterward, “is like, wow.”

]]>
Colorado inmates launch first US statewide prison radio station https://colinmarshallradio.com/colorado-inmates-launch-first-us-statewide-prison-radio-station/ Fri, 04 Mar 2022 01:06:47 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/colorado-inmates-launch-first-us-statewide-prison-radio-station/ LIMON — Audio producers and on-air talent crammed into the makeshift studio on Tuesday, adjusting levels and donning headphones as they prepared to launch the new Colorado radio station. “Launch Day!” shouted a producer as the staff cowered in front of the microphones, a palpable hum permeating the windowless room. Large white posters hung on […]]]>

LIMON — Audio producers and on-air talent crammed into the makeshift studio on Tuesday, adjusting levels and donning headphones as they prepared to launch the new Colorado radio station.

“Launch Day!” shouted a producer as the staff cowered in front of the microphones, a palpable hum permeating the windowless room. Large white posters hung on a nearby wall detailing the new station’s mission, values ​​and impacts.

“In an artistic space”, said a poster, “there are no failures”.

It’s not Colorado Public Radio or Hits 95.7. This is Limon Correctional Facility, a sprawling Level IV prison in the Eastern Plains of Colorado that houses more than 700 inmates behind a 4,000 foot long double perimeter fence.

Inside plexiglass walls, surrounded by soundproof foam, a collection of giddy men in green jumpsuits presented Inside Wire: Colorado Prison Radio, the first state-run radio station in U.S. history on Tuesday. be recorded and produced inside prison walls and transmitted to anyone with an Internet connection anywhere in the world.

“Returning to the community makes us worth again as human beings,” said Anthony Quintana, 51, who has spent the past 33 years behind bars for murder but has been invigorated by his new role as engineer and director of operations for the burgeoning radio station.

Inside Wire, the first statewide prison radio station, launched on March 1, 2022 inside the Limon Correctional Facility.

The program’s goal is to change the narrative of the more than 14,000 people housed in Colorado prisons.

“It’s a truly monumental moment,” Ashley Hamilton, executive director and co-founder of the University of Denver’s Prison Arts Initiative, told the audience.

The idea had been in the making for a year and a half, born in the depths of the COVID-19 pandemic. In November 2020, DU and the Department of Corrections launched A/LIVE Inside, a virtual showcase for incarcerated artists and storytellers to share their work from Colorado prisons. Program staff realized they could use the closed-circuit system inside the prisons to broadcast the event.

“We thought, ‘What else could we do? ‘” Hamilton said. She pitched the idea to Dean Williams, executive director of the Colorado Department of Corrections.

The head of the state’s corrections system took office in 2019 with a reform-minded vision, promising to “normalize” life behind bars. Williams green-lit a podcast recorded in Colorado prisons, as well as an inmate-run newspaper and a touring production of “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.”

Colorado Prison Radio, Williams told the Denver Post, is a continuation of that normalization movement.

“It’s about making prison more human,” Williams said after taping.

Limon Correctional Facility inmate Anthony Quintana...
Limon Correctional Facility inmate Anthony Quintana, who has been in prison for 33 years, now works at the prison’s first statewide radio station as the station’s engineer and manager. of operations on March 1, 2022. Quintana hung family photos and other decorations on the wall where he works at the prison radio station, called Inside Wire.

The executive director appeared on Tuesday’s kickoff show and plans to appear on a weekly show called ‘Up to the Minute with Dean Williams’, in which incarcerated residents will talk to him about anything and everything.

The station, funded by the DU Prison Arts Initiative, operates 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and includes musical programs, conversations between inmates and correctional staff, and an audio message board for Department residents. correctional services.

The station is not actually broadcast on AM or FM radio, but can be streamed online or through the Inside Wire app. It is also broadcast to every cell in Colorado’s 21 correctional facilities via closed-circuit televisions.

Jody Aguirre, 58, had never played with audio until he signed on as Inside Wire’s engagement producer and host of a Tuesday morning music show.

