local radio – Colin Marshall Radio http://colinmarshallradio.com/ Fri, 25 Mar 2022 14:19:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://colinmarshallradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-1-1-120x120.png local radio – Colin Marshall Radio http://colinmarshallradio.com/ 32 32 How a Fisherman-Run Radio Station in South India is Changing Lives https://colinmarshallradio.com/how-a-fisherman-run-radio-station-in-south-india-is-changing-lives/ Wed, 02 Feb 2022 17:57:18 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/how-a-fisherman-run-radio-station-in-south-india-is-changing-lives/ Kadal Osai FM, run by the community, has helped to educate the people of Pamban, a small island in Tamil Nadu, and to raise social and environmental awareness. On Pamban, a small island inhabited by over 100,000 people in the southern Indian state of Tamil Nadu, Kadal Osai 90.4 FM is not just a radio […]]]>

Kadal Osai FM, run by the community, has helped to educate the people of Pamban, a small island in Tamil Nadu, and to raise social and environmental awareness.

On Pamban, a small island inhabited by over 100,000 people in the southern Indian state of Tamil Nadu, Kadal Osai 90.4 FM is not just a radio station. It is a lifeline.

Run by a dozen fishermen to empower their community – one that represents 80% of the island’s population – the radio station is the first community media initiative in India exclusively for fishermen by fishermen.

Started by a fisherman, Armstrong Fernando, about five years ago, Radio Kadal Osai (Sound of the Sea) is now a 12-member team, researching, presenting and broadcasting news to islanders.

On Pamban, people are highly dependent on the sea. They engage in fishing or tend to the tourism sector by running small hotels and driving taxis.

The 24/7 channel provides timely weather updates for those who brave the deep waters to fish the sea, warns them of inclement weather and also helps them identify potential fishing spots.

The community radio station has also helped create alternative livelihoods and raise awareness of societal issues and marine conservation.

“Our job is to protect the sea for people,” says Lenin, who works as the station’s programming coordinator.

“People here are very simple and hardworking. At first when we started the radio there was a lot of resistance to the idea. People apprehended us. But now that they have started to reap the benefits of a community media, they come to our radio station themselves and want to share their experiences,” he said. World TRT.

Prior to the establishment of Kadal Osai, the people of Pamban could only listen to the low frequencies of Ceylon Radio based in Sri Lanka, due to its proximity. India’s national public broadcaster All India Radio also lacked sufficient reach.

Kadal Osai Radio Jockey (RJ) interviews a native of Pamban Island. The 24/7 channel provides timely weather updates for anglers. ()

Sabeer, 40, who has worked as a fisherman for two decades, believes the introduction of Kadal Osai has transformed the lives of islanders.

“They share the latest information relevant to us (fishermen). We didn’t know about these things before. Important government projects and vacancies are shared, along with other information such as the location of local vaccination camps,” said said Sabeer. World TRT.

Initially, the radio station broadcast for a few hours a day, but as its popularity grew, programs had to be broadcast around the clock.

Lenin believed that people experience a sense of authenticity when information is broadcast over the airwaves.

“The radio has a great influence in the lives of the people who listen to it [compared to] Television, social networks or word of mouth. People recognize that there is little possibility of being misinformed about this medium.”

Help with marine conservation

In addition to announcements related to the welfare of fishermen and the broadcast of traditional music, the community radio also shares useful information to protect and conserve ocean resources, reporting endangered species such as sea turtles and asking fishermen to save them if they are caught in their nets.

When the Pamban fishermen deployed their nets, the turtles often got tangled with the fish. Turtle meat was commonly eaten, thus endangering rare species.

As part of a special initiative, Radio Kadal Osai has started offering fishermen INR 1,000 ($13.35) if they release trapped turtles into the ocean while capturing the moment on their phone.

“It has become a huge success. Many fishermen have sent us videos of them releasing turtles into the sea. We give them cash rewards and also announce their names on the radio. It has also helped raise awareness of the conservation of sea turtles,” said Gayathri Usman, Kadal Osai’s station manager.

The station and its awareness campaigns have also helped to curb open defecation on the island, provided sustainable fishing practices and educated fishermen about environmental pollution.

“People are no longer taking plastic bags to the sea. They are cautious and aware that sea pollution would directly affect their livelihoods,” Usman adds.

