high school – Colin Marshall Radio http://colinmarshallradio.com/ Fri, 25 Mar 2022 14:18:17 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://colinmarshallradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-1-1-120x120.png high school – Colin Marshall Radio http://colinmarshallradio.com/ 32 32 Melody Walker, public radio producer and STLPR reporter, dies https://colinmarshallradio.com/melody-walker-public-radio-producer-and-stlpr-reporter-dies/ Fri, 11 Mar 2022 23:26:07 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/melody-walker-public-radio-producer-and-stlpr-reporter-dies/ Longtime public radio journalist and producer, wonderful friend, loving mother, sister and partner Melody Walker died of cancer at home on March 4. She was 62 and lived in the Central West End neighborhood of St. Louis. Walker comes from several generations of pioneering Midwestern journalists and editors. She began reporting at the age of […]]]>

Longtime public radio journalist and producer, wonderful friend, loving mother, sister and partner Melody Walker died of cancer at home on March 4.

She was 62 and lived in the Central West End neighborhood of St. Louis.

Walker comes from several generations of pioneering Midwestern journalists and editors. She began reporting at the age of 10 for her father, Hayes Walker III, who published the cattle magazine, The Hereford Journal.

She became a radio journalist in Kansas City at age 16.

Walker graduated from Barnard College with a degree in philosophy and, as a student, was invited by CBS veteran Fred Friendly to work with him on a PBS series. She ran the news department for WKCR, Columbia University’s radio station, overseeing a team of 40 reporters. She’s done everything from covering the United Nations General Assembly to producing live jazz shows from clubs in the Morningside Heights neighborhood.

Walker has had a distinctive and award-winning career in public radio. As soon as she graduated from Barnard, she brought her fluency in French and her journalism skills to Europe.

As a reporter for NPR in France, Walker covered a series of terrorist attacks in Paris in the 1980s.

In the early 1980s, Walker reported from Paris for NPR, Deutsche Welle and Radio France, among others. She has covered the terrorist attacks, French politics, the champagne trade, the 40th anniversary of D-Day and the Cannes Film Festival.

There, she was discovered by a film producer and chosen to play Joan of Arc in a TV movie. Walker has also produced various jazz and classical concerts in the United States and Europe for distribution by Ofreidia, a French production company.

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Walker produced the “Lenny Lopate Show” at the WNYC and also covered political stories as a reporter.

Walker returned to the United States and became lead producer for the “Lenny Lopate Show” at the WNYC.

In 1989, she was hired as New York and later Chicago bureau chief for the public radio business program “Marketplace.” During this time she had her two children, Kyle and Blair, whom she later raised in Chicago, Paris, New York and St. Louis.

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Walker in the summer of 2021 with his partner, John Barth (left), daughter, Blair O’Brien (center left) and son, Kyle O’Brien.

“Melody was a gifted reporter with great storytelling skills and a sense of humor that made the eyes and ears of all who enjoyed her reporting shine,” recalls “Marketplace” founding executive producer Jim Russell. “I remember best his colorful reporting from France – hearing him was almost as good as being there yourself.”

Walker also wrote and produced commentary for renowned CBS Radio personality Charles Osgood. She was proud of her one-on-one interviews with Amazon’s Jeff Bezos; Thomas Watson, then CEO of IBM, and publisher Malcolm Forbes.

In St. Louis, Walker handled marketing communications for St. Louis University and Washington University’s Olin Business School.

She returned to public radio briefly in 2018 as a business and economic development reporter for St. Louis Public Radio.

Melody Walker wears red glasses and large over-ear headphones and speaks into a St. Louis Public Radio microphone in a radio studio.

Evie Hemphill

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St. Louis Public Radio

Walker, a former economic development reporter for St. Louis Public Radio, joined “St. Louis on the Air” as a guest in November 2018.

She balanced her professional accomplishments with civic duty. Walker has served as an officer and board member of the Central West End Association and STL Village, an on-site seniors service and advocacy organization.

Walker loved France and all things French, Halloween, dinner parties, perfect croissants, champagne, the Missouri Botanical Garden, tending his own garden and greenhouse, spying on bunnies and butterflies. She was happier in Paris and New York.

She is survived by her two children, Kyle Walker O’Brien of Paris and Blair Walker O’Brien of Manhattan; his partner, John Barth of St. Louis; his mother, Claudette; and his sister, Hayley, and brother-in-law Jack Rees of Kansas City. And also Cooper, from Manhattan, the only dog ​​she ever loved.

His family says loved ones can honor his life by making donations to Village STL or the Missouri Botanical Garden.

A celebration of Walker’s life will be held in June.

This recollection was written by John Barth, partner of Melody Walker and veteran of public and commercial radio.

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Why is Black History Month important? https://colinmarshallradio.com/why-is-black-history-month-important/ Sat, 26 Feb 2022 12:54:56 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/why-is-black-history-month-important/ About 10 years ago, Shukree Hassan Tilghman tried to cancel Black History Month. Equipped with a sandwich board with the words “End of Black History Month” written across the front, he scoured the streets of New York City looking for people to sign his petition to eliminate him. To understand what Tilghman was doing, it […]]]>

About 10 years ago, Shukree Hassan Tilghman tried to cancel Black History Month.

Equipped with a sandwich board with the words “End of Black History Month” written across the front, he scoured the streets of New York City looking for people to sign his petition to eliminate him.

