getty images – Colin Marshall Radio http://colinmarshallradio.com/ Fri, 25 Mar 2022 14:18:01 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://colinmarshallradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-1-1-120x120.png getty images – Colin Marshall Radio http://colinmarshallradio.com/ 32 32 Nurses’ union denounces call for return to work https://colinmarshallradio.com/nurses-union-denounces-call-for-return-to-work/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 02:14:55 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/nurses-union-denounces-call-for-return-to-work/ Photo: Getty Images. Pierre Veschaffelt Kerri Nuku: Nurses’ union denounces call for return to work The organization of nurses is turned upside down. Covid-positive nurses are being asked to return to work. New guidance from the Ministry of Health indicates that non-symptomatic Covid-positive workers can return to work without self-isolating if a service is at […]]]>

Photo: Getty Images.

Pierre Veschaffelt

Kerri Nuku: Nurses’ union denounces call for return to work

The organization of nurses is turned upside down. Covid-positive nurses are being asked to return to work.

New guidance from the Ministry of Health indicates that non-symptomatic Covid-positive workers can return to work without self-isolating if a service is at risk of being significantly compromised due to a shortage of staff.

They can return to work on the sixth day after returning a negative RAT, or work in wards where all patients had Covid.

Union kaiwhakahaere Kerri Nuku says the order creates an unacceptable risk to the public and to an already exhausted and fatigued healthcare workforce.

“This whole dilemma is chaotic. We need to make sure that as we rise during this time there are difficult conversations that need to take place as we cannot continue to change health orders to respond to a crisis that this government and previous governments have chosen to address. ‘ignore,’ she said. said.

Kerri Nuku says one in five nurses is currently off work.


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Ryan Seacrest reunites with ex Julianne Hough on his radio show as former couple discuss ‘awkwardness’ between them https://colinmarshallradio.com/ryan-seacrest-reunites-with-ex-julianne-hough-on-his-radio-show-as-former-couple-discuss-awkwardness-between-them/ Sat, 05 Mar 2022 08:49:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/ryan-seacrest-reunites-with-ex-julianne-hough-on-his-radio-show-as-former-couple-discuss-awkwardness-between-them/ AMERICAN Idol host Ryan Seacrest addressed the “awkwardness” suggestion with ex Julianne Hough as the dancer performed on his radio show. The TV favourite, 47, was forced to come to terms with the fact that the pair dated for three years, before they split in 2013. 5 American Idol host Ryan Seacrest discussed the notion […]]]>

AMERICAN Idol host Ryan Seacrest addressed the “awkwardness” suggestion with ex Julianne Hough as the dancer performed on his radio show.

The TV favourite, 47, was forced to come to terms with the fact that the pair dated for three years, before they split in 2013.

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American Idol host Ryan Seacrest discussed the notion of ‘awkwardness’ with ex Julianne HoughCredit: Getty
The couple dated for three years but split in 2013

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The couple dated for three years but split in 2013Credit: Getty Images – Getty

Julianne, 33, appeared on her radio show On-Air With Ryan Seacrest, alongside her dancer brother Derek.

Ryan immediately addressed the elephant in the room saying, “Jules, for starters, [my cohosts] Sisanie and Tanya asked me if it was embarrassing for me.

“And I said, ‘Not at all because we’re friends’.”

As if to underscore the point, he added, “There’s nothing awkward about it, because we’ve remained friends.”

Actress, singer and Dancing With The Stars pro Julianne saw the funny side as she laughed and admitted the pair were still talking.

She added that they shared “respect and love and all that stuff.”

Most read in Entertainment

Joking about the public nature of their former relationship and split, she quipped, “I have a new publicist now, so it’s like, ‘It’s okay!

“They can talk!”

At the time, the insiders cited their busy work schedules as the reason for their separation.

Previously addressing a split in 2013 on her Instagram Stories, the star hinted that she felt she didn’t “deserve” the luxury of her previous high-profile relationship.

Julianne, who was raised Mormon, said: ‘I was on private planes and yachts and lived in a very, very well-off home – quite different from where I grew up.

“I had just gotten out of that relationship because I wanted to create this for myself. I kinda felt like I didn’t deserve it. I didn’t win this.

“So now I have to go create this for myself.”

OFF SCREEN

Ryan’s career is in the public eye, as is his personal love life.

From 2003 to 2005, the TV host was in a relationship with Shana Wall.

Seacrest and actress Teri Hatcher had a short-lived romance in 2006.

From 2010 to 2013, the American Idol host dated Julianne Hough of Dancing with the Stars.

Seacrest started dating chef and influencer Shayna Taylor in 2013.

The pair were on and off until they called it quits in June 2020.

Hitting Splitsville, a LIVE! with Kelly and Ryan, the spokesperson said, “They remain good friends, each other’s biggest supporters and will always cherish their time together as a couple,”

While Seacrest and Shayna were away, reports surfaced of his alleged romances with model Renee Hall and Miss Teen USA’s Hilary Cruz.