Programs on climate change, women’s empowerment, and loans and grants available to fishers were also popular.

Children on the island attend an awareness program on the radio station.

Children on the island attend an awareness program on the radio station. (Kadal Osai FM)

During the current coronavirus pandemic, the radio is also working hard to educate people on pressing issues such as vaccine hesitancy, testing and physical distancing.

“Before, people would discriminate if someone was infected with the virus. It was like a taboo. A lot of fake news had crept into people’s minds and we had to work a lot on fact-checking for them. In the end, we were successful in giving people the correct perspective,” Usman says.

The struggle for a sustainable model

While a host of such community media initiatives have been undertaken in the country, very few have matched the success of Kadal Osai.

This is largely thanks to the sustainable business model adopted by radio.

“Our trust has a building that has about 12 stores. We [are sustained by] rental income and donations from members of our trust and various male fisher associations,” says Usman.

“We also receive projects from various international organizations like UNICEF and the Ministry of Culture and the Commonwealth Educational Media Center for Asia (CEMCA) which helps us to develop continuously with the aim of continuing to work” , she adds.

Unfortunately, this has not been the case with many such local radio stations in the country.

Experts say license fraud has hampered prospects for a thriving community radio ecosystem in India.

“Ideally, a community radio should be owned by a community,” says Danish Iqbal, a radio expert and professor at the Mass Communication Research Center (MCRC) in Delhi.

“Unfortunately, in India, most community radio stations are sanctioned by government-owned educational institutions. Many licenses have also been contributed by private educational institutions on behalf of educational NGOs.”

Source: World TRT

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Trisha Kehaulani Watson: Radio station layoffs are a blow to Hawaiian music https://colinmarshallradio.com/trisha-kehaulani-watson-radio-station-layoffs-are-a-blow-to-hawaiian-music/ Sun, 16 Jan 2022 10:06:25 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/trisha-kehaulani-watson-radio-station-layoffs-are-a-blow-to-hawaiian-music/ I have a weakness for Hawaiian music. It wasn’t just my childhood music, but my grandparents loved Hawaiian music. He played all over their house every time we went to visit. It served as the base for all family gatherings. My uncle played in the Olomana band so his teammate Haunani Apoliona played my first […]]]>

I have a weakness for Hawaiian music. It wasn’t just my childhood music, but my grandparents loved Hawaiian music. He played all over their house every time we went to visit. It served as the base for all family gatherings.

My uncle played in the Olomana band so his teammate Haunani Apoliona played my first baby luau. Uncle Jerry Santos often played in our garage or in the garden of the house in which we had a paina this weekend.

These were not concerts. They were just how we celebrated. Almost everyone picked up a guitar or a ukulele. Everyone sang.

As a child, I had no idea of ​​the extraordinary nature of these regular events. I remember lying on our living room floor, with its yellow shag carpet, wearing my dad’s Country Comfort eight-track tape. Hawaiian music is the soundtrack of my life.

Hawaiian music is a big part of the fabric that makes the islands so special. He always managed to straddle worlds: he would live in backyards and still support himself by working in Waikiki or other resort areas.

The woes of the pandemic

I am now married to a Hawaiian musician, Matt Sproat, and I can say from my front row seat to this world that Covid-19 has been a devastating blow. My husband, a full time musician, was actually on tour in 2020 when the shutdowns started. He returned home worried about what the pandemic would mean.

The loss of tours, concerts and other events has been crushing for the Hawaiian music industry – not only for musicians, but also for entertainers, DJs, sound engineers and all members of this once robust industry. . Government mandates have been slow to allow live music to return, even with Covid precautions in place.

Hawaiian music stations have been a lifeline, though radio DJs have also taken a hit when big events have been canceled.

“This has been a tough year for radio announcers during the pandemic,” said veteran broadcaster Billy V. “Some have had to work remotely; meanwhile, at the radio stations themselves, what would typically be a bustling hub of activity is continually a ghost town, as minimal crews and protocols are in effect.

Last week, to the surprise of staff and the public, Summit Media, the parent company of four local radio stations – Hawaiian 105, KCCN FM 100, Power 104.3 and KRATER 96 FM – laid off 20 employees.

These included longtime radio veterans Shannon Scott, Gregg Hammer and Billy V. Station general manager Andrew Rosen and operations manager Wayne Maria were also fired. Traffic reporter Danielle Tucker was also fired.