To understand what Tilghman was doing, it helps to know that the other side of his sign said “Black history is American history.” It also helps to know that he was filming all of this for a documentary he did,”More than a monthThis film explored an ongoing question about Black History Month; rather than highlighting the accomplishments of African Americans, does it instead maintain a segregated history of America?

“Some people think it was a stunt,” says Tilghman. In some ways it was, but it was also authentic.

Tilghman says the “main impetus” for her petition to end Black History Month was rooted in her childhood. Both of her parents were teachers, and those posters of famous black people that appeared on classroom walls and in school hallways every February were in her home year-round. When he was little, Black History Month was exciting, but since he heard the same stories of a few sanitized heroes repeating themselves one month a year, it started to feel insulting. “We were invisible for 11 months of the year, but now suddenly we were visible in February,” he says.

“What did it mean that we had Black History Month,” he began to wonder.

“And what would that mean if we didn’t?”

Why did Carter G. Woodson invent it?

Talk to any group of historians about the significance of Black History Month and they will all mention the same name: Carter G. Woodson.

“We call him the father of black history,” says Diana Ramey Berry, chair of the history department at the University of Texas at Austin.

In 1926 Woodson founded Negro History Week – which would become what we now call black history month.

“The idea was to make resources available for teachers — black teachers — to celebrate and talk about the contributions that black people had made to America,” says Karsonya Wise Whitehead, founding executive director of the Karson Institute for Race, Peace, and Social Justice at Loyola University. Whitehead is also a former secretary of ASALH – the Association for the Study of African American Life and History, which Woodson founded in 1915.

Woodson chose the week in February marked by the birth of Abraham Lincoln and the chosen birthday of Frederick Douglass, as those days were celebrated in his community. In this way, Woodson built on a black tradition that already commemorated the past.

“He also understood that for black students to see themselves beyond where they are now, they needed to be able to learn more about the contributions their ancestors had made to this country,” Whitehead said.

The historical context of the moment is also key, according to Berry. “African Americans were about 50 years out of slavery trying to find their place in the United States,” she says.

This space was violently demarcated by white supremacy. “We were living through segregation, lynchings, mass murders and massacres,” Berry says. A few years ago it was the so-called 1919 red summer, when white mobs attacked black neighborhoods and towns. Then in 1921 came the Tulsa Race Massacre.

Along with white supremacist violence was an attempt to whitewash US history, excluding both the contributions and realities of black people. It was the time when statues of Confederate soldiers were erected and the myth of the lost cause – the lie that the Civil War was about preserving a distinguished way of life and that slaves were treated well – became a dominant narrative. “Not just in the South,” says Hasan Kwame Jeffries, a history professor at Ohio State University.

“A complete revision and distortion of the Civil War, slavery, emancipation, reconstruction was deeply embedded in the American public education system,” he adds.

“Let’s Talk About Blacks”

Growing up in New York public schools in the 1980s, Jeffries says Black History Month was a lot like “let’s talk about black people for a few days.”

“It was the usual cast of characters,” he says. Martin Luther King Jr., Frederick Douglass, Harriet Tubman, a few black inventors – “and then we’d move on.”

Said Whitehead, “At school, all of a sudden it all turned black, didn’t it?”

“So you put your macaroni and cheese and your collard greens in the cafeteria. You line the halls with all this black art that would then be taken down at the end of February,” she says.

Black History Month can sometimes seem symbolic, but it’s still necessary, says Whitehead. “You can go to places,” she says, spouting the names of states, “where if you didn’t have Black History Month, there wouldn’t be any conversation.”

What we need is an inclusive and accurate American history, according to Berry. But American history remains a segregated space. “When you take American history classes, a lot of those classes are taught from the perspective of only Americans and white students,” Berry says.

The paradox of Black History Month today, says Whitehead, is that we still need it, even if it’s not enough. “We want black history to be American history,” she says. “But we understand that without Black History Month, they won’t teach it in the American history curriculum.”

Which brings us back to Tilghman and an answer to his question: what would it mean if we didn’t have Black History Month?

“If, but for Black History Month, those stories wouldn’t be told,” Tilghman says, “then we have a bigger problem that isn’t Black History Month. isn’t really a reason to maintain Black History Month.”

“It’s a reason to fight for something better than Black History Month.”

Parallels to Woodson’s time

There have been efforts in some states, and in some programs to integrate American history throughout the year, progressing slowly. But Hasan Jeffries says the moment we find ourselves in right now parallels perfectly the period in which Carter G. Woodson founded Negro History Week and January 6th. Once again, at the center of it all is a battle over who controls history.

“We see the same pushback now with these divisive topics and these divisive issues,” Jeffries says, referring to ““divisiveness” laws in Republican-led states that forbid acknowledging that America was founded on racist principles.

“If we can just take Rosa Parks out sitting on a bus and put her back on the bus without talking about it, that’s fine,” Jeffries says. “But we don’t want to talk about the society as a whole that supported and embraced Jim Crow. And how inequality is literally written into the American constitution.”

Integrating black history into American history is not a simple act of inclusion, says Jeffries. You can’t just insert black people who have invented things or made notable contributions into a timeline, he says.

“You start to have to question what you assume to be fundamental truths about the American experience, the myth of perpetual progress and American exceptionalism – it all comes crashing down,” says Jeffries.

But change is coming, he notes.

The undergraduates Jeffries teaches don’t necessarily start out with a complete understanding of United States history, but many now show up in his class precisely because they feel they haven’t been told everything. the story.