In 2021, the media personality and Audrey Paige entered into a relationship.

During this time, the media host repeatedly addressed ideas of fatherhood.

The famous tycoon says WSJ Magazine: “I want to have children.”

Seacrest continued, “But I didn’t even go down that road, which is crazy at my age.”

He added: “I think last year it became clear to me that yes, I want to do this.…I want to be available and present.”

Ryan insisted that there was no

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Ryan insisted there was ‘nothing uncomfortable’ about having the Dancing With The Stars pro on his radio showCredit: Getty
Julianne was on Ryan's radio show with dancer brother Derek

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Julianne was on Ryan’s radio show with dancer brother DerekCredit: Getty Images – Getty
The broadcaster has already revealed his desire to have children

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The broadcaster has already revealed his desire to have childrenCredit: Instagram/@ryanseacrest

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Covid restrictions hit nursing home staff https://colinmarshallradio.com/covid-restrictions-hit-nursing-home-staff/ Tue, 01 Mar 2022 02:30:13 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/covid-restrictions-hit-nursing-home-staff/ Photo: Getty Images. Pierre Veschaffelt Simon Wallace: Covid restrictions hit nursing home staff The Aged Care Association warns that the sector is close to collapse. Chief executive Simon Wallace says one in five vacancies are unfilled, a shortage of around 1,000 workers – and large numbers of staff are off work due to Covid-19. While […]]]>

Photo: Getty Images.

Pierre Veschaffelt

Simon Wallace: Covid restrictions hit nursing home staff

The Aged Care Association warns that the sector is close to collapse.

Chief executive Simon Wallace says one in five vacancies are unfilled, a shortage of around 1,000 workers – and large numbers of staff are off work due to Covid-19.

While the border closures have prevented qualified nurses from coming from abroad, the pay gap is also having an impact, with nurses receiving between $15,000 and $20,000 less than their public hospital counterparts.

“There are around 40,000 beds in 650 nursing homes across the country and we have 20 of those sites that have had to close some or all of the beds, and that’s affecting older New Zealanders,” Mr Wallace said. .

While Maori occupy only about 5% of beds in nursing homes, a greater percentage of staff are Maori.


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Upstart, SoFi, LendingClub: which Fintech has the largest market share? https://colinmarshallradio.com/upstart-sofi-lendingclub-which-fintech-has-the-largest-market-share/ Tue, 22 Feb 2022 12:05:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/upstart-sofi-lendingclub-which-fintech-has-the-largest-market-share/ Fintech companies fueled by Silicon Valley money have burst into the consumer lending space in recent years, using technology to provide consumers with a smoother user experience, faster decision times on loans and faster funding. One loan product that fintech players have become particularly involved in is the unsecured personal loan, which is not secured […]]]>

Fintech companies fueled by Silicon Valley money have burst into the consumer lending space in recent years, using technology to provide consumers with a smoother user experience, faster decision times on loans and faster funding. One loan product that fintech players have become particularly involved in is the unsecured personal loan, which is not secured by collateral. Decisions to grant these loans are made based on the creditworthiness of the borrower.

Some of the biggest players in this space are none other than popular fintech stocks like Assets received ( UPST -6.71% ), Sofi Technologies ( SOFI -4.29% )and loan club ( CL -4.59% ). Since these stocks are all relatively popular in the stock market and all operate in a similar space, let’s take a look at which ones are looking for top market share in the unsecured personal loan market.

Image source: Getty Images.

Different businesses, same space

When I talk about unsecured personal loans, I’m actually talking about personal loans of $100,000 or less and usually under $50,000. These loans are usually installment loans, which means the borrower receives a lump sum up front and then pays that amount with interest in fixed installments.

As mentioned above, fintech players have really taken over the space as traditional lenders have become more strict about who they lend to and as people have gotten used to doing business online. According to the credit reporting company Experian, in July 2021, the total share of fintech companies in the unsecured personal loan space, particularly for loans under $50,000, reached an all-time high of 57%, which is up significantly from to the previous year. The pandemic may have played a role, so it’s a bit unclear if this is a more permanent trend in terms of market share.

In its latest earnings presentation, Upstart revealed that data from Trans Union, another consumer credit reporting agency, showed that total unsecured personal loans between the third quarter of 2020 and the second quarter of 2021 were $96 billion. And that number is actually higher than the $81 billion reported by TransUnion between Q2 2020 and Q1 2021. Now we can look at the personal loan origination volume at each of these three companies between Q3 2020 and the second quarter of 2021.

Company Q3 2020 Q4 2020 Q1 2021 Q2 2022 Total
Reached $909 million $1.25 billion $1.73 billion $2.8 billion $6.69 billion
SoFi $616 million $613 million $805 million $1.3 billion $3.33 billion
loan club $584 million $912 million $1.5 billion $2.7 billion $5.70 billion

Source of data: Company financial statements.