Summit Media Layoffs Radio Veterans Danielle Tucker, Shannon Scott, Mele Apana, Lina Girl, Billy V, Iolani Palace
Radio veterans Danielle Tucker, Shannon Scott, Mele Apana, Lina Girl and Billy V pose outside Iolani Palace after being told of mass layoffs at Summit Media. Courtesy of Lina Girl and Billy V/2022

Unplanned layoffs

As their shows continue, largely with music and less banter, the layoffs have raised concerns in local and Hawaiian communities that Summit Media, which is based in Birmingham, Alabama, was giving an early signal that he might stop supporting local or Hawaiian music.

New Summit Media/Honolulu President Patti Ponimoi declined to comment on the layoffs, referring questions to the Alabama headquarters. Summit Media promised in a statement to Hawaii News Now that “it will continue the tradition of Hawaiian music and celebrate the culture.”

Summit Media provided no reason for the sudden layoffs. And it’s hard to know what the loss of so many personalities will mean or look like in the months ahead.

I couldn’t do the job. I don’t have the energy. It’s a job that requires a constant supply of energy that I would find exhausting.

“As radio personalities, we thrive on this business hub; this chance to interact physically and mentally. But when you do that remotely or virtually, it really numbs the experience,” said Billy V, who is also a regular on HNN’s ‘Sunrise’ morning show. “You try to give the best energy when you’re in the studio, and you do your best, but you always wish you could give more. The best thing though is that we continually get energy from our audience who always appreciate and give aloha back.

Local radio has been one of the few places where Hawaiian voices have consistently played a prominent role. Even though the DJs weren’t Hawaiian, Hawaiian issues and news were a constant thread. It was a space where the local culture, including the pidgin, was showcased.

Hawaiian musicians certainly have a deep appreciation for Hawaiian music radio‘s contribution to Hawaiian culture.

“Over the generations, Hawaiian music radio has always served as an important catalyst for showcasing cultural pride and identity through music and mele,” said musician and kumu hula Keali’i Reichel.

“It is the singular place on the airwaves where our collective Hawaiian communities across the pae ʻaina are able to connect, listen, sometimes engage, learn and bask in the brilliance of our kupuna. All in real time,” Reichel added. “It’s a space in which artists old and new fuse alongside the radio personalities who have kept their hand on the pulse of our lahui.”

Hawaiian music, Hawaiian voices

Reichel is right. Hawaiian music radio has always been about more than music. It has been a space where Hawaiians and Hawaiian issues have been amplified.

Much of this wealth comes from the DJs themselves; people like Billy V or Mele Apana.

“Mento” Mele Apana left Hawaiian 105 last year, but she’s a perfect example of the type of voice that’s valuable and needed on radio. She is the archetype of the “crazy tita”. She’s that crazy friend everyone has – the one who’s both outrageous and kind. And on the radio, as part of the Kolohe Crew, she became the crazy friend of all listeners and commuters.

The entire Kolohe Crew dealt with that kind of authentic local vibe – hilarious, unexpected, and real, without being offensive or mean. They were just funny and didn’t need to be at the expense of others.

Hawaiian radio has also been a space where new Hawaiian musicians have had the opportunity to be heard.

It was on Hawaiian radio that I first heard Keali’i Reichel when he released his debut album “Kawaipunahele”. Hawaiian Music Radio was where most of us first learned about new music and bands. Radio announcers are the facilitators of this growth and this process.

And while Summit Media says it remains committed to Hawaiian music and culture, it’s hard to know what it will be like without many of the personalities who have become synonymous with Hawaiian music radio in Hawaii.

Reichel sums it up perfectly: “With all the changes in Hawaiian radio over the past decade – and more recently – we hope this isn’t a harbinger of things to come.”

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Ke Buena, Spokane’s First Spanish Language Commercial Radio Station, Reflects Growing Community | Arts & Culture | Spokane | Interior of the Pacific Northwest https://colinmarshallradio.com/ke-buena-spokanes-first-spanish-language-commercial-radio-station-reflects-growing-community-arts-culture-spokane-interior-of-the-pacific-northwest/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 09:30:40 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/ke-buena-spokanes-first-spanish-language-commercial-radio-station-reflects-growing-community-arts-culture-spokane-interior-of-the-pacific-northwest/ Click to enlarge Photo of young Kwak Rafael Cárdenas interviews Latinos in Spokane co-founder Jennyfer Mesa by phone during La Voz del Pueblo. RAfael Cárdenas’ mother wanted him to be a priest, but the young boy from western Michoacán, Mexico, had other ideas. Although he was committed to serving the community and was a reader […]]]>


Click to enlarge

Photo of young Kwak

Rafael Cárdenas interviews Latinos in Spokane co-founder Jennyfer Mesa by phone during La Voz del Pueblo.