“They’ve seen all of this happen over the last four or five years – the rise of racism, white supremacy and hate,” he says of some of his white students. “And they come to college saying, okay, something’s wrong.”

Feed the appetite for a solid story

This thirst for black history, for robust American history, is something high school teacher Ernest Crim III has tapped into on social media. His tiktok videos about black characters in history have gone viral, racking up tens of thousands of views. One of these the videos were about Carter G. Woodsonand the origins of Black History Month.

Crim is a black teacher who teaches black, Latino, and white students in a Chicago suburb, which means he’s in many ways like the teachers Woodson created to serve Black History Week. “Woodson created Negro History Week for a particular purpose,” Crim explains. “So we could get together and discuss what we’ve been doing all year, not celebrate it for a week, which eventually turned into a month.”

That’s why in Crim’s history class, February isn’t the only time they talk about people of color. “In each unit of study, I look for examples of what black people and Latinos were doing at that time,” he says.

“We’ll get to my class’s civil rights unit, probably in March,” he says. “They’re going to think it’s February, with all that we’re talking about black people.”

For Crim, in teaching history, separate is not equal.

Illinois, where he teaches, has no divisiveness law, but even without an outright ban, he says many of his students don’t learn anything about systemic racism in American history. “Even though not every state bans it, it’s not necessary because most history teachers don’t do it at all,” Crim says. You don’t need to ban something that isn’t really taught in the first place.

Teaching history, teaching integrated honest history, can be transformative, says Crim. “It’s about changing your thoughts and it can change your whole generation. It can change your family. It might change, just the trajectory of your whole life,” he says.

“The story that we as Americans tell about who we were, that story tells us who we are,” says Shukree Tilghman.

Tilghman’s campaign to end Black History Month left him with a renewed respect for the rich history of the month itself. In recent years, it may seem like history has resurfaced as a battleground for American identity, but it has always been that way. “History is about power,” says Tilghman, “and who has the power to tell the story.”

Black History Month, at its best, has the ability to open the door to some sort of narrative repairs, says Hasan Jeffries. “I mean, that’s part of the power of Black History Month. It holds America accountable for the narrative it tells about the past.”

Copyright 2022 NPR. To learn more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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St. John’s Radio Show Turns 70: From Tapes to Digital Recordings, ‘The Old, Old Story’ Continues https://colinmarshallradio.com/st-johns-radio-show-turns-70-from-tapes-to-digital-recordings-the-old-old-story-continues/ Fri, 25 Feb 2022 20:21:01 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/st-johns-radio-show-turns-70-from-tapes-to-digital-recordings-the-old-old-story-continues/ A local religious radio broadcast that has been running for 70 years conjures up images of when families sat around the living room listening to the old vacuum tube radio, playing with the tuning knob and antenna to reduce the noise. static electricity and squeaks, until it is at its best. he could on the […]]]>

A local religious radio broadcast that has been running for 70 years conjures up images of when families sat around the living room listening to the old vacuum tube radio, playing with the tuning knob and antenna to reduce the noise. static electricity and squeaks, until it is at its best. he could on the station.

“The Old, Old Story Radio Broadcast” celebrated its 70th anniversary this month with weekly Sunday morning broadcasts on the VOCM network.

Even though the message and the music haven’t changed much over the decades, the radio technology and the way the show is produced has outgrown it.

Ivan Butler has been the show’s program announcer for over 40 years. It saw the transformation from hand-splicing large reel-to-reel tapes that were hand-delivered to the station, to digital files edited on a computer and mailed.

Old, Old Story radio announcer Ivan Butler at work on a recent recording of the show. – Contributed

Butler said they are always encouraged by the comments they receive from people who listen directly to the show and from others they meet in their daily lives, through professional or personal functions, who mention that they listen to the broadcast. And that motivates them to continue the program.

“For some, it’s the only church they know,” Butler said. “I don’t know if I can explain why this continues…your large demographic is probably over 50, but the over 50s who were listening 70 years ago are long gone, as are those who were probably listening since 20 years since.As one cohort moves out, another moves in, and if that will continue after this tech-savvy generation begins to age, we’ll see.

“I don’t place a lot of importance on longevity, it has to be relevant. The gospel is timeless, it speaks to all ages. Longevity is never an achievement in itself, it’s great, but not in itself, you have to stay relevant. There is a constant effort at all times to talk about the issues of the day, to stay in touch as much as possible and to be sensitive to how (listeners) want to hear the gospel.

William Hollett, founder and first director of
William Hollett, founder and first director of “The Old, Old Story Radio Broadcast”. The radio show celebrated 70 years in a row this month. – Contributed

Elim Congregation Fund Program

The 30-minute show is produced and funded by the Elim Pentecostal Tabernacle in St. John’s. This cost of producing the show which reaches approximately 25,000 listeners across the province each week is borne by the church congregation. And that cost runs into the thousands of dollars a year.

Reverend Fred Penney, senior pastor at Elim, delivers the message on the recorded radio broadcast from his office in the church. He said the show was part of the identity of Elim which itself began in St. John’s over 100 years ago – first in a downtown building, then on Casey Street, and later on Ropewalk Lane and the present church building on Kenmount Road.

“We’re like the original Pentecostal Church in Newfoundland and Labrador that goes way back,” Penney said. “My great-grandfather helped start this church.

“I used to listen to ‘The Old, Old Story’ as a kid and teenager, and my dad listened to it. So now, in a sense, this institution has been given to me, if you mean that, and it’s not It’s not just that — we’re in charge of the gospel, and that’s obviously the greatest value we have. And we want to represent the gospel well and we want to represent ‘The Old Old Story’ well.

Elim Pentecostal Tabernacle Pastor, Rev.  Fred Penney, records his message for the latest edition of
Elim Pentecostal Tabernacle pastor, Reverend Fred Penney, records his message for the latest edition of “The Old, Old Story Radio Broadcast” into a microphone connected to his computer in his office. – Contributed

“The Old, Old Story” is heard on 13 VOCM affiliates across Newfoundland and Labrador and features a gospel message and music. If listeners miss an episode, they can simply go to the church’s website and replay it. It was not an option 70 years ago.

Butler said the response they’re getting to the program continues to show there’s a need, and that’s why they’re continuing to produce it.

“Where there is a need, there is a duty to the gospel and a debt to society. The gospel is not the gospel if it is not spoken. The very meaning of the gospel of the world is good news, so I think the idea that you keep your religion to yourself is incompatible with Christianity. It is incompatible with the gospel,” he said.

“There is always a responsibility to be shared and whatever platform that may be. I’m sure there are a lot of new platforms it’s being shared on, but the gospel must be told or it’s not the gospel at all. The church ceases to be the church when it ceases to carry the message and when I say the church, I am not talking about a denomination or a building, but the church being the body of Christ on Earth .

Dorothy Collins singing one of the songs incorporated into
Dorothy Collins singing one of the songs incorporated into “The Old, Old Story Radio Broadcast”. – Contributed
Pastor Graham Noble recording the message for
Rev. Graham Noble recording the message for “The Old, Old Story Radio Broadcast” at Casey Street Church in St. John’s. The building was used from 1937 to 1965. – Contribution

Penney said “The Old, Old Story Radio Broadcast” is trans-denominational in that the listeners who speak are of all faiths or affiliated with none. People contacted him, from fishing boats on the Grand Banks, to a lady who called just to say she was teaching her mother at school, to her former high school English teacher.

“A lot of people who call to pray or just to say something about the program, often they start by saying ‘now I’m not Pentecostal but…'” he said.

“Newfoundland has a bit of a history of denominational division, of partisanship, and we notice that ‘The Old, Old Story’ crosses all of those boundaries. People are listening from all walks of life and from all traditions and I think that’s a very beautiful thing.

Jordan Porter, Technical Director of
Jordan Porter, technical director of “The Old, Old Story Radio Broadcast”. – Contributed
A recording of
A recording of “The Old, Old Story Radio Broadcast” before a live congregation at the Elim Pentecostal Tabernacle when it was on Casey Street in St. John’s from 1937 to 1965. – Contributed
Reverend Fred Penney (left) and program announcer Ivan Butler say gospel messages still reach people of all faiths and walks of life through the radio.
Reverend Fred Penney (left) and program announcer Ivan Butler say gospel messages still reach people of all faiths and walks of life through the radio. “The Old, Old Story Radio Broadcast” celebrates 70 years on the air this month. -Glen Whiffen

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Radio station shares bilingual news with Gorge Farmworkers / Public News Service https://colinmarshallradio.com/radio-station-shares-bilingual-news-with-gorge-farmworkers-public-news-service/ Fri, 25 Feb 2022 00:03:10 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/radio-station-shares-bilingual-news-with-gorge-farmworkers-public-news-service/ A unique radio station in the Columbia River Gorge provides news in English and Spanish, on topics ranging from the environment to immigration. Radio Tierra is a small community station in Hood River serving farm workers who are mostly from Mexico and live on both the Oregon and Washington sides. “Its purpose is to reach […]]]>

A unique radio station in the Columbia River Gorge provides news in English and Spanish, on topics ranging from the environment to immigration.

Radio Tierra is a small community station in Hood River serving farm workers who are mostly from Mexico and live on both the Oregon and Washington sides.

“Its purpose is to reach out to this community and talk about environmental and social issues that are happening in our communities, and for them to understand how climate change or environmental crisis is affecting our communities,” said Ubaldo Hernandez, host. of a broadcast on the station. called “Conoce Tu Columbia.”

Hernandez addresses a range of issues on his show, such as the effects of pesticides on health and water quality in the Columbia, and how people can get involved in the solutions to these issues. He is also the main organizer of the Columbia Riverkeeper group.

Leti Moretti, a Radio Tierra volunteer who hosted her own show, said the station provided a way for people to get involved in their community. Moretti said she would use her show to talk about topics like COVID-19 and immigration and to dispel misinformation.

“We know that information in Spanish comes much later than for the English language, and the same goes for misinformation,” she said. “To correct it, it takes about four times longer to correct in Spanish than in English, because there aren’t as many checkpoints.”

Moretti said Radio Tierra has a special relationship with the region it serves. People called on his show just to say they lost their wallet at the grocery store and needed help finding it. She said someone called once to say a family’s fridge had broken down.

“It took less than 60 minutes before someone called me and said, ‘We have a refrigerator in the back of our truck. Just let us know where we need to deliver it.’ They had an extra one in one of the orchards they delivered to this family,” she said. “So that kind of magic was really cool to see.”

Moretti said these are not all serious conversations on Radio Tierra. When a request comes in to lighten things up, the deejays are happy to oblige with some upbeat tunes.

Disclosure: Columbia Riverkeeper contributes to our fund for endangered species and wildlife, environmental, water reporting. If you would like to help support news in the public interest, click here.