Data evaluation

Upstart led the way in those four quarters with nearly $6.7 billion in issuance, or about 7% market share. LendingClub followed with around $5.7 billion in origination volume, or around 6% market share, and SoFi had the least with around $3.3 billion in volume. Together, these three companies made about 16% of all unsecured personal loan originations in those four quarters. However, there are a few things to understand.

First of all, although all of these fintech companies are in the business of unsecured personal loans, they are all different. Upstart’s primary goal is to use its artificial intelligence underwriting models to better gauge true borrower quality and eventually replace traditional FICO scoring. Until recently, his main client was close to the principal.

LendingClub is somewhat similar in that it uses its data and machine learning to try to underwrite loans more efficiently. But LendingClub only serves prime and super-prime borrowers, with the average FICO score of borrowers on its balance sheet above 700.

SoFi is much more diverse and seeks to be the one-stop-shop financial services company for high-income people. Personal loans are just one of three lending segments it offers, and the average FICO score of its borrowers is around 749, so even higher than LendingClub. SoFi and LendingClub are banks, while Upstart has no intention of becoming a bank.

Another thing to understand is that origination volume in 2020 was much lighter due to COVID-19. Meanwhile, these three companies were developing or changing their business models. If you look at the last quarters, LendingClub issued over $3 billion in loans in the third and fourth quarters of 2021. Upstart made over $3 billion in the third quarter and then surprised the market with $4.1 billion. dollars of loans in the fourth quarter, because it is now the originator of loans. across the credit spectrum. SoFi has also been growing personal loans at a brisk pace.

As a result, these three companies likely have a higher market share than in the four quarters we just looked at, although the market may have continued to grow in recent quarters as well.

Who holds the first market share?

Given this data, I think it’s safe to say that Upstart is currently the market leader among these three companies in the area of ​​unsecured personal loans. The caveat is that it also lends to borrowers who are lower on the credit spectrum and therefore more likely to default. Upstart claims its technology can better assess credit quality, so if it can fully prove this concept, it will be in great shape.

This article represents the opinion of the author, who may disagree with the “official” recommendation position of a high-end advice service Motley Fool. We are heterogeneous! Challenging an investing thesis — even one of our own — helps us all think critically about investing and make decisions that help us become smarter, happier, and wealthier.

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Radio Station WHMI 93.5 FM – News, Weather, Traffic, Sports, School Updates and the Best Classic Hits from Livingston County Michigan https://colinmarshallradio.com/radio-station-whmi-93-5-fm-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hits-from-livingston-county-michigan-7/ Mon, 21 Feb 2022 13:09:07 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/radio-station-whmi-93-5-fm-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hits-from-livingston-county-michigan-7/ ANATOLII STEPANOV/AFP via Getty Images (NEW YORK) – After weeks of escalating tensions, U.S. officials have warned a Russian attack on Ukraine could happen “any day.” Russia has spent weeks building up military forces near eastern Ukraine, with more than 150,000 troops encircling Ukraine in Belarus and on the Russian side of the border, according […]]]>
ANATOLII STEPANOV/AFP via Getty Images

(NEW YORK) – After weeks of escalating tensions, U.S. officials have warned a Russian attack on Ukraine could happen “any day.”

Russia has spent weeks building up military forces near eastern Ukraine, with more than 150,000 troops encircling Ukraine in Belarus and on the Russian side of the border, according to US officials.

The Kremlin has denied warnings of an imminent invasion and claimed in recent days that it was withdrawing some troops, while US and NATO officials have said – and commercial satellite images have shown – that it there was no sign of de-escalation.

As world leaders continue to deploy diplomatic efforts to avert war between Russia and Ukraine, a senior State Department official told ABC News on Thursday that this is “perhaps the most most perilous to peace and security since the end of the cold war”.

As the conflict unfolds on a global stage, Americans are somewhat mixed about how the United States should respond. In a new Quinnipiac University poll, 57% of Americans said the United States should not send troops to Ukraine if Russia invades, and 54% support Biden’s decision to deploy troops to support allies of NATO.

Earlier this week, President Joe Biden addressed the American public and again made it clear that the United States would not send troops to support Ukraine. But he promised to defend “every square inch” of NATO territory, already deploying several thousand more troops in Europe, and to support the Ukrainian people and their government with deadly defensive weapons, economic aid and US sanctions. and crippling allies against Russia.

This high level of US involvement is necessary, he said, because “it’s not just about Russia and Ukraine.”

“This is about standing up for what we believe in, the future we want for our world, freedom, the right of countless countries to choose their own destiny. And the right of peoples to determine their own future, or the principle that a country cannot change its neighbor’s borders by force,” Biden said. “If we don’t defend freedom where it is threatened today, we will surely pay a higher price tomorrow.”

Links with NATO

To understand the vested interest of the United States in the conflict, one would have to go back to the Cold War, said Craig Albert, associate professor of political science and director of intelligence and security studies at the University of Augusta, at ABC News.