RAfael Cárdenas’ mother wanted him to be a priest, but the young boy from western Michoacán, Mexico, had other ideas. Although he was committed to serving the community and was a reader of the scriptures during Sunday mass, Cárdenas aspired to be an engineer or a similar profession.

In a way, mamá prevailed.

The best part of his job as a radio DJ is connecting and encouraging people, says Cárdenas, who has spent almost 30 years with various entirely Spanish radio stations in Tri-Cities. In July 2020, he helped launch the Spokane-based Spanish-language radio station Ke Buena and is its lead DJ.

Ke Buena is familiar for “it’s okay,” according to Ben Reed, who runs the station from his southern Idaho home and whose distinct baritone can sometimes be heard on the air.

Broadcasting on FM 95.7 and AM 1330, Ke Buena is the first truly local Spanish-language commercial radio station in the Northwest Interior, but not the first of its kind. radio station in Spokane. From 2014 to 2016, KMBI broadcast in Spanish – coincidentally on the same frequency as Ke Buena – with content sourced from its nonprofit owner, Moody Bible Institute. KMBI eventually became the rock station KYOZ, or OZ 95.7, but when that station closed in June 2020, it opened the door to new ownership and a new format.

Ke Beuna is a mix of locally produced and subscribed shows. On weekends, for example, Cárdenas welcomes La Voz del Pueblo, or “La Voix du Peuple”, from 10 am to 11 am. It is co-sponsored by two local awareness-raising organizations, Mujeres in Action (Women in Action) and the Comunidad Cristiana de Spokane Church (Christian Community of Spokane). A third of an hour is also available – free of charge – to local organizations, such as Latinos en Spokane and Spokane Association of Hispanic Business Professionals, whose message is aimed at the Spanish-speaking community.

After Cárdenas’ morning show on weekdays, Ke Buena fills the airwaves with subscribed shows. MLC Media The Numero Uno 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. is predominantly contemporary Mexican music, while from 2:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. Hispanic artist Oswaldo Diaz plays three radio personalities for Entravision’s popular comedy show called Erazno and La Chokolata.

During the day, listeners within 60 miles of the Spokane transmitter should be able to hear both FM and AM broadcasts, which are also available online at kebuena957.com. At night, Ke Buena’s AM signal and coverage drop about 10 miles in all directions.

Click to enlarge Cárdenas (left) and La Voz del Pueblo co-host Luis Hernandez - YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Photo of young Kwak

Cárdenas (left) and La Voz del Pueblo co-host Luis Hernandez

Bbefore launching Ke Buena, Reed says the research has revealed a growing Spanish-speaking market in the Northwest Interior. Census data, reports from Nielsen and other sources suggest that potentially 50,000 people within listening range of Ke Buena speak Spanish, says Reed, who grew up in Spanish in Arizona.

In many Latinx communities, radio is culturally more important than in other communities, says Reed.

“It has the same appeal as it did with the Anglos 40-50 years ago,” says Reed, who hosted a radio show while living in Argentina, and lived, taught, and graduated in theology while living in Argentina. living in Mexico, where he retains dual nationality.

“His Spanish is perfect,” Cárdenas says with awe of Reed, whom he met in 2015 when Cárdenas was DJing at a Tri-Cities station known as La Ley.

Then like today, the two men are better known by their nicknames. The reed is El Chupacabra, the mythical creature believed to suck blood (chupa) from cattle, including goats (cabras).

Cárdenas’s nickname has also been the name of his radio shows: Pichakuas, a word beyond the capabilities of Google Translate (and this writer).

Luckily, we meet at Marando’s Bar & Restaurant, where Cárdenas and a few friends await the start of the FIFA World Cup qualifiers between USA and Mexico (USA won the game). Marando co-owner Mario Ruiz provides assistance: As Cárdenas makes a jumