executive director – Colin Marshall Radio http://colinmarshallradio.com/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 00:43:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://colinmarshallradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-1-1-120x120.png executive director – Colin Marshall Radio http://colinmarshallradio.com/ 32 32 Radio show hears inspiring stories from inspiring women https://colinmarshallradio.com/radio-show-hears-inspiring-stories-from-inspiring-women/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 00:43:41 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/radio-show-hears-inspiring-stories-from-inspiring-women/ Post views: 170 To mark International Women’s Day 2022 (Tuesday March 8), regular Open 4 Business presenter Adrian Pryce on NLive Radio left the ‘hot seat’ for an evening to make way for special guest host Dean from the Karen Jones School of Business and Law. Karen chose the kick tune – fellow countrywoman Dame […]]]>

Post views: 170

To mark International Women’s Day 2022 (Tuesday March 8), regular Open 4 Business presenter Adrian Pryce on NLive Radio left the ‘hot seat’ for an evening to make way for special guest host Dean from the Karen Jones School of Business and Law.

Karen chose the kick tune – fellow countrywoman Dame Shirley Bassey singing I Am What I Am – and her guests also chose their own, encapsulating how they feel as individual women in leadership roles.

The theme for International Women’s Day 2022 this year, the theme is Break the Bias and Karen was joined by four women who hold various roles across the city and county who spoke about their unique professional or academic journeys. They discussed the challenges they have faced, what inspires them and how, despite the huge progress made towards gender equality, there is still a long way to go.

Colleen Rattigan, Northamptonshire Police Chief of Staff spoke about her strategic role which is at the executive level in the police force and her journey to this senior role from a varied background, including public health and as an early childhood practitioner. She adds that Northamptonshire Police have done and continue to do a lot to address gender-related workplace challenges.

After Colleen was Rufia Ashraf, Northampton’s first ever female Mayor in Northampton a role historically generally held by men. She spoke of her work with communities and individuals as Northampton’s ‘first citizen’ and how meeting people inspires her. She added that being a woman brings new and different qualities that help elevate the role.

Morcea Walker – who is from Jamaica and came to the UK aged nine – explained how she dealt with racism when she arrived and the marginal roles black women had at that time. Morcea takes listeners on his very personal journey through an interesting career, his passion for community and family work.

The last guest was the University’s own Becky Bradshaw, Executive Director of Estates and Campus Services. She spoke about her role in integrating the University into the community, how her work is not just about bricks and mortar, and how the professional world is more accommodating and respectful of professional women.

Listen to the full chat again here.

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Colorado Inmates Begin Broadcasting on America’s First Statewide Prison Radio Station – The Burlington Record https://colinmarshallradio.com/colorado-inmates-begin-broadcasting-on-americas-first-statewide-prison-radio-station-the-burlington-record/ Sat, 05 Mar 2022 12:56:15 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/colorado-inmates-begin-broadcasting-on-americas-first-statewide-prison-radio-station-the-burlington-record/ LIMON — Audio producers and on-air talent crammed into the makeshift studio on Tuesday, adjusting levels and donning headphones as they prepared to launch Colorado’s new radio station. “Launch Day!” shouted a producer as the staff cowered in front of the microphones, a palpable hum permeating the windowless room. Large white posters hung on a […]]]>

LIMON — Audio producers and on-air talent crammed into the makeshift studio on Tuesday, adjusting levels and donning headphones as they prepared to launch Colorado’s new radio station.

“Launch Day!” shouted a producer as the staff cowered in front of the microphones, a palpable hum permeating the windowless room. Large white posters hung on a nearby wall detailing the new station’s mission, values ​​and impacts.

“In an artistic space”, said a poster, “there are no failures”.

It’s not Colorado Public Radio or Hits 95.7. This is Limon Correctional Facility, a sprawling Level IV prison in the Eastern Plains of Colorado that houses more than 700 inmates behind a 4,000 foot long double perimeter fence.

Inside plexiglass walls, surrounded by soundproof foam, a collection of giddy men in green jumpsuits presented Inside Wire: Colorado Prison Radio, the first state-run radio station in U.S. history on Tuesday. be recorded and produced inside prison walls and transmitted to anyone with an internet connection anywhere in the world.

“Returning to the community makes us worth again as human beings,” said Anthony Quintana, 51, who has spent the past 33 years behind bars for murder but has been invigorated by his new role as engineer and director of operations for the burgeoning radio station.

Inside Wire, the first statewide prison radio station, launched on March 1, 2022 inside the Limon Correctional Facility.

The program’s goal is to change the narrative of the more than 14,000 people housed in Colorado prisons.

“It’s a truly monumental moment,” Ashley Hamilton, executive director and co-founder of the University of Denver’s Prison Arts Initiative, told the audience.

The idea had been in the making for a year and a half, born in the depths of the COVID-19 pandemic. In November 2020, DU and the Department of Corrections launched A/LIVE Inside, a virtual showcase for incarcerated artists and storytellers to share their work from Colorado prisons. Program staff realized they could use the closed-circuit system inside the prisons to broadcast the event.

“We thought, ‘What else could we do? ‘” Hamilton said. She pitched the idea to Dean Williams, executive director of the Colorado Department of Corrections.

The head of the state’s corrections system took office in 2019 with a reform-minded vision, promising to “normalize” life behind bars. Williams green-lit a podcast recorded in Colorado prisons, as well as an inmate-run newspaper and a touring production of “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.”

Colorado Prison Radio, Williams told the Denver Post, is a continuation of that normalization movement.

“It’s about making prison more human,” Williams said after taping.

Limon Correctional Facility inmate Anthony Quintana...
Limon Correctional Facility inmate Anthony Quintana, who has been in prison for 33 years, now works at the prison’s first statewide radio station as the station’s engineer and manager. of operations on March 1, 2022. Quintana hung family photos and other decorations on the wall where he works at the prison radio station, called Inside Wire.

The executive director appeared on Tuesday’s kickoff show and plans to appear on a weekly show called ‘Up to the Minute with Dean Williams’, in which incarcerated residents will talk to him about anything and everything.

The station, funded by the DU Prison Arts Initiative, operates 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and includes musical programs, conversations between inmates and correctional staff, and an audio message board for Department residents. correctional services.

The station is not actually broadcast on AM or FM radio, but can be streamed online or through the Inside Wire app. It is also broadcast to every cell in Colorado’s 21 correctional facilities via closed-circuit televisions.

Jody Aguirre, 58, had never played with audio until he signed on as Inside Wire’s engagement producer and host of a Tuesday morning music show.

He first went to prison in 1994 for murder and served a stint in solitary confinement. There is no release date on the horizon.

“When you come here you lose hope,” Aguirre said.

But after spending 10 years angry and bitter, Aguirre made a promise to his mother: “I will live to make her proud.”

He took a creative writing course, and now he mixes 80s new wave, deep house and jazz on his Tuesday radio show.

“People here live honorable lives,” Aguirre said.

Inmate Herbert Alexander, who was...
Inmate Herbert Alexander, pictured at Limon Correctional Facility on March 1, 2022, is the production manager for a new prison radio station. Alexander took a moment outside the sound booth before heading back inside to help the station, called Inside Wire, kick off its opening schedule.

Herbert Alexander, 46, can’t stop talking to his family outside the new radio station.

The rumor mill inside the prison is strong, he said. So Alexander, who is the production manager of Inside Wire, is particularly excited about the show with Williams to give residents real information about new legislation or policies that affect them on a daily basis.

“A lot of guys don’t know about this information,” Alexander said. “We’re giving you Dean’s voice.”

Alexander has been incarcerated for 13 years for aggravated robbery and is eligible for parole within the next two years. He hopes to use his DU certificate in audio production to find work in this field once back outside.

“Most offenders go home at some point,” Alexander said outside the studio. “So when they do, don’t we want them to be better men?”

The incarcerated men gathered in a room after the show was taped on Tuesday, waving and shouting via video to their fellow radio hosts inside the Sterling Correctional Facility and the Denver Women’s Correctional Facility, where broadcasts will also be recorded and produced. (All shows are pre-recorded and reviewed before they hit the airwaves, though Hamilton says they didn’t have to remove content from any of the taped shows before this week’s debut.)

As he watched from the back of the room, Seth Ready became emotional. This project is personal to Ready, who spent 18 years behind bars but now works for the DU Prison Arts Initiative as a communications associate.

Darrius Turner, an inmate at Limon Correctional Facility,...
Limon Correctional Facility inmate Darrius Turner works at the Inside Wire radio station from inside the prison on March 1, 2022.

“It’s been one of the best days of my life,” he told the men and women on the video call.

Finally, it was time to hear the final product, the culmination of a year of work.

The intro music came on the computer and Quintana couldn’t help but giggle as she took a bite of her fruit salad. Cheers filled the prison library. Quintana waved her fist, smiling broadly. Hamilton let out a deep exhaled sigh.

Alexandre’s voice swept over the airwaves: “We have a vision: To create something by us, for us.

Quintana shouted, “That’s the hook!” as he sang on the chorus: “Inside…inside…the wire!”

Alexandre soaks up the moment.

“Knowing that everyone can hear it,” he said afterward, “is like, wow.”