He first went to prison in 1994 for murder and served a stint in solitary confinement. There is no release date on the horizon.

“When you come here you lose hope,” Aguirre said.

But after spending 10 years angry and bitter, Aguirre made a promise to his mother: “I will live to make her proud.”

He took a creative writing course, and now he mixes 80s new wave, deep house and jazz on his Tuesday radio show.

“People here live honorable lives,” Aguirre said.

Inmate Herbert Alexander, who was...
Inmate Herbert Alexander, pictured at Limon Correctional Facility on March 1, 2022, is the production manager for a new prison radio station. Alexander took a moment outside the sound booth before heading back inside to help the station, called Inside Wire, kick off its opening schedule.

Herbert Alexander, 46, can’t stop talking to his family outside the new radio station.

The rumor mill inside the prison is strong, he said. So Alexander, who is the production manager of Inside Wire, is particularly excited about the show with Williams to give residents real information about new legislation or policies that affect them on a daily basis.

“A lot of guys don’t know about this information,” Alexander said. “We’re giving you Dean’s voice.”

Alexander has been incarcerated for 13 years for aggravated robbery and is eligible for parole within the next two years. He hopes to use his DU certificate in audio production to find work in this field once back outside.

“Most offenders go home at some point,” Alexander said outside the studio. “So when they do, don’t we want them to be better men?”

The incarcerated men gathered in a room after the show was taped on Tuesday, waving and shouting via video to their fellow radio hosts inside Sterling Correctional Facility and the Denver Women’s Correctional Facility, where broadcasts will also be recorded and produced. (All shows are pre-recorded and reviewed before they hit the airwaves, though Hamilton says they didn’t have to remove content from any of the taped shows before this week’s debut.)

As he watched from the back of the room, Seth Ready became emotional. This project is personal to Ready, who spent 18 years behind bars but now works for the DU Prison Arts Initiative as a communications associate.

Darrius Turner, an inmate at Limon Correctional Facility,...
Limon Correctional Facility inmate Darrius Turner works at the Inside Wire radio station from inside the prison on March 1, 2022.

“It’s been one of the best days of my life,” he told the men and women on the video call.

Finally, it was time to hear the final product, the culmination of a year of work.

The intro music came on the computer and Quintana couldn’t help but laugh as she took a bite of her fruit salad. Cheers filled the prison library. Quintana waved her fist, smiling broadly. Hamilton let out a deep exhaled sigh.

Alexandre’s voice swept over the airwaves: “We have a vision: To create something by us, for us.

Quintana shouted, “That’s the hook!” as he sang on the chorus: “Inside…inside…the wire!”

Alexandre soaks up the moment.

“Knowing that everyone can hear it,” he said afterward, “is like, wow.”

]]>
Radio Station WHMI 93.5 FM – News, Weather, Traffic, Sports, School Updates and the Best Classic Hits from Livingston County Michigan https://colinmarshallradio.com/radio-station-whmi-93-5-fm-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hits-from-livingston-county-michigan-6/ Sat, 19 Feb 2022 19:24:42 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/radio-station-whmi-93-5-fm-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hits-from-livingston-county-michigan-6/ ABC News (NEW YORK) — The bridge that connects Hidalgo, Texas, to Reynosa, Mexico, has become a path of uncertainty and fear for thousands of families seeking opportunity. Amid continued ambiguity over US immigration policies, a migrant encampment has grown to around 2,200 in the past year, according to estimates from nonprofits working in the […]]]>
ABC News

(NEW YORK) — The bridge that connects Hidalgo, Texas, to Reynosa, Mexico, has become a path of uncertainty and fear for thousands of families seeking opportunity.

Amid continued ambiguity over US immigration policies, a migrant encampment has grown to around 2,200 in the past year, according to estimates from nonprofits working in the region. . The Sea of ​​Tents is about a block from the International Bridge in the city of Reynosa in northern Mexico.