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Noonan’s new radio show is looking to make waves https://colinmarshallradio.com/noonans-new-radio-show-is-looking-to-make-waves/ Fri, 18 Feb 2022 00:50:49 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/noonans-new-radio-show-is-looking-to-make-waves/ By Marcus Uhe Michelle Anne Noonan’s new Casey Radio program brings her love of poetry to the airwaves of the Southeast. Ms. Noonan launched ‘Poets Corner’, an hour of poetic power on Sunday afternoons in January, featuring emerging creators from across the region to showcase their skills and discuss the art. Ms Noonan has been […]]]>

By Marcus Uhe

Michelle Anne Noonan’s new Casey Radio program brings her love of poetry to the airwaves of the Southeast.

Ms. Noonan launched ‘Poets Corner’, an hour of poetic power on Sunday afternoons in January, featuring emerging creators from across the region to showcase their skills and discuss the art.

Ms Noonan has been writing poetry since she was a child, growing up immersing herself in Shakespeare and the language of Old English, despite the extra research needed to find out what she was actually reading.

She led a poetry group called “Poetry Pastures” and wrote several books, including “Silence Speaks Beauty” and “Sensual Whispers.”

“I love writing poetry, going out in the middle of the weekend, laying out a picnic rug and just writing,” Ms Noonan said of her relationship with literacy.

“Throughout high school, I wrote a lot of poetry. I wrote poems for people in relationships when they didn’t know what to say to their partner.

Ms. Noonan coordinates the animation of the show as a volunteer around her full-time professional commitments in customer relations.

Each week, the show seeks to highlight a different topic; Her first show coincided with January 26 and was Australia Day themed, and in the coming weeks her show will highlight love (February 20), hilarious rhymes (February 27), Mental Health Awareness (March 6) and Independent Poets (March 13).

One of the show’s goals is to promote the use of poetry as an effective coping mechanism for people struggling with their mental health.

Ms Noonan hopes children and teenagers will follow her lead and start putting pen to paper, as a way to cope with the ups and downs of adolescence that have been compounded by Covid-19 lockdowns and restrictions .

“Children experience scary things.

“Sitting down with a pen and putting it on a piece of paper can really help.”

There are no limits to the style or genre of the poem, with poets of all levels encouraged to submit their work and grow the region’s community of creative writers.

Poets Corner airs Sunday afternoons at 5 p.m. on Casey Radio, 97.7FM.

If you would like your work to be shared on the air, simply email poetscorner977fm@gmail.com with an audio recording of your work.

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Samara Joy sings jazz standards in style https://colinmarshallradio.com/samara-joy-sings-jazz-standards-in-style/ Wed, 09 Feb 2022 16:00:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/samara-joy-sings-jazz-standards-in-style/ Born in the Bronx, Samara Joy has musical roots through her paternal grandparents, founders of the Philadelphia-based gospel group The Savettes. Another inspiration came from her father, who toured with famed gospel artist Andraé Crouch. “Growing up, my house was always filled with music, from the sounds of my dad’s and grandparents’ songs, to many […]]]>

Born in the Bronx, Samara Joy has musical roots through her paternal grandparents, founders of the Philadelphia-based gospel group The Savettes. Another inspiration came from her father, who toured with famed gospel artist Andraé Crouch.

“Growing up, my house was always filled with music, from the sounds of my dad’s and grandparents’ songs, to many gospel and R&B artists, including Stevie Wonder, George Duke and many more,” he said. she recalls.

Joy was first introduced to jazz while attending Fordham High School for the Arts, where she performed regularly with the jazz band and eventually won Best Vocalist in an Essentially Ellington competition.

“But jazz wasn’t my real focus until I went to college at SUNY Purchase and was accepted into their acclaimed jazz program, with a faculty that includes many jazz masters. – like guitarist Pasquale Grasso and drummer Kenny Washington,” says Joy.

In college, her love of jazz was sparked by her friends.

“They were all really into jazz and shared a lot of their recordings with me. But the turning point came when I listened to Sarah Vaughan’s version of ‘Lover Man’.” And then I got addicted,” says Joy.

Joy won the 2019 Sarah Vaughan International Jazz Vocal Competition and was named a 2020 Ella Fitzgerald Fellow by the Ella Fitzgerald Charitable Foundation.

Joy has performed at many of New York’s well-known jazz venues, including The Blue Note and Dizzy’s Club Coca Cola, and has worked with some of the biggest names in jazz, including bassist Christian McBride, trumpeter Jon Faddis and the pianist Cyrus. Chestnut. Later this month she will tour Italy with pianist Emmet Cohen.

‘Stardust’ – Samara Joy – Whirlwind Sessions

Looking ahead, Joy says she would like to perform on a much bigger scale and maybe work in movies.

One of his big challenges “is getting people to understand what it (jazz) means. After all, jazz is really black American music. Jazz is part of black history, and it’s is a part of American history. It’s important music. It’s great music. And I hope I can convey that when I play.”

Joy looks forward to sharing her passionate love for jazz as a unifying force and catalyst for change in the years to come.

Hear Samara Joy sing “Moonglow” from her debut album on KNKX Midday and Evening Jazz.

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Students launch new radio show https://colinmarshallradio.com/students-launch-new-radio-show/ Thu, 03 Feb 2022 11:00:17 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/students-launch-new-radio-show/ Two Delaware Area Career Center students recently taped the first episode of “Delaware Matters,” a new show airing on My 96.7 FM, WDLR 1270 AM and CD 92.9 FM. The students, Evan Gardner and Nathan Tracy, are seniors in the DACC Digital Design program. The duo said they were approached by digital design instructor […]]]>

Two Delaware Area Career Center students recently taped the first episode of “Delaware Matters,” a new show airing on My 96.7 FM, WDLR 1270 AM and CD 92.9 FM.

The students, Evan Gardner and Nathan Tracy, are seniors in the DACC Digital Design program. The duo said they were approached by digital design instructor Josh Gallagan and asked about doing an internship for WDLR.

“We made a phone call with WDLR and it all went from there,” said Tracy, a high school student from Olentangy.

The students said the weekly show will focus on interviews with members of the community. The first episode features an interview with DACC Superintendent Jay Poroda, and it will air on February 19.

The students met Poroda in his office on Tuesday and conducted the interview, asking questions about Poroda’s first year at the career center and his goals for the future. Gardner, a student from Olentangy Liberty High School, hosted the program and Tracy set up and operated the recorder during the interview.

“I think it went well,” Tracy said, adding that he interviewed Poroda for DACC News when Poroda first joined the district last year. “It was great talking to him again. I think he’s super awesome. I think he has big visions for DACC, and he really cares.

Tracy said he did “quite a lot” of prep work to familiarize himself with the equipment before the interview.

“I’ve never done anything for a radio station before,” he said. “It was a bit difficult to ask questions and try to plan everything and how everything works. Seeing how things come together behind the scenes in radio is very interesting to learn and something that I really enjoy … The fun part is the problems. I like problem solving and trying different ways to solve. It’s a unique skill set.”

Gardner said he enjoyed the interview, adding he wasn’t nervous because he’s a musician and used to acting. He said he had done matchmaking at WDLR and had recorded commercials for them.

“I feel good about this interview,” Gardner said. “(Poroda) has a lot of potential to develop the career center.”

The students said “Delaware Matters” has no endpoint and could continue as long as the DACC and WDLR wish.

“That could eventually continue and be passed on to juniors after we graduate,” Tracy said.

Gardner said he loved being the host and would be happy to stay indefinitely.

Evan Gardner, left, and Nathan Tracy, rear, interview Delaware Area Career Center Superintendent Jay Poroda on Tuesday during the first episode of their upcoming “Delaware Matters” radio show.

Glenn Battishill can be reached at 740-413-0903 or on Twitter @BattishillDG.

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Radio Station WHMI 93.5 FM – News, Weather, Traffic, Sports, School Updates and the Best Classic Hits from Livingston County Michigan https://colinmarshallradio.com/radio-station-whmi-93-5-fm-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hits-from-livingston-county-michigan-2/ Fri, 28 Jan 2022 12:29:08 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/radio-station-whmi-93-5-fm-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hits-from-livingston-county-michigan-2/ (WASHINGTON) — The U.S. Supreme Court will once again revisit the legality of affirmative action in higher education, after last upholding decades-old precedent in 2016. On Monday, the High Court said it would take up a pair of cases challenging the use of race as a factor in undergraduate admissions at Harvard University, the nation’s […]]]>

(WASHINGTON) — The U.S. Supreme Court will once again revisit the legality of affirmative action in higher education, after last upholding decades-old precedent in 2016.

On Monday, the High Court said it would take up a pair of cases challenging the use of race as a factor in undergraduate admissions at Harvard University, the nation’s oldest private college, and at the University of North Carolina, the nation’s oldest public state university. .

The fact that the Supreme Court has agreed to hear the cases together is seen by some experts as an indication that the conservative-leaning body may be willing to review its precedents and end race-conscious admissions in education. higher – which proponents say will have wide-ranging implications for schools and beyond.

Some studies suggest that policies—which consider race as one of many factors when considering applicants to foster diversity in the student body—have had a profound effect on opportunities for minority applicants, which in turn has an impact on their chances of employment and career. And they suggest stopping them not only decreases the number of black and Latino students enrolling in colleges, but increases those of advantaged groups.

“This is a very, very significant threat to the continued constitutionality of affirmative action,” Tanya Washington, a law professor at Georgia State University whose research focuses on educational equity, told ABC News. .

Opponents — including the conservative group Students for Fair Admissions, which brought both lawsuits against the universities — have argued that the policies are discriminatory and violate students’ civil rights and the constitutional guarantee of equal protection.

Since 1978, the court has said race can be used as one factor among others in college admissions, prohibiting the use of quotas or mathematical formulas to diversify a class.

In the landmark 2003 case Grutter v. Bollinger, which the cases against Harvard and UNC seek to overturn, the court said the goal of a diverse student body justifies the use of race, as well as other factors, in admissions policies.

The court raised the bar for schools with its 2013 decision in the case of Abigail Fisher, a white woman who tried to end consideration of race in university admissions policies from Texas. In the majority view, former Justice Anthony Kennedy said institutions must first exhaust all racially neutral means to achieve racial diversity, such as recruitment and socio-economic indicators, before to consider race, Washington said.

The court last upheld affirmative action in 2016 when it considered Fisher’s case again, in a close vote that many expected at the time to upend gender-conscious admissions policies. race.

Since that ruling, the composition of the tribunal has changed in a way that suggests precedent could be overturned, according to Washington.

“The court moved to a more conservative block of judges — 6 to 3 — and I think there would be significant receptivity among that group of six to overturning Grutter v. Bollinger,” Washington said. , noting that the breakup is unlikely. change with the retirement of Justice Stephen Breyer.

With this latest case, the court could rule in a number of ways, according to Washington. It could say that using race in admissions violates the 14th Amendment’s Equal Protection Clause and overthrows Grutter, ending affirmative action. He could support Grutter and conclude that the use of race in admissions policies at Harvard and UNC was constitutional. Or he could support Grutter but find the use of race in these contexts unconstitutional.

The court could also potentially further restrict the practice or require “higher standards” for schools to use it, said Michael Olivas, holder of the William B. Bates Emeritus Professor of Law at the University of Houston Law Center, at ABC News.

The consolidation of the two cases signals to Washington that “a majority of the court may be prepared to overrule Grutter.” The fact that the court also seemed inclined to overturn another long-standing precedent in Roe v. Wade could also be pointing to the same thing here, she said.

Against the wisdom of convention at the time, Olivas said the court would uphold affirmative action in the 2016 case. He said he believed the same now, even with a different court composition.

“The world has changed, but the common law has not changed,” he said. “I hope 50 years of very clear law would hold.”
“Cataclysmic” impact

If the court ends affirmative action in higher education, the impact will be far-reaching, Washington said, because most institutions — except those in several states where it is banned from public universities — use race-conscious admissions policies.

“It won’t just impact the elite,” Washington said. “What we’re going to see, what I predict, is a cataclysmic drop in the number of Latino, Black, and Indigenous students attending institutions of higher education.”

A 2015 study published in the Journal of Higher Education that examined the impact of affirmative action bans in six states found that the share of students of color in medical schools fell after the bans took effect. .

In California, which has banned affirmative action policies at public universities in the state since 1996, education advocacy group EdSource found that there was a double-digit enrollment gap between the percentage of Latino high school graduates and those enrolled in the University of California’s 2019 freshman class. .

If Harvard were to stop considering race in its admissions process and use only race-neutral factors, the proportion of African-American students admitted to the Class of 2019 would likely have dropped from 14% to 6%. , and the proportion of Hispanic or “other” students from 14% to 9%, found a university committee. Meanwhile, “this decrease would produce a corresponding increase in the number of students of other races, primarily white students,” its report said.

Disparities in admissions have implications for those entering professional fields, such as law or medicine, as well as college professors, Washington said.

“I think it will make the quality of education less robust and less rigorous,” she said. “I think this will mean that we will also end up with fewer teachers and professionals of various races. This will have detrimental and far-reaching consequences for our society.”

For Olivas, one of the worst consequences of the potential end of affirmative action is the message it sends.

“I think this will send a signal to minority parents that their children are not wanted,” he said. “I think that would be a mistake for all of us. I want a better educated group no matter where they come from.”

Whether affirmative action is maintained or not, disparities in admissions would still exist thanks to policies such as inherited admissions, which tend to disproportionately benefit white applicants, he added.

In the case against Harvard, Students for Fair Admissions alleges that Asian American applicants were unlawfully targeted and rejected at a disproportionately higher rate, in violation of students’ constitutional rights. In the case against UNC, he alleges that the university has refused to use racially neutral alternatives to achieve the stated goal of a diverse study body.

“Every college applicant should be judged as a unique individual, not as a representative of a racial or ethnic group,” said Edward Blum, president of Students for Fair Admissions and longtime opponent of affirmative action. and conservative activist, in a statement. .

In its lawsuit against Harvard, Students for Fair Admissions also argued that racial classifications “have a stigmatizing effect” on applicants.

“Regardless of whether an African-American or Hispanic applicant is admitted to Harvard because of racial preference, so long as racial preferences exist, it will often be assumed that race is the reason for the applicant’s admission to Harvard. school,” the complaint said. . “This stigma can have a devastating effect on the psyche of impressionable students.”

In response to the Supreme Court’s ruling this week, Harvard and UNC said their admissions policies were ruled constitutional by lower courts.

“Considering race as one factor among many in admissions decisions produces a more diverse student body that strengthens the learning environment for all,” Harvard President Lawrence Bacow said in a statement.

UNC spokesperson Beth Keith said in a statement that its holistic admissions process “allows for a deliberate and thoughtful evaluation of each student.”

Many experts, including Washington, expect the Supreme Court to hear arguments in the case during its next term, which begins in October.

Copyright © 2022, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

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Announcers fired by Maine radio station for shaming female basketball players without being aware of open mic https://colinmarshallradio.com/announcers-fired-by-maine-radio-station-for-shaming-female-basketball-players-without-being-aware-of-open-mic/ Mon, 24 Jan 2022 18:57:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/announcers-fired-by-maine-radio-station-for-shaming-female-basketball-players-without-being-aware-of-open-mic/ Derogatory comments made about players’ weight during a radio station’s live broadcast of a women’s basketball game sparked outrage and resulted in the firing of two Maine broadcasters, according to reports. According to a report by the Bangor Daily News, the radio station in Houlton, Maine, has fired Jim Carter of Près Isle and Steve […]]]>

Derogatory comments made about players’ weight during a radio station’s live broadcast of a women’s basketball game sparked outrage and resulted in the firing of two Maine broadcasters, according to reports.

According to a report by the Bangor Daily News, the radio station in Houlton, Maine, has fired Jim Carter of Près Isle and Steve Shaw of Mars Hill, both Hall of Fame inductees.

As they prepared to call a women’s basketball game, the pair watched a separate women’s game between Easton and Central Aroostook on a monitor. Unaware of the existence of an open microphone, they made remarks about the weight and physical appearance of some players, the Bangor Daily News reported.