To counter Soviet aggression in Europe, the United States helped form the NATO security alliance, or the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, in 1949. In the years that followed, NATO expanded several times, including adding three former Soviet republics.

Ukraine, a former Soviet republic bordered by Russia to the east, is not a member of NATO, although in 2008 the alliance opened the door to membership. Russian President Vladimir Putin has demanded that this not happen as he seeks to limit NATO along the Russian border.

“Ukraine has attached itself to the West, to NATO,” Albert said. “They still have military agreements, treaties, economic treaties, trade treaties or relations, even though there is no NATO treaty in place between Ukraine and NATO and the states -United”

NATO members bordering Russia are also a concern. The potential impact of the Ukraine conflict on US interests is considered “significant” by the Council on Foreign Relations, which said in part that the conflict “could further deteriorate US-Russian relations and worsen if Russia was expanding its presence in Ukraine or NATO countries.”

As Russia tries to “reassert itself in the great power game”, the United States seeks to maintain the balance of power in Europe and “protect Ukraine as a buffer against Russia’s perceived aggression in Europe itself,” Albert said, noting that Ukraine is “strategically important” to Russia, the United States and NATO.

NATO is “essential to American policy in Europe”, and support for Ukraine for more than 30 years “has been an integral part of American security policy for the entire European continent”, said Matthew Pauly , associate professor of history at Michigan State University. who is an expert on Russia, Ukraine and Eastern Europe, told ABC News.

“There is no doubt that the more east-facing member states of NATO are rightly worried about Russia’s actions in Ukraine,” Pauly said. “The United States obviously considers it its duty to compel, through the responsibilities of NATO membership, to hold the line on NATO’s eastern front.”

Indeed, the United States has already sent troops into the midst of Russian aggression to support NATO’s eastern flank.

“Make no mistake, the United States will defend every square inch of NATO territory with the full force of American power,” Biden said this week. “An attack on one NATO country is an attack on all of us.”

Prevent “world war”

The United States has sent thousands more troops to Central and Eastern Europe in recent weeks, although Biden has made it clear he will not send any to Ukraine to fight Russia and stressed the importance of diplomacy to achieve de-escalation.

In an interview with NBC News anchor Lester Holt earlier this week, Biden acknowledged the risk of another assault. When asked what scenario could lead him to send troops to help Americans in Ukraine, Biden replied: “There is none. It’s a world war when the Americans and Russia start to fight each other. to shoot on.”

“We’re dealing with one of the biggest armies in the world. It’s a very different situation, and things could get crazy quickly,” he said.

The risk of the conflict escalating beyond Ukraine is “high,” ABC News national security and defense analyst Michael “Mick” Patrick Mulroy told ABC News Live this week.

“That should be a concern for everyone,” he said.

Preserving democracy and sovereignty

Another important dimension of US involvement in the crisis is its support for Ukraine as a democracy, Pauly said. Since 1991, when Ukraine declared independence, the United States has offered “substantial” foreign assistance, particularly in the 1990s, to help it emerge from the Soviet period, democratize and develop a free market economy, he said.

“Ukraine is a democracy, it’s the only really functional democracy of a few in the former Soviet space,” Pauly said. “Although democratization has had a kind of rough ride in Ukraine, it’s hard to argue that it’s not a democracy.”

“Democracy in Ukraine deserves to be protected,” he continued. “Democracy is our best guarantee against war and the best assurance of peace.”

The United States, along with its Western allies, has also expressed support for maintaining Ukraine’s sovereignty and territorial integrity against Russian aggression.

Biden said the United States was providing the Ukrainian military with weapons, training and intelligence to help it defend itself.

“Nations have the right to sovereignty and territorial integrity,” the president said on Tuesday. “They have the freedom to chart their own course and choose who they partner with.”

Impact at home

The exact impact of an invasion beyond the front lines remains uncertain. Although Biden warned the American people that there would be “consequences at home” – above all an increase in energy prices as a result.

“I’m not going to pretend it’s going to be painless,” Biden said Tuesday. “There could be an impact on our energy prices, so we are taking active steps to ease the pressure on our own energy markets and offset rising prices.”

In a limited foray into eastern Ukraine, there could be an oil price hike of $5 or $10 a barrel, according to GasBuddy’s Patrick De Haan. Currently, a $1 per barrel increase is equivalent to an increase of about 1.5 cents per gallon in the national average gasoline price. If the United States and its allies impose harsh sanctions on Russia, Russia could retaliate by limiting oil exports, he said, which would impact global markets.

If rising oil and gas prices push the Federal Reserve to be more aggressive in its monetary tightening, that could also have an impact on inflation, according to Mark Zandi, chief economist at Moody’s Analytics.

Cyber ​​warfare also remains a concern. Last month, the Department of Homeland Security warned that the US response to a possible Russian invasion could result in a cyberattack launched against the United States by the Russian government or its proxies.