Jessica Leon, a Salvadoran mother who has been in Reynosa for seven months with her young children, told ABC News that life in the camp is “dangerous” and “difficult”.

“We are exposed to many dangers here, like cartels, for example. Anyone can come in here at any time. We are extremely vulnerable to many dangers,” she said.

“I’ve been waiting for asylum, and we’ve been waiting for a long time. And when you don’t see results, you feel hopeless,” Leon added.

As the families face harsh living conditions, the fate of their trips depends in part on how long the Biden administration continues to use Title 42, a policy reinforced by the Trump administration during the pandemic. It allows US Customs and Border Protection to deport thousands of migrants amid the COVID-19 pandemic without giving them the opportunity to seek asylum in the United States.

Title 42 refers to a clause in the Public Health Services Act of 1944 that allows the government to prevent migrants from entering the United States during public health emergencies; however, defenders challenging the administration’s use of the order in court have argued that US law does not allow the government to deport people seeking asylum without due process.

Customs and Border Protection encountered 1.7 million people at the US-Mexico border in 2021, according to data released by the agency last month – the highest on record in a year. About 1.2 million people encountered were deported under Title 42, CBP said.

.@ABCMireya speaks exclusively to the head of the U.S. Border Patrol who is preparing his officers for a possible change in policy, as migrant families continue to be in limbo in Mexico. “I don’t have enough agents, I know I don’t have enough equipment,” he says. https://t.co/x8J07soSZR pic.twitter.com/RHhwEhUfN1

— ABC News Live (@ABCNewsLive) February 18, 2022

US Border Patrol Chief Raul Ortiz spoke exclusively to ABC News correspondent Mireya Villarreal about the growing problems along the border. Although he recognizes that Title 42 is a tool they would like to continue using, his agency is preparing for it to eventually disappear.

“We know this won’t last forever as the health pandemic begins to wane…that we may not have Title 42 forever,” Ortiz said. “So we have to make adjustments to be able to prepare for that. And so what I’m doing is making sure that I have treatment coordinators who can do some of those tasks and responsibilities, and then m to ensure our officers are safe.”

“You know, at one point I had two, three thousand officers in quarantine almost every day,” he added. “Right now I have maybe two or three hundred in quarantine. So we’re protecting ourselves better. And I think that’s some of those things that have to happen for us to be successful.”

Chief Ortiz said he recognizes declining morale and regularly reminds officers not to get drawn into political discussions.

“I know I don’t have enough agents, I know I don’t have enough equipment, and then I know I have to close some doors and gaps. That would put us in a better position to be successful.” , he added.

Title 42 was strengthened during the pandemic by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In a statement to ABC News, CDC officials said that every 60 days the agency reviews “the status of the COVID-19 pandemic and associated public health risks.”

The latest assessment completed in late January determined that the use of Title 42 remains “in effect,” the CDC said, citing the impact of the pandemic and an “increase in cases and hospitalizations since December due to the highly transferable from Omicron”. “

Across the border in Reynosa, Mexico, Felicia Rangel-Samponaro, principal of The Sidewalk School, an American nonprofit organization that runs solely on donations, told ABC News that the school “should grow at a very rapid pace” to accommodate a surge in child asylum seekers from various countries.

The organization provides clothes and food to families who lack resources and live in conditions that make cooking extremely difficult.

Rangel-Samponaro said she has seen the encampment grow every day as the number of migrants has increased and said the problem “never stopped” under the Biden administration.

“There are no white asylum seekers in this camp, and that’s what people should be asking themselves. Why is it different for white asylum seekers? ?” she says.

A few miles away, Pastor Hector Silva runs the Senda De Vida Shelter – part of the Senda De Vida Ministry House, which has been providing support to migrant families for over two decades.

Silva said most families crossing the border return after running out of money, and the shelter provides them with food and clothing as they face a life in limbo.