The Portland Press Herald reported that WHOU-FM owner Fred Grant fired Carter, a former coach, and Shaw, a former athletic director after they ended their broadcast of the high school basketball game in Caribou on Thursday night. Shaw and Carter had been streaming games for WHOU for about a month, Grant said.

According to the Press Herald, the pair’s derogatory comments about some players’ weight can be heard in a 40-second video posted to Twitter. With one of the broadcasters saying, “two girls here extremely overweight. Awful.” Other derogatory comments were followed by laughter.

“I started getting phone calls immediately,” Grant told the Press Herald by phone Friday morning.

Outrage also erupted on social media. The Press Herald quoted a commenter’s post on WHOU’s Facebook page, which read: “I must say I have never heard anything so unprofessional as what Jim Carter and Steve Shaw said about of a few players tonight, you should both be ashamed of yourselves and retire from high school basketball.

Grant received praise from other commenters on the station’s Facebook page for quickly firing advertisers, the Press Herald quoted.

“Thank you for doing the right thing,” one wrote. “There was no need for these on-air or off-line commentaries. The kids have enough to deal with.

USA Today reported that Grant released a public statement the next morning explaining that broadcasters Steve Shaw and Jim Carter had been fired.

Less than a week after the incident, News Center Maine reported that Shaw had retired from the Maine Basketball Hall of Fame, to which he was inducted as a “2020 Legend of the Game”. The Maine Basketball Hall of Fame accepted his withdrawal.

The Press Herald reached Carter by phone Friday afternoon. Carter expressed remorse for the incident but declined to go into specifics, saying he apologized to the school superintendent whose players he belittled.

“I don’t even know what to say. I hope everyone can get through this and be okay with it,” Carter told the Press Herald.

The Press Herald said his attempts to reach Shaw for an interview on Friday had failed.

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Summit radio station expands to Athens https://colinmarshallradio.com/summit-radio-station-expands-to-athens/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 03:24:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/summit-radio-station-expands-to-athens/ It all started on November 5, 2021: “The Summit”, also known as 91.3 WAPS-FM, extended its reach from Akron, Ohio to Athens. WAPS The Summit has a long history, dating back to 1955. The station was originally used as a learning tool and class broadcaster for public schools in Akron. In 1989, the station began […]]]>

It all started on November 5, 2021: “The Summit”, also known as 91.3 WAPS-FM, extended its reach from Akron, Ohio to Athens.

WAPS The Summit has a long history, dating back to 1955. The station was originally used as a learning tool and class broadcaster for public schools in Akron. In 1989, the station began to shift from its educational roots to an alternative music format.

For the past three decades, The Summit has broadcast its signals to the Struthers-Youngstown area of ​​Ohio and now to Athens, where it airs on 90.1 WAPS-FM. Brad Savage, program director of The Summit, says Athens’ addition to its cue is due to its notable musical roots and reputation as a college town.

“Our music format, being modern rock or an alternative type format, tends to do well in college town areas,” Savage said. “Usually it is students and graduate students, but also even professors who like our style. When this station became available that’s what really caught our attention was that even though Athens is a few hours from our home in Akron we thought that was probably a good city for the format and the kind of music we make.”

Two of The Summit’s most popular artists, CAAMP and Red Wanting Blue, went to Ohio University. The area is also known for hosting its annual Nelsonville Music Festival, an outdoor music event held at Hocking College.

“We know Athens very well, mainly because CAAMP and Red Wanting Blue, in particular, are two really big bands for the station,” Savage said.

The radio station aims to be a showcase for upcoming musicians and to expose listeners to not just a particular style or genre of music.

“The station is a showcase for local, national and international musicians, and especially for emerging artists who would otherwise be less likely to include a relatively small market like Athens or Akron on their national tours,” Tommy said. Bruno, CEO of The Summit. , said in an email. “By cultivating a vibrant music scene, the station has been recognized as one of the forces in attracting touring artists to those special areas of Ohio, like Athens.”

The opportunity to add a signal in Athens came from an existing broadcaster, Spirit Communications, which was looking to sell some of its translation signals.

The radio station offers commercial-free music and operates four channels. Le Sommet is the flagship resort; The 330 showcases the past, present, and future of Northeast Ohio music; CHILD! Radio is an online listening service for all ages; and Rock and Recovery provides a community for people struggling with addiction, trauma, and mental health issues, supporting self-motivation, sharing information and resources, and providing a sense of peace to both antenna and online.

Although The Summit plays both great artists, like the Beatles, and up-and-coming bands from Ohio, Savage hopes to include more musicians from Parkersburg, W.Va., Marietta, Ohio, and even the Columbus area. .

“The first thing we are not – The Summit is not news, sports, opinions, politics or the sale of products or services,” Bruno said in an email. “Our music and community service programming appeals to musical adventurers, those who dare to be a little different. Our listener-supported public radio station is on the left of the dial, which means that support comes from the communities we serve, thanks to donations from listeners.

The Summit has also been honored with numerous awards, including the Margaret Clark Morgan Foundation Innovation Award in 2014 and Best Radio Station by Akron Life Magazine in 2006, 2007, 2009, 2010 and 2012.

OU students are also excited about a new variety of music coming to town via the radio station.

“I think (The Summit) is cool,” said Gabriella Benington, a freshman teaching high school history. “I personally know that my car doesn’t connect to any radio stations, so I think it would be nice to have a radio station that wasn’t just 60s country music.”

@grace_koe

gk011320@ohio.edu

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