There is also the impact on US troops as more military forces are deployed to support NATO countries.

“I think [Americans] should pay attention to this as it could significantly affect strategic deployments of US personnel,” Albert said. maybe a Russian invasion.”

Conor Finnegan, Molly Nagle, Sarah Kolinovsky, Zunaira Zaki, Mary Burke, Layne Winn and ABC News’ Will Kim contributed to this report.

Copyright © 2022, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

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Corrections brace for Covid surge https://colinmarshallradio.com/corrections-brace-for-covid-surge/ Thu, 17 Feb 2022 19:58:03 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/corrections-brace-for-covid-surge/ Photo: Getty Images. Claudette Haiti Kelvin Davis: Corrections prepare for Covid surge Corrections Minister Kelvin Davis said his department should be able to deal with the entry of Covid-19 into the prison system. Six of the country’s 18 prisons have reported cases of Omicron, including 46 at the Serco-run men’s correctional facility in Wiri. 229 […]]]>

Photo: Getty Images.

Claudette Haiti

Kelvin Davis: Corrections prepare for Covid surge

Corrections Minister Kelvin Davis said his department should be able to deal with the entry of Covid-19 into the prison system.

Six of the country’s 18 prisons have reported cases of Omicron, including 46 at the Serco-run men’s correctional facility in Wiri.

229 of the 771 detainees are now in quarantine.

46 staff at the Upper North Island prisons are on leave after coming into close contact with positive cases.

Mr Davis says Omicron’s surge was anticipated by Corrections.

“They are prepared for this. The staff who contracted the Covid, they are obviously not at work. They have people who came to replace them, so they sorted everything out to make sure they got enough kaimahi,” he says.

Mount Eden Remand Prison, Waikeria and Spring Hill Prisons have also reported cases.


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Radio Station WHMI 93.5 FM – News, Weather, Traffic, Sports, School Updates and the Best Classic Hits from Livingston County Michigan https://colinmarshallradio.com/radio-station-whmi-93-5-fm-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hits-from-livingston-county-michigan-5/ Tue, 15 Feb 2022 12:18:11 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/radio-station-whmi-93-5-fm-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hits-from-livingston-county-michigan-5/ Stella/Getty Images (SAN FRANCISCO) — As school board meetings across the country grow increasingly contentious, parents’ pushback over COVID-19 regulations and virtual learning has brought matters to a head in San Francis. There, voters head to the polls on Tuesday to decide the fate of three school board members in an unprecedented recall election. San […]]]>
Stella/Getty Images

(SAN FRANCISCO) — As school board meetings across the country grow increasingly contentious, parents’ pushback over COVID-19 regulations and virtual learning has brought matters to a head in San Francis. There, voters head to the polls on Tuesday to decide the fate of three school board members in an unprecedented recall election.

San Francisco School Board President Gabriela López and board members Faauuga Moliga and Alison Collins could all be recalled on Tuesday.

The recall effort began in January last year as tensions rose during the pandemic, with parents saying council members misplaced their priorities, focusing their attention on social issues rather than coping strategies. pandemic reopening at a time when many other school districts were open.

In April, council members scrapped plans to rename a third of the city’s public schools after historical figures linked to injustice following backlash from parents. The board said it would review the plan after students return to in-person learning.

“They would spend the first seven hours talking about renaming the schools or they would spend the first seminar wondering if a gay dad was diverse enough to be on the parent advisory council,” Autumn Looijen, co-campaign manager at Recall the SF School Board, told ABC News. “These things are important. But when you’re dealing with this urgent crisis, they’re not what you should be focusing on.”

Each member will be elected individually and a simple majority is sufficient for the recall to succeed. If the recall is accepted, San Francisco Mayor London Breed, who supports the recall, will be responsible for appointing replacements to fill their remaining terms until an election is held for the three positions in November.

The recall energizes an influx of voters. As of Monday, more than 500,000 mail-in ballots were issued and more than 115,100 ballots were returned, according to the San Francisco Board of Elections.

Among those who vote are non-citizens, who are eligible to vote in local school board elections in San Francisco.

In this election, non-citizens of San Francisco enjoy that right more than ever. At least 258 non-citizens are eligible to vote and more than 120 have already voted in this historic election. That’s a significant increase from the previous school board election in 2020, when just 31 noncitizens cast ballots.

However, it’s not just those who live, work and have children in San Francisco who are stepping up to support the recall. Financial records show the election was largely funded by donations from major donors who do not have children in the public school district.

Campaign finance records show some of the biggest financial contributors are 95-year-old billionaire Arthur Rock and PayPal COO David Sacks, who contributed nearly $400,000 and more than $74,000, respectively. .

The large contributions of the super-rich are a sticking point for many against the recall.

“Anyone who follows this campaign knows that billionaires are trying to buy out public education,” Frank Lara, executive vice president of United Educators of San Francisco, said in an ad encouraging people to vote “No” in the San Francisco elections. Tuesday.

Reminder efforts continue to thrust the subject of education into the spotlight as it becomes more entrenched in policy textbooks. Virginia Governor Glenn Youngkin seized on the issue during his successful run for governor following comments by Democratic gubernatorial candidate Terry McAuliffe that parents shouldn’t tell schools what to teach in a debate.

It’s a trend that doesn’t escape Collins as she reflects on how she came to fight for her job.

“Honestly, I think it’s part of a national trend that we’re seeing. There’s an unprecedented number of recalls and also outrage campaigns happening around school boards,” Collins told ABC News.

In 2022, 25 school board recall efforts are launched against 66 officials nationwide, according to data tracked by Ballotpedia. There are six in California alone. It follows a year in which more than double the average recalls were issued at 92, according to Ballotpedia.

Now, López, Moliga and Collins are awaiting polls to close and votes to be tallied in an election seen as another referendum on tough COVID policies as the midterms approach.

Tuesday’s election is the first time since 1983 that voters in San Francisco have considered removing an elected official from office, when then-mayor Dianne Feinstein survived a recall vote.

Looijen and fellow parent Siva Raj’s efforts, which began around a kitchen table last year, showcase the new avenues parents are taking when it comes to their children’s educational futures after some say virtual learning has disrupted student success.

“I think there’s a common thread that public education is a vital government service. It’s one of the essential public services that we expect in any of these situations. And when you take that away , you’ll have angry and frustrated parents. Guaranteed,” Raj said.

Copyright © 2022, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

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Radio Station WHMI 93.5 FM – News, Weather, Traffic, Sports, School Updates and the Best Classic Hits from Livingston County Michigan https://colinmarshallradio.com/radio-station-whmi-93-5-fm-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hits-from-livingston-county-michigan-4/ Wed, 09 Feb 2022 01:15:57 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/radio-station-whmi-93-5-fm-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hits-from-livingston-county-michigan-4/ Lucas Ninno/Getty Images (NEW YORK) — As the COVID-19 pandemic has swept the world, more than 5.7 million people have died from the disease worldwide, including more than 908,000 Americans, according to compiled real-time data. by the Center for Systems Science and Systems at Johns Hopkins University. Engineering. About 64.2% of the population in the […]]]>
Lucas Ninno/Getty Images

(NEW YORK) — As the COVID-19 pandemic has swept the world, more than 5.7 million people have died from the disease worldwide, including more than 908,000 Americans, according to compiled real-time data. by the Center for Systems Science and Systems at Johns Hopkins University. Engineering.

About 64.2% of the population in the United States is fully vaccinated against COVID-19, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Latest headlines:
-Daily cases below 300,000 for the 1st time this year
-Omicron is estimated at 96.4% of new cases
-Michigan closes bridge to Canada amid trucker-led protests
-Oregon will lift mask mandates for indoor public spaces and schools by March 31

Here’s how the news evolves. All times Eastern.

February 08, 7:32 p.m.
Boston mayor sets out guidelines to drop vaccine proof requirement

Boston Mayor Michelle Wu outlined plans to drop evidence of the city’s vaccine requirement at indoor businesses, including bars, movie theaters and restaurants.

The city must have fewer than 200 COVID-19 hospitalizations per day, 95% of intensive care beds must be free, and the community positivity rate must be below 5%, before the requirement is removed, he said. she stated.

“The quickest way to ensure that we ease pressure on hospital capacity and reduce community positivity is to continue filling the gaps with vaccination and boosters,” Wu said in a statement.

There are no immediate plans to end the city’s mask mandate in schools, she added.

ABC News’ Arielle Mitropoulos

February 08, 7:20 p.m.
LA County maintains mask mandate for schools

While California Governor Gavin Newsom announced on Monday that he would end the statewide mask mandate next week, Los Angeles County health officials said on Tuesday that they had no immediate plans to drop their mask mandate.

Los Angeles County Health Department Director Dr. Barbara Ferrer told reporters that the county’s decision will be made based on whether the number of hospitalizations drops or if the vaccination is approved for young people. children.

The mandate will be dropped when daily hospitalizations fall below 2,500 for seven consecutive days, according to Ferrer. Once that threshold is reached, “masking will no longer be required outdoors at outdoor mega events or in indoor outdoor spaces in day care centers and K-12 schools,” Ferrer said.

Even if this threshold is not met, the mandate could be abandoned eight weeks after the approval of vaccines for children under 5 years old. Pfizer has submitted an application to the Food and Drug Administration to have its vaccine approved for children 6 months to 5 years old. A hearing is scheduled for February 15.

Los Angeles County is the second largest school district in the nation, with over 600,000 students.

February 08, 1:53 p.m.
Daily cases below 300,000 for the first time this year

The U.S. case rate is down, down 63.4% since the peak three weeks ago, according to federal data.

For the first time since December, daily cases in the United States are below 300,000.

However, experts continue to warn that the United States is not off the hook. Case levels remain much higher than the country’s previous surges, and the United States is still reporting millions of new cases every week. Experts also point out that many Americans who take home tests do not submit their results and therefore the total number of cases may be higher than reported.

On average, about 13,000 Americans with COVID-19 are admitted to hospital each day — a drop of 26.4% in the past week, according to federal data.

Emergency room visits with diagnosed cases of COVID-19 are also down, down nearly 60% in the past month, according to federal data.

The U.S. mortality average is at a plateau, with the country reporting about 2,300 new COVID-19-related deaths every day, according to federal data. This average is significantly lower than last winter, when the country peaked at around 3,400 deaths per day.

ABC News’ Arielle Mitropoulos

February 08, 11:28 a.m.
Omicron is estimated at 96.4% of new cases

The presence of the omicron subvariant, BA.2, is increasing in the United States, according to new data released by the CDC.

BA.2 is estimated to account for 3.6% of new COVID-19 cases in the United States as of February 5. BA.2 is expected to represent 1.2% of new cases the previous week.

The original omicron strain, B.1.1.529, still makes up the vast majority of new cases, accounting for about 96.4% of cases in the United States.

There are still many unknowns about the BA.2 variant, but currently it does not appear to demonstrate more severe disease. There is also no indication that BA.2 will have any further impact on vaccine efficacy.

The delta variant, which accounted for 99.2% of all new cases just two months ago, is now estimated at 0% of new cases.

ABC News’ Arielle Mitropoulos, Eric M. Strauss

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Radio Station WHMI 93.5 FM – News, Weather, Traffic, Sports, School Updates and the Best Classic Hits from Livingston County Michigan https://colinmarshallradio.com/radio-station-whmi-93-5-fm-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hits-from-livingston-county-michigan-3/ Mon, 07 Feb 2022 17:42:42 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/radio-station-whmi-93-5-fm-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hits-from-livingston-county-michigan-3/ Luis Alvarez/Getty Images (NEW YORK) — As the COVID-19 pandemic has swept the world, more than 5.7 million people have died from the disease worldwide, including more than 904,000 Americans, according to compiled real-time data. by the Center for Systems Science and Systems at Johns Hopkins University. Engineering. About 64.1% of the population in the […]]]>
Luis Alvarez/Getty Images

(NEW YORK) — As the COVID-19 pandemic has swept the world, more than 5.7 million people have died from the disease worldwide, including more than 904,000 Americans, according to compiled real-time data. by the Center for Systems Science and Systems at Johns Hopkins University. Engineering.

About 64.1% of the population in the United States is fully vaccinated against COVID-19, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Latest titles:
-Connecticut to end statewide school mask mandate
-New Jersey governor to end mask mandate for schools
-All states reporting declining or stable new case rates

Here’s how the news evolves. All times Eastern.

February 07, 4:56 p.m.
Cases in children continue to drop but are still ‘extremely high’

After the United States reported an unprecedented number of new pediatric COVID-19 infections last month, updated data released Monday shows new cases among children have fallen for the second consecutive week.

Nearly 632,000 children tested positive for COVID-19 last week, a huge drop from the record high of 1,150,000 reported the week ending Jan. 20, according to a new report from the American Academy of Pediatrics and of the Children’s Hospital Association.

However, the organizations warn that pediatric cases remain “extremely high” and are still double the level seen during the Delta’s summer surge.

The AAP and CHA noted that there is an “urgent” need to collect more age-specific data to assess disease severity related to new variants as well as potential longer-term effects.

ABC News’ Arielle Mitropoulos

February 07, 4:34 p.m.
Connecticut to end statewide school mask mandate

Connecticut Gov. Ned Lamont announced on Monday that he recommends ending the statewide mask mandate beginning Feb. 28.

Starting in March, the decision on masks in schools will rest with superintendents and mayors based on individual cities’ needs, he said.

It comes hours after New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy said his requirement to wear face masks in schools would end on March 7.

The CDC said it continues to recommend masks for all students 2 and older, regardless of their vaccination status.

February 07, 2:50 p.m.
The White House has contracted 569 million free tests so far

President Joe Biden’s administration has so far contracted for about 569 million rapid home tests as it works to fulfill Biden’s pledge for 1 billion free tests nationwide, has a White House official told ABC News.

According to an ABC News analysis, testing company iHealth is supplying the government with the most tests to meet this goal, with a contract to supply 354 million tests. Roche, Abbott and Siemens are other companies providing testing.

White House officials said about 60 million households have placed test orders so far, for a total of 240 million tests (each household can order four).

The U.S. Postal Service said on Friday it had mailed tests to “tens of millions” of those households.

ABC News’ Cheyenne Haslett, Ben Gittleson, Lucien Bruggeman

February 07, 11:54 a.m.
New Jersey governor to end mask mandate for schools

New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy announced on Monday that the state’s requirement to wear face masks in schools will end on March 7.