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Colorado inmates launch first US statewide prison radio station https://colinmarshallradio.com/colorado-inmates-launch-first-us-statewide-prison-radio-station/ Fri, 04 Mar 2022 01:06:47 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/colorado-inmates-launch-first-us-statewide-prison-radio-station/ LIMON — Audio producers and on-air talent crammed into the makeshift studio on Tuesday, adjusting levels and donning headphones as they prepared to launch the new Colorado radio station. “Launch Day!” shouted a producer as the staff cowered in front of the microphones, a palpable hum permeating the windowless room. Large white posters hung on […]]]>

LIMON — Audio producers and on-air talent crammed into the makeshift studio on Tuesday, adjusting levels and donning headphones as they prepared to launch the new Colorado radio station.

“Launch Day!” shouted a producer as the staff cowered in front of the microphones, a palpable hum permeating the windowless room. Large white posters hung on a nearby wall detailing the new station’s mission, values ​​and impacts.

“In an artistic space”, said a poster, “there are no failures”.

It’s not Colorado Public Radio or Hits 95.7. This is Limon Correctional Facility, a sprawling Level IV prison in the Eastern Plains of Colorado that houses more than 700 inmates behind a 4,000 foot long double perimeter fence.

Inside plexiglass walls, surrounded by soundproof foam, a collection of giddy men in green jumpsuits presented Inside Wire: Colorado Prison Radio, the first state-run radio station in U.S. history on Tuesday. be recorded and produced inside prison walls and transmitted to anyone with an Internet connection anywhere in the world.

“Returning to the community makes us worth again as human beings,” said Anthony Quintana, 51, who has spent the past 33 years behind bars for murder but has been invigorated by his new role as engineer and director of operations for the burgeoning radio station.

Inside Wire, the first statewide prison radio station, launched on March 1, 2022 inside the Limon Correctional Facility.

The program’s goal is to change the narrative of the more than 14,000 people housed in Colorado prisons.

“It’s a truly monumental moment,” Ashley Hamilton, executive director and co-founder of the University of Denver’s Prison Arts Initiative, told the audience.

The idea had been in the making for a year and a half, born in the depths of the COVID-19 pandemic. In November 2020, DU and the Department of Corrections launched A/LIVE Inside, a virtual showcase for incarcerated artists and storytellers to share their work from Colorado prisons. Program staff realized they could use the closed-circuit system inside the prisons to broadcast the event.

“We thought, ‘What else could we do? ‘” Hamilton said. She pitched the idea to Dean Williams, executive director of the Colorado Department of Corrections.

The head of the state’s corrections system took office in 2019 with a reform-minded vision, promising to “normalize” life behind bars. Williams green-lit a podcast recorded in Colorado prisons, as well as an inmate-run newspaper and a touring production of “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.”

Colorado Prison Radio, Williams told the Denver Post, is a continuation of that normalization movement.

“It’s about making prison more human,” Williams said after taping.

Limon Correctional Facility inmate Anthony Quintana...
Limon Correctional Facility inmate Anthony Quintana, who has been in prison for 33 years, now works at the prison’s first statewide radio station as the station’s engineer and manager. of operations on March 1, 2022. Quintana hung family photos and other decorations on the wall where he works at the prison radio station, called Inside Wire.

The executive director appeared on Tuesday’s kickoff show and plans to appear on a weekly show called ‘Up to the Minute with Dean Williams’, in which incarcerated residents will talk to him about anything and everything.

The station, funded by the DU Prison Arts Initiative, operates 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and includes musical programs, conversations between inmates and correctional staff, and an audio message board for Department residents. correctional services.

The station is not actually broadcast on AM or FM radio, but can be streamed online or through the Inside Wire app. It is also broadcast to every cell in Colorado’s 21 correctional facilities via closed-circuit televisions.

Jody Aguirre, 58, had never played with audio until he signed on as Inside Wire’s engagement producer and host of a Tuesday morning music show.

He first went to prison in 1994 for murder and served a stint in solitary confinement. There is no release date on the horizon.

“When you come here you lose hope,” Aguirre said.

But after spending 10 years angry and bitter, Aguirre made a promise to his mother: “I will live to make her proud.”

He took a creative writing course, and now he mixes 80s new wave, deep house and jazz on his Tuesday radio show.

“People here live honorable lives,” Aguirre said.

Inmate Herbert Alexander, who was...
Inmate Herbert Alexander, pictured at Limon Correctional Facility on March 1, 2022, is the production manager for a new prison radio station. Alexander took a moment outside the sound booth before heading back inside to help the station, called Inside Wire, kick off its opening schedule.

Herbert Alexander, 46, can’t stop talking to his family outside the new radio station.

The rumor mill inside the prison is strong, he said. So Alexander, who is the production manager of Inside Wire, is particularly excited about the show with Williams to give residents real information about new legislation or policies that affect them on a daily basis.

“A lot of guys don’t know about this information,” Alexander said. “We’re giving you Dean’s voice.”

Alexander has been incarcerated for 13 years for aggravated robbery and is eligible for parole within the next two years. He hopes to use his DU certificate in audio production to find work in this field once back outside.

“Most offenders go home at some point,” Alexander said outside the studio. “So when they do, don’t we want them to be better men?”

The incarcerated men gathered in a room after the show was taped on Tuesday, waving and shouting via video to their fellow radio hosts inside Sterling Correctional Facility and the Denver Women’s Correctional Facility, where broadcasts will also be recorded and produced. (All shows are pre-recorded and reviewed before they hit the airwaves, though Hamilton says they didn’t have to remove content from any of the taped shows before this week’s debut.)

As he watched from the back of the room, Seth Ready became emotional. This project is personal to Ready, who spent 18 years behind bars but now works for the DU Prison Arts Initiative as a communications associate.

Darrius Turner, an inmate at Limon Correctional Facility,...
Limon Correctional Facility inmate Darrius Turner works at the Inside Wire radio station from inside the prison on March 1, 2022.

“It’s been one of the best days of my life,” he told the men and women on the video call.

Finally, it was time to hear the final product, the culmination of a year of work.

The intro music came on the computer and Quintana couldn’t help but laugh as she took a bite of her fruit salad. Cheers filled the prison library. Quintana waved her fist, smiling broadly. Hamilton let out a deep exhaled sigh.

Alexandre’s voice swept over the airwaves: “We have a vision: To create something by us, for us.

Quintana shouted, “That’s the hook!” as he sang on the chorus: “Inside…inside…the wire!”

Alexandre soaks up the moment.

“Knowing that everyone can hear it,” he said afterward, “is like, wow.”

]]>
Colorado’s first prison internet radio show airs behind bars https://colinmarshallradio.com/colorados-first-prison-internet-radio-show-airs-behind-bars/ Wed, 02 Mar 2022 11:55:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/colorados-first-prison-internet-radio-show-airs-behind-bars/ Wearing a forest green jumpsuit and chunky headphones over his ears, Anthony Quintana leans into the microphone and greets listeners to Colorado’s first state prison internet radio station. He has been behind bars for 33 years, isolated from his family and the outside world, but today his voice can reach most cells in the Colorado […]]]>

Wearing a forest green jumpsuit and chunky headphones over his ears, Anthony Quintana leans into the microphone and greets listeners to Colorado’s first state prison internet radio station.

He has been behind bars for 33 years, isolated from his family and the outside world, but today his voice can reach most cells in the Colorado state prison system. He is one of 15 inmates from three Colorado facilities behind Inside Wire, which launched Tuesday via coloradoprisonradio.com.

The station will not air live, but its incarcerated producers take inspiration from radio DJs, providing music and commentary to break up the monotony of prison life and give new perspectives to those behind bars.

And while other prisons have offered low-power prison radio programs — available to those who live near prisons — Colorado’s online station allows producers from the three participating prison studios to be heard in n’ any facility in the state, where inmates can tune in through the prison televisions.

The soundproof walls of Limon Correctional Facility’s recording studio provide a stark contrast to the concrete cells of the Level 4 prison, which houses medium to high risk inmates. Inside the recording studio, housed in a wing reserved for educational programs, interview tips are posted on the wall and audio production instructions are scribbled on a whiteboard. A “Billboard Book of Top 40 Hits” sits on the desk next to an audio switchboard.

For Quintana, or DJ Q-VO as he calls himself on air, the show is an opportunity to fight the stigma of prison life.

“I took the life of a man and not a day goes by and everything I do without acknowledging it,” said Quintana, engineer and director of operations for the program. “I want people to know that there really are people changing here.”

“Transforming prisons into places of humanity”

Inside Wire, a collaboration between the Colorado Department of Corrections and the University of Denver’s Prison Arts Initiative, is produced by people incarcerated at Limon Correctional Facility, Sterling Correctional Facility, and Denver Women’s Correctional Facility.

“It is one more stake in our mission to transform prisons into a place of humanity, to have a purpose, an intentionality and to bring men and women behind the walls not only in this mission, but for that they’re leading the mission to make prisons more intentional,” Dean Williams, executive director of the Colorado Department of Corrections, told the Colorado Sun.

He called Inside Wire part of the journey to “make prisons more intentional and human.”

Inmates, Darrius Turner (left) and Anthony Quintana (center) speak with Colorado Department of Corrections Executive Director Dean Williams for Inside Wire at Limon Correctional Facility, Limon, Colorado, Tuesday, March 1, 2022. (Parker Seibold, special for the Colorado Sun)

He hopes the program will help change the prison culture to become more goal-oriented and help share the stories of incarcerated men and women.

“So when these men and women lead, it not only changes them, but it changes us and how we respond,” he said.

Inside Wire producers will produce a variety of segments, including weekly conversations with Williams on a program called “Up to the Minute with Dean Williams.”

There are no restrictions on what inmates can request, although they must be respectful and intentional in their requests, he said.

“I expect them to not just be fluff or softballs all the time,” Williams said. “The only thing I said was that whatever you ask should be done with dignity and respect.”

Inside Wire’s lineup is diverse, with music from all genres, from country to hip-hop. Instead of commercials, the producers record short public service announcements, ranging from health and fitness tips to promotional clips for Inside Wire.

Segments will include the “With (In)” podcast, another collaboration between DU and CDOC, which aims to change the conversation about who is in prison. On Friday nights, “One Tune” will air, which leaves guests wondering: If you were stranded on an island or in space and could take one song with you, which one would it be and why?

Darrius Turner, Music Director and Producer of Inside Wire at Limon Correctional Facility, adjusts levels on a soundboard as he produces the show ahead of its launch Tuesday, March 1, 2022. (Parker Seibold, Special to The Colorado Sun)

A way to go beyond their past

Beyond Prison Walls, the program is intended to help provide listeners with a new perspective on what prison culture is all about and offers prisoners a new way to move beyond their past into a brighter future. positive, said Ryan Conarro, staff member of DU’s Prison Arts Initiative. and program director and general manager of Inside Wire.

“Many of the people I work with inside prisons are here because they have done wrong and they are separated from society because of it and they are working on healing and redemption. . If we continue to have what has traditionally been there, which is a space of great isolation and a sense of lack of connection, that redemption and healing is much less likely to occur. … I think telling stories, listening to each other and sharing those stories is fundamental,” Conarro said.

After the segments are recorded, they are reviewed by the producers at Inside Wire, then by Conarro, and finally by CDOC staff. So far, hundreds of hours of content have been created, but none have been reported.

“We agreed that the content we share, the stories and voices we share, always want to go in the direction of shared healing and mutual understanding. So, from the songs on our playlist to the personal stories we amplify inside the installations, we want them to embody that,” Conarro said.

But the contents aren’t meant to be “sugar coated,” he said.

“It’s not meant to be a little sliver of reality. We want to open the minds and eyes of listeners to what prison life is like and who is here, and amplify the stories that complicate a sort of one-dimensional view of who is incarcerated in there,” he said. declared.

Ryan Conarro, Managing Director and Director of Programs at Inside Wire, is joined by the team of inmates at Simon Correctional Facility who created the radio station, as he talks about the program ahead of its launch on Tuesday, March 1, 2022. (Parker Seibold, special for the Colorado Sun)

At 11 a.m. Tuesday, the six incarcerated producers at Limon Correctional Center gathered inside the prison library to listen to the launch of the show which also aired on television to the cells of thousands of other inmates across the state.

“10, 9, 8, 7,” the producers count down the air before the sound of a rocket explodes. “Ladies and gentlemen, Inside Wire Colorado Prison Radio is about to connect to every prison in Colorado, and beyond.”

Darrius Turner, the programme’s musical director, said it was important to be part of the program which he hopes shows his personal growth since his incarceration in 2009.

“Being with this group of guys to accomplish something that’s bigger than us and passing that on to the next generation to give them positive tools, that’s what made it really surreal to be a part of this,” Turner said. .

His mother, three children and girlfriend will listen to the kickoff broadcast, along with his sister who said she would play it on the PA system of a dry cleaner in Florida, where she works.

Benny Hill was sentenced to life without parole, but he hopes the program will help other inmates before they reenter society to find validation, find value and learn to deal with the issues that brought them down. in jail, he said.

Benny Hill, inmate at Limon Correctional Facility and director and feature film producer for Inside Wire poses for a portrait in a classroom at Limon Correctional Facility, in Limon, Colorado on Tuesday, March 1, 2022. ( Parker Seibold, Special for the Colorado Sun)

“There are a lot of good people here who are under the shadow of a lot of terrible things: addictions, violence, hate, anger,” he said. “And prison can fix that in a way, not just by putting band-aids on things, but fix it in a way that will end up changing a person for the better.”

Some people will be released, and when they do, Hill hopes prison programs, like InsideWire, will give them the tools to contribute to society in a positive way.

“Because when he comes out and becomes a father, and becomes a husband, boyfriend, son, and then finally, I’d like to see that person be the best they can be.”

Inside Wire is also available on the Inside Wire app.


We believe vital information should be seen by those affected, whether it is a public health crisis, investigative reporting, or holding lawmakers accountable. This report depends on the support of readers like you.

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Why is Black History Month important? https://colinmarshallradio.com/why-is-black-history-month-important/ Sat, 26 Feb 2022 12:54:56 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/why-is-black-history-month-important/ About 10 years ago, Shukree Hassan Tilghman tried to cancel Black History Month. Equipped with a sandwich board with the words “End of Black History Month” written across the front, he scoured the streets of New York City looking for people to sign his petition to eliminate him. To understand what Tilghman was doing, it […]]]>

About 10 years ago, Shukree Hassan Tilghman tried to cancel Black History Month.

Equipped with a sandwich board with the words “End of Black History Month” written across the front, he scoured the streets of New York City looking for people to sign his petition to eliminate him.

To understand what Tilghman was doing, it helps to know that the other side of his sign said “Black history is American history.” It also helps to know that he was filming all of this for a documentary he did,”More than a monthThis film explored an ongoing question about Black History Month; rather than highlighting the accomplishments of African Americans, does it instead maintain a segregated history of America?

“Some people think it was a stunt,” says Tilghman. In some ways it was, but it was also authentic.

Tilghman says the “main impetus” for her petition to end Black History Month was rooted in her childhood. Both of her parents were teachers, and those posters of famous black people that appeared on classroom walls and in school hallways every February were in her home year-round. When he was little, Black History Month was exciting, but since he heard the same stories of a few sanitized heroes repeating themselves one month a year, it started to feel insulting. “We were invisible for 11 months of the year, but now suddenly we were visible in February,” he says.

“What did it mean that we had Black History Month,” he began to wonder.

“And what would that mean if we didn’t?”

Why did Carter G. Woodson invent it?

Talk to any group of historians about the significance of Black History Month and they will all mention the same name: Carter G. Woodson.

“We call him the father of black history,” says Diana Ramey Berry, chair of the history department at the University of Texas at Austin.

In 1926 Woodson founded Negro History Week – which would become what we now call black history month.

“The idea was to make resources available for teachers — black teachers — to celebrate and talk about the contributions that black people had made to America,” says Karsonya Wise Whitehead, founding executive director of the Karson Institute for Race, Peace, and Social Justice at Loyola University. Whitehead is also a former secretary of ASALH – the Association for the Study of African American Life and History, which Woodson founded in 1915.

Woodson chose the week in February marked by the birth of Abraham Lincoln and the chosen birthday of Frederick Douglass, as those days were celebrated in his community. In this way, Woodson built on a black tradition that already commemorated the past.

“He also understood that for black students to see themselves beyond where they are now, they needed to be able to learn more about the contributions their ancestors had made to this country,” Whitehead said.

The historical context of the moment is also key, according to Berry. “African Americans were about 50 years out of slavery trying to find their place in the United States,” she says.

This space was violently demarcated by white supremacy. “We were living through segregation, lynchings, mass murders and massacres,” Berry says. A few years ago it was the so-called 1919 red summer, when white mobs attacked black neighborhoods and towns. Then in 1921 came the Tulsa Race Massacre.

Along with white supremacist violence was an attempt to whitewash US history, excluding both the contributions and realities of black people. It was the time when statues of Confederate soldiers were erected and the myth of the lost cause – the lie that the Civil War was about preserving a distinguished way of life and that slaves were treated well – became a dominant narrative. “Not just in the South,” says Hasan Kwame Jeffries, a history professor at Ohio State University.

“A complete revision and distortion of the Civil War, slavery, emancipation, reconstruction was deeply embedded in the American public education system,” he adds.

“Let’s Talk About Blacks”

Growing up in New York public schools in the 1980s, Jeffries says Black History Month was a lot like “let’s talk about black people for a few days.”

“It was the usual cast of characters,” he says. Martin Luther King Jr., Frederick Douglass, Harriet Tubman, a few black inventors – “and then we’d move on.”

Said Whitehead, “At school, all of a sudden it all turned black, didn’t it?”

“So you put your macaroni and cheese and your collard greens in the cafeteria. You line the halls with all this black art that would then be taken down at the end of February,” she says.

Black History Month can sometimes seem symbolic, but it’s still necessary, says Whitehead. “You can go to places,” she says, spouting the names of states, “where if you didn’t have Black History Month, there wouldn’t be any conversation.”

What we need is an inclusive and accurate American history, according to Berry. But American history remains a segregated space. “When you take American history classes, a lot of those classes are taught from the perspective of only Americans and white students,” Berry says.

The paradox of Black History Month today, says Whitehead, is that we still need it, even if it’s not enough. “We want black history to be American history,” she says. “But we understand that without Black History Month, they won’t teach it in the American history curriculum.”

Which brings us back to Tilghman and an answer to his question: what would it mean if we didn’t have Black History Month?

“If, but for Black History Month, those stories wouldn’t be told,” Tilghman says, “then we have a bigger problem that isn’t Black History Month. isn’t really a reason to maintain Black History Month.”

“It’s a reason to fight for something better than Black History Month.”

Parallels to Woodson’s time

There have been efforts in some states, and in some programs to integrate American history throughout the year, progressing slowly. But Hasan Jeffries says the moment we find ourselves in right now parallels perfectly the period in which Carter G. Woodson founded Negro History Week and January 6th. Once again, at the center of it all is a battle over who controls history.

“We see the same pushback now with these divisive topics and these divisive issues,” Jeffries says, referring to ““divisiveness” laws in Republican-led states that forbid acknowledging that America was founded on racist principles.

“If we can just take Rosa Parks out sitting on a bus and put her back on the bus without talking about it, that’s fine,” Jeffries says. “But we don’t want to talk about the society as a whole that supported and embraced Jim Crow. And how inequality is literally written into the American constitution.”

Integrating black history into American history is not a simple act of inclusion, says Jeffries. You can’t just insert black people who have invented things or made notable contributions into a timeline, he says.

“You start to have to question what you assume to be fundamental truths about the American experience, the myth of perpetual progress and American exceptionalism – it all comes crashing down,” says Jeffries.

But change is coming, he notes.

The undergraduates Jeffries teaches don’t necessarily start out with a complete understanding of United States history, but many now show up in his class precisely because they feel they haven’t been told everything. the story.

“They’ve seen all of this happen over the last four or five years – the rise of racism, white supremacy and hate,” he says of some of his white students. “And they come to college saying, okay, something’s wrong.”

Feed the appetite for a solid story

This thirst for black history, for robust American history, is something high school teacher Ernest Crim III has tapped into on social media. His tiktok videos about black characters in history have gone viral, racking up tens of thousands of views. One of these the videos were about Carter G. Woodsonand the origins of Black History Month.

Crim is a black teacher who teaches black, Latino, and white students in a Chicago suburb, which means he’s in many ways like the teachers Woodson created to serve Black History Week. “Woodson created Negro History Week for a particular purpose,” Crim explains. “So we could get together and discuss what we’ve been doing all year, not celebrate it for a week, which eventually turned into a month.”

That’s why in Crim’s history class, February isn’t the only time they talk about people of color. “In each unit of study, I look for examples of what black people and Latinos were doing at that time,” he says.

“We’ll get to my class’s civil rights unit, probably in March,” he says. “They’re going to think it’s February, with all that we’re talking about black people.”

For Crim, in teaching history, separate is not equal.

Illinois, where he teaches, has no divisiveness law, but even without an outright ban, he says many of his students don’t learn anything about systemic racism in American history. “Even though not every state bans it, it’s not necessary because most history teachers don’t do it at all,” Crim says. You don’t need to ban something that isn’t really taught in the first place.

Teaching history, teaching integrated honest history, can be transformative, says Crim. “It’s about changing your thoughts and it can change your whole generation. It can change your family. It might change, just the trajectory of your whole life,” he says.

“The story that we as Americans tell about who we were, that story tells us who we are,” says Shukree Tilghman.

Tilghman’s campaign to end Black History Month left him with a renewed respect for the rich history of the month itself. In recent years, it may seem like history has resurfaced as a battleground for American identity, but it has always been that way. “History is about power,” says Tilghman, “and who has the power to tell the story.”

Black History Month, at its best, has the ability to open the door to some sort of narrative repairs, says Hasan Jeffries. “I mean, that’s part of the power of Black History Month. It holds America accountable for the narrative it tells about the past.”

Copyright 2022 NPR. To learn more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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The public radio show and podcast “Selected Shorts” gets the first permanent host in a decade. | story https://colinmarshallradio.com/the-public-radio-show-and-podcast-selected-shorts-gets-the-first-permanent-host-in-a-decade-story/ Thu, 24 Feb 2022 19:15:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/the-public-radio-show-and-podcast-selected-shorts-gets-the-first-permanent-host-in-a-decade-story/ Selected Shorts has a new host. The public radio and podcast series, created by Symphony Space, tapped author Meg Wolitzer to become the show’s first permanent host since the death of Symphony Space founder Isaiah Sheffer in 2012. After a decade of writers and artists serving as host of events on the show, those duties […]]]>

Selected Shorts has a new host. The public radio and podcast series, created by Symphony Space, tapped author Meg Wolitzer to become the show’s first permanent host since the death of Symphony Space founder Isaiah Sheffer in 2012. After a decade of writers and artists serving as host of events on the show, those duties will fall to Wolitzer, whose own stories have been interpreted on the show. She has written bestsellers such as “The Wife”, “The Interestings” and “The Female Persuasion”.

“We are thrilled to welcome Meg as the new host of Shorts selectedsaid Kathy Landau, executive director of Symphony Space in the announcement. “She brings deep connections to the show and the world she celebrates, explores and unpacks. Meg’s intelligence, passion and warmth will infuse our radio show and podcast with a new spirit and serve as an invitation open to our listeners to join us and to the conversation sparked by the powerful combination of short stories and extraordinary actors.

Selected Shorts offers a range of content from literature, film, theater and comedy. Episodes hosted by Wolitzer will debut in March. New podcast episodes are released every Thursday.

Wolitzer says she has long been an avid Selected Shorts listener and has had her own stories performed for the series by actors Blythe Danner and Jill Eikenberry.

“I think stories are like a stock cube of life, it’s a little concentrate of what’s going on in the world. And by listening to stories and reading them, you understand the world better. I don’t know what I would do without this kind of work,” Wolitzer said. “[Selected Shorts] unlike anything else I’ve heard before. The idea of ​​talking to actors and writers and listening to these stories and being a part of them is exciting to me. The actors bring something to it that you can’t necessarily hear when you say it in your head, and this marriage of actors and writers was made in heaven for me.

Selected Shorts was born in Symphony Space in 1985 and launched the performance literature genre, soon spawning the weekly radio show, heard on public radio stations nationwide and on the podcast.

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The public radio show and podcast “Selected Shorts” gets the first permanent host in a decade. | Daily News Podcast https://colinmarshallradio.com/the-public-radio-show-and-podcast-selected-shorts-gets-the-first-permanent-host-in-a-decade-daily-news-podcast/ Tue, 22 Feb 2022 16:40:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/the-public-radio-show-and-podcast-selected-shorts-gets-the-first-permanent-host-in-a-decade-daily-news-podcast/ Selected Shorts has a new host. The public radio and podcast series, created by Symphony Space, tapped author Meg Wolitzer to become the show’s first permanent host since the death of Symphony Space founder Isaiah Sheffer in 2012. After a decade of writers and artists serving as host of events on the show, those duties […]]]>

Selected Shorts has a new host. The public radio and podcast series, created by Symphony Space, tapped author Meg Wolitzer to become the show’s first permanent host since the death of Symphony Space founder Isaiah Sheffer in 2012. After a decade of writers and artists serving as host of events on the show, those duties will fall to Wolitzer, whose own stories have been interpreted on the show. She has written bestsellers such as “The Wife”, “The Interestings” and “The Female Persuasion”.

“We are thrilled to welcome Meg as the new host of Shorts selectedsaid Kathy Landau, executive director of Symphony Space in the announcement. “She brings deep connections to the show and the world she celebrates, explores and unpacks. Meg’s intelligence, passion and warmth will infuse our radio show and podcast with a new spirit and serve as an invitation open to our listeners to join us and to the conversation sparked by the powerful combination of short stories and extraordinary actors.

Selected Shorts offers a range of content from literature, film, theater and comedy. Episodes hosted by Wolitzer will debut in March. New podcast episodes are released every Thursday.

Wolitzer says she has long been an avid Selected Shorts listener and has had her own stories performed for the series by actors Blythe Danner and Jill Eikenberry.

“I think stories are like a stock cube of life, it’s a little concentrate of what’s going on in the world. And by listening to stories and reading them, you understand the world better. I don’t know what I would do without this kind of work,” Wolitzer said. “[Selected Shorts] unlike anything else I’ve heard before. The idea of ​​talking to actors and writers and listening to these stories and being a part of them is exciting to me. The actors bring something to it that you can’t necessarily hear when you say it in your head, and this marriage of actors and writers was made in heaven for me.

In addition to a new host, a book called “Small Odysseys: Selected Shorts Presents 35 New Stories” will also be released next month. The news was commissioned by Symphony Space and will be featured in a free live event scheduled for March 26 in New York City.

Selected Shorts was born in Symphony Space in 1985 and launched the performance literature genre, soon spawning the weekly radio show, heard on public radio stations nationwide and on the podcast.

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