Jessica Leon has a brother who lives in Houston, Texas, and hopes to give her children a “good future” in the United States, because in El Salvador they struggled with poverty and lack of job opportunities.

Leon said she and her children live in a tent with a mattress that her children share, while she sleeps on the floor.

“For love and to achieve our dreams, we endure, but it’s very difficult,” she said.

Next week, the Biden administration plans to begin processing and admitting migrants forced to wait in Mexico under the Trump administration’s “migrant protection protocols,” three administration officials told ABC. News.

The Biden administration is currently engaged in a legal battle with a coalition of civil rights groups, led by the American Civil Liberties Union, over its use of Title 42.

The White House defended its use of the public health order in federal court just last month, arguing that lifting it would lead to overcrowding at DHS facilities and that an influx of migrants poses a risk to public health.

Rangel-Samponaro said migrants caught in limbo are hoping changes in US immigration policies will give them a chance for a fresh start.

“What you see is hope for Biden to win the 42nd title, which he can anytime he wants,” Rangel-Sampanaro said. Eliminating the use of Title 42 would give migrants a chance to apply for asylum, he said.

And for the families living in the Reynosa camp, the hope for a better future for their children keeps them going.

“Believe me it’s difficult, please keep us in mind because there are a lot of families who are hurting. Children are the most vulnerable,” Leon said.

ABC News’ William Gallego, Luke Barr and Quinn Owen contributed to this report.

Copyright © 2022, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

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Harford Community College launches new STEM-based programs and radio show – Baltimore Sun https://colinmarshallradio.com/harford-community-college-launches-new-stem-based-programs-and-radio-show-baltimore-sun/ Wed, 09 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/harford-community-college-launches-new-stem-based-programs-and-radio-show-baltimore-sun/ Harford County Community College (HCC) is implementing four new science, engineering, technology, and math (STEM) credit programs and launched “HCC 360,” a new talk show on its radio station, highlighting the diverse college educational options for students to contribute to the economic growth of the local community. With the new talk show and college credit […]]]>

Harford County Community College (HCC) is implementing four new science, engineering, technology, and math (STEM) credit programs and launched “HCC 360,” a new talk show on its radio station, highlighting the diverse college educational options for students to contribute to the economic growth of the local community.

With the new talk show and college credit programs, HCC seeks to help students find the high-demand skills they need while helping local employers match their job openings with qualified talent and competent.

The Maryland Higher Education Commission recently approved four HCC credit programs: a certificate in geospatial technology; an Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degree program in biotechnology; and an associate of science degree program and a certificate in data science. The commission also approved a significantly revised certificate program in biotechnology.

“Harford’s updated certificate and new AAS degree in biotechnology will allow graduates to join the growing biotechnology workforce in Maryland, Virginia and DC, which is expected to double from its current level of 300,000 by 2023,” according to a press release from the college. . “The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has increased the demand for highly skilled employees in the biotech workforce.”

Biotechnology certificate and diploma programs allow for shorter timelines for graduation and direct entry into the workforce, or transitioning to a four-year program at the University of Maryland Baltimore County at Shady Grove or the University of Maryland Global Campus, depending on the college.

The Geospatial Technology Certificate program provides students with the skills, knowledge, and practical experience needed to pursue a career in geospatial technology. The program offers a full range of geographic information systems, remote sensing and global positioning systems.

The Data Science Certificate is suitable for people with existing credentials who want to further their skills in this field, and the Data Science Associate Degree is designed for students who want to transition to a four-year program at the Loyola University of Maryland or University of Maryland Global Campus.

The college recently launched a radio show, “HCC 360,” on its campus station, WHFC 91.1 FM. The show will showcase workforce training, forensics courses, new biotechnology programs and other offerings.

“‘HCC 360’ reflects that there is something for everyone at Harford,” the university school said in a press release.

“HCC 360” airs monthly on first Mondays at 6:30 p.m. on WHFC 91.1 FM and is available as a podcast.

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Radio Station WHMI 93.5 FM – News, Weather, Traffic, Sports, School Updates and the Best Classic Hits from Livingston County Michigan https://colinmarshallradio.com/radio-station-whmi-93-5-fm-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hits-from-livingston-county-michigan-4/ Wed, 09 Feb 2022 01:15:57 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/radio-station-whmi-93-5-fm-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hits-from-livingston-county-michigan-4/ Lucas Ninno/Getty Images (NEW YORK) — As the COVID-19 pandemic has swept the world, more than 5.7 million people have died from the disease worldwide, including more than 908,000 Americans, according to compiled real-time data. by the Center for Systems Science and Systems at Johns Hopkins University. Engineering. About 64.2% of the population in the […]]]>
Lucas Ninno/Getty Images

(NEW YORK) — As the COVID-19 pandemic has swept the world, more than 5.7 million people have died from the disease worldwide, including more than 908,000 Americans, according to compiled real-time data. by the Center for Systems Science and Systems at Johns Hopkins University. Engineering.

About 64.2% of the population in the United States is fully vaccinated against COVID-19, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Latest headlines:
-Daily cases below 300,000 for the 1st time this year
-Omicron is estimated at 96.4% of new cases
-Michigan closes bridge to Canada amid trucker-led protests
-Oregon will lift mask mandates for indoor public spaces and schools by March 31

Here’s how the news evolves. All times Eastern.

February 08, 7:32 p.m.
Boston mayor sets out guidelines to drop vaccine proof requirement

Boston Mayor Michelle Wu outlined plans to drop evidence of the city’s vaccine requirement at indoor businesses, including bars, movie theaters and restaurants.

The city must have fewer than 200 COVID-19 hospitalizations per day, 95% of intensive care beds must be free, and the community positivity rate must be below 5%, before the requirement is removed, he said. she stated.

“The quickest way to ensure that we ease pressure on hospital capacity and reduce community positivity is to continue filling the gaps with vaccination and boosters,” Wu said in a statement.

There are no immediate plans to end the city’s mask mandate in schools, she added.

ABC News’ Arielle Mitropoulos

February 08, 7:20 p.m.
LA County maintains mask mandate for schools

While California Governor Gavin Newsom announced on Monday that he would end the statewide mask mandate next week, Los Angeles County health officials said on Tuesday that they had no immediate plans to drop their mask mandate.

Los Angeles County Health Department Director Dr. Barbara Ferrer told reporters that the county’s decision will be made based on whether the number of hospitalizations drops or if the vaccination is approved for young people. children.

The mandate will be dropped when daily hospitalizations fall below 2,500 for seven consecutive days, according to Ferrer. Once that threshold is reached, “masking will no longer be required outdoors at outdoor mega events or in indoor outdoor spaces in day care centers and K-12 schools,” Ferrer said.

Even if this threshold is not met, the mandate could be abandoned eight weeks after the approval of vaccines for children under 5 years old. Pfizer has submitted an application to the Food and Drug Administration to have its vaccine approved for children 6 months to 5 years old. A hearing is scheduled for February 15.

Los Angeles County is the second largest school district in the nation, with over 600,000 students.

February 08, 1:53 p.m.
Daily cases below 300,000 for the first time this year

The U.S. case rate is down, down 63.4% since the peak three weeks ago, according to federal data.

For the first time since December, daily cases in the United States are below 300,000.

However, experts continue to warn that the United States is not off the hook. Case levels remain much higher than the country’s previous surges, and the United States is still reporting millions of new cases every week. Experts also point out that many Americans who take home tests do not submit their results and therefore the total number of cases may be higher than reported.

On average, about 13,000 Americans with COVID-19 are admitted to hospital each day — a drop of 26.4% in the past week, according to federal data.

Emergency room visits with diagnosed cases of COVID-19 are also down, down nearly 60% in the past month, according to federal data.

The U.S. mortality average is at a plateau, with the country reporting about 2,300 new COVID-19-related deaths every day, according to federal data. This average is significantly lower than last winter, when the country peaked at around 3,400 deaths per day.

ABC News’ Arielle Mitropoulos

February 08, 11:28 a.m.
Omicron is estimated at 96.4% of new cases

The presence of the omicron subvariant, BA.2, is increasing in the United States, according to new data released by the CDC.

BA.2 is estimated to account for 3.6% of new COVID-19 cases in the United States as of February 5. BA.2 is expected to represent 1.2% of new cases the previous week.

The original omicron strain, B.1.1.529, still makes up the vast majority of new cases, accounting for about 96.4% of cases in the United States.

There are still many unknowns about the BA.2 variant, but currently it does not appear to demonstrate more severe disease. There is also no indication that BA.2 will have any further impact on vaccine efficacy.

The delta variant, which accounted for 99.2% of all new cases just two months ago, is now estimated at 0% of new cases.

ABC News’ Arielle Mitropoulos, Eric M. Strauss

Copyright © 2022, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

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Radio Station WHMI 93.5 FM – News, Weather, Traffic, Sports, School Updates and the Best Classic Hits from Livingston County Michigan https://colinmarshallradio.com/radio-station-whmi-93-5-fm-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hits-from-livingston-county-michigan-3/ Mon, 07 Feb 2022 17:42:42 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/radio-station-whmi-93-5-fm-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hits-from-livingston-county-michigan-3/ Luis Alvarez/Getty Images (NEW YORK) — As the COVID-19 pandemic has swept the world, more than 5.7 million people have died from the disease worldwide, including more than 904,000 Americans, according to compiled real-time data. by the Center for Systems Science and Systems at Johns Hopkins University. Engineering. About 64.1% of the population in the […]]]>
Luis Alvarez/Getty Images

(NEW YORK) — As the COVID-19 pandemic has swept the world, more than 5.7 million people have died from the disease worldwide, including more than 904,000 Americans, according to compiled real-time data. by the Center for Systems Science and Systems at Johns Hopkins University. Engineering.

About 64.1% of the population in the United States is fully vaccinated against COVID-19, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Latest titles:
-Connecticut to end statewide school mask mandate
-New Jersey governor to end mask mandate for schools
-All states reporting declining or stable new case rates

Here’s how the news evolves. All times Eastern.

February 07, 4:56 p.m.
Cases in children continue to drop but are still ‘extremely high’

After the United States reported an unprecedented number of new pediatric COVID-19 infections last month, updated data released Monday shows new cases among children have fallen for the second consecutive week.

Nearly 632,000 children tested positive for COVID-19 last week, a huge drop from the record high of 1,150,000 reported the week ending Jan. 20, according to a new report from the American Academy of Pediatrics and of the Children’s Hospital Association.

However, the organizations warn that pediatric cases remain “extremely high” and are still double the level seen during the Delta’s summer surge.

The AAP and CHA noted that there is an “urgent” need to collect more age-specific data to assess disease severity related to new variants as well as potential longer-term effects.

ABC News’ Arielle Mitropoulos

February 07, 4:34 p.m.
Connecticut to end statewide school mask mandate

Connecticut Gov. Ned Lamont announced on Monday that he recommends ending the statewide mask mandate beginning Feb. 28.

Starting in March, the decision on masks in schools will rest with superintendents and mayors based on individual cities’ needs, he said.

It comes hours after New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy said his requirement to wear face masks in schools would end on March 7.

The CDC said it continues to recommend masks for all students 2 and older, regardless of their vaccination status.

February 07, 2:50 p.m.
The White House has contracted 569 million free tests so far

President Joe Biden’s administration has so far contracted for about 569 million rapid home tests as it works to fulfill Biden’s pledge for 1 billion free tests nationwide, has a White House official told ABC News.

According to an ABC News analysis, testing company iHealth is supplying the government with the most tests to meet this goal, with a contract to supply 354 million tests. Roche, Abbott and Siemens are other companies providing testing.

White House officials said about 60 million households have placed test orders so far, for a total of 240 million tests (each household can order four).

The U.S. Postal Service said on Friday it had mailed tests to “tens of millions” of those households.

ABC News’ Cheyenne Haslett, Ben Gittleson, Lucien Bruggeman

February 07, 11:54 a.m.
New Jersey governor to end mask mandate for schools

New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy announced on Monday that the state’s requirement to wear face masks in schools will end on March 7.

“Balancing public health with returning to some semblance of normalcy isn’t easy. But we can take this step responsibly due to declining COVID numbers and growth in vaccinations,” Murphy tweeted.

Murphy, a Democrat, has imposed some of the toughest pandemic-related mandates in the country. New Jersey, an early hotspot for COVID-19 cases, has lost more than 31,000 residents to the virus.

The move follows a move last month by Pennsylvania Governor Tom Wolf, also a Democrat, to rescind his state’s mask mandate for schools.

Meanwhile, Democratic governors in New York and Connecticut have said they are reassessing school mask mandates set to expire later this month.

ABC News’ Aaron Katersky

Copyright © 2022, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

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Illinois judge blocks school mask mandate, state appeals https://colinmarshallradio.com/illinois-judge-blocks-school-mask-mandate-state-appeals/ Sat, 05 Feb 2022 17:01:40 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/illinois-judge-blocks-school-mask-mandate-state-appeals/ SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (AP) — A central Illinois judge has issued a temporary restraining order that stops school districts across the state from requiring students to wear masks in classrooms, saying that Gov. JB Pritzker overstepped his legal authority with a mask mandate that angered many parents as well as teachers. In a ruling issued Friday […]]]>

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (AP) — A central Illinois judge has issued a temporary restraining order that stops school districts across the state from requiring students to wear masks in classrooms, saying that Gov. JB Pritzker overstepped his legal authority with a mask mandate that angered many parents as well as teachers.

In a ruling issued Friday in response to a lawsuit filed by a group of parents and teachers, Sangamon County Circuit Judge Raylene Grischow also determined that several other Pritzker emergency orders to combat the spread of COVID-19, including one issued last year that mandates vaccinations for school employees, are “null and void.”

“This court recognizes the tragic toll of the COVID-19 pandemic, not just in this state, but across the country and the world,” Grischow wrote in a ruling that affects 146 school districts in Illinois, including the Chicago Public School System. “Nevertheless, it is the duty of the courts to uphold the rule of law and to ensure that all branches of government act within the limits of the authority granted by the Constitution.”

Pritzker had harsh words for the judge’s decision and quickly urged the state’s attorney general’s office to appeal, suggesting the decision could spark a new outbreak of the virus and force schools to shut down and return to online classes.

“The serious consequence of this misguided decision is that schools in these districts no longer have sufficient tools to keep students and staff safe as COVID-19 continues to threaten our communities – and this may require schools to s ‘remove”, Pritzker said in a statement. “This shows once again that the mask mandate and school exclusion protocols are essential tools in keeping schools open and everyone safe.”

Attorney General Kwame Raoul agreed with Pritzker that the decision would make it harder to protect students and school employees from the virus, and said he would appeal.

“This decision sends the message that not all students have the same right to safely access schools and classrooms in Illinois, particularly if they have disabilities or other health conditions. “, Raoul said in a statement.

The ruling “prioritizes a relatively small group of plaintiffs who refuse to follow widely accepted science over the rights of other students, faculty and staff to enter schools without fear of contracting a virus that has claimed the life to more than 31,000 Illinois residents — or bring this virus home to their loved ones,” he said.

In her ruling, the judge agreed with parents and teachers who argued that only local health departments, not the governor or school districts, have the authority to require such measures. The judge also agreed with the parents who argued that the state cannot require districts to require staff members to be vaccinated or tested weekly “without first providing them with due process.” “.

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