“Balancing public health with returning to some semblance of normalcy isn’t easy. But we can take this step responsibly due to declining COVID numbers and growth in vaccinations,” Murphy tweeted.

Murphy, a Democrat, has imposed some of the toughest pandemic-related mandates in the country. New Jersey, an early hotspot for COVID-19 cases, has lost more than 31,000 residents to the virus.

The move follows a move last month by Pennsylvania Governor Tom Wolf, also a Democrat, to rescind his state’s mask mandate for schools.

Meanwhile, Democratic governors in New York and Connecticut have said they are reassessing school mask mandates set to expire later this month.

ABC News’ Aaron Katersky

Copyright © 2022, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

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Radio Station WHMI 93.5 FM – News, Weather, Traffic, Sports, School Updates and the Best Classic Hits from Livingston County Michigan https://colinmarshallradio.com/radio-station-whmi-93-5-fm-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hits-from-livingston-county-michigan/ Wed, 26 Jan 2022 23:02:26 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/radio-station-whmi-93-5-fm-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hits-from-livingston-county-michigan/ Go Nakamura/Getty Images (NEW YORK) — As the COVID-19 pandemic has swept the world, more than 5.6 million people have died from the disease worldwide, including more than 872,000 Americans, according to compiled real-time data. by the Center for Systems Science and Systems at Johns Hopkins University. Engineering. About 63.5% of the population in the […]]]>
Go Nakamura/Getty Images

(NEW YORK) — As the COVID-19 pandemic has swept the world, more than 5.6 million people have died from the disease worldwide, including more than 872,000 Americans, according to compiled real-time data. by the Center for Systems Science and Systems at Johns Hopkins University. Engineering.

About 63.5% of the population in the United States is fully vaccinated against COVID-19, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Here’s how the news evolves. All times Eastern:

January 26, 6:36 p.m.
1st participant to receive Moderna’s omicron-specific vaccine

Moderna announced Wednesday that the first participant has been dosed in the Phase 2 study of its omicron-specific booster candidate, in case it becomes necessary.

The Moderna trials will include people who received two doses of the original Moderna vaccine and people who received two doses of the original Moderna vaccine and a Moderna booster shot.

Pfizer announced on Tuesday that it has launched clinical studies to evaluate an omicron-based vaccine for adults.

January 26, 5 p.m.
NIH trial finds mixing and matching boosters safe and effective

A National Institutes of Health study published in the New England Journal of Medicine found that mix-and-match boosters are safe and create an immune response similar to sticking with your initial vaccine.

An earlier version of this study, with more preliminary results, helped guide the CDC’s decision to allow mix-and-match.

The study authors do not claim that specific combinations are more or less effective. The study found that people who received an mRNA vaccine (Pfizer or Moderna) and then received the Johnson & Johnson booster had a significant increase in T-cell response, part of immunity.

The trial involved 458 participants who received a vaccine without prior COVID-19 infection. This data relates only to the first 29 days following receipt of the reminder; the researchers plan to follow the participants for a year, which will provide more data.

– ABC News’ Vanya Jain, Sony Salzman, Eric Strauss, Dr. Alexis Carrington

January 26, 4:47 p.m.
Unvaccinated child dies in Mississippi

An unvaccinated child has died in Mississippi of COVID-19, according to the state health department.

The department confirmed to ABC News that the child was between 11 and 17 years old, an eligible age range to receive Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine.

This was the 10th child – including an infant – to die in Mississippi from COVID-19. None of the 10 children have been vaccinated, according to the health department.

-Josh Hoyos of ABC News

January 26, 10:40 a.m.
US hospital admissions set to fall for first time in months

Hospital admissions related to COVID-19 in the United States are expected to fall in the coming weeks, the first time the country has seen a drop in months, according to forecasting models used by the CDC.

Estimates suggest that between 4,900 and 27,800 Americans could be admitted to hospital each day by February 18.

Deaths from COVID-19 are expected to remain stable or have an uncertain trend. Estimates suggest about 33,000 more Americans could die from COVID-19 over the next two weeks.

– ABC News’ Arielle Mitropoulos

January 25, 6:06 p.m.
All Super Bowl attendees will receive a KN95 mask

Every attendee at next month’s Super Bowl in Los Angeles will receive a KN95 mask, health officials announced Tuesday.

Additionally, “members of the safety team” will remind fans to keep their masks on unless they’re eating or drinking, Los Angeles County Public Health Director Barbara Ferrer said during the interview. a meeting of the county board of supervisors.

Super Bowl Experience attendees will also receive a free at-home rapid test kit, Ferrer said, with messages to test ahead of the big game on Feb. 13 at SoFi Stadium.

The county plans to distribute more than 60,000 take-out kits at the Super Bowl Experience, which will be held at the Los Angeles Convention Center from February 5-12.

-Jennifer Watts of ABC News

Copyright © 2022, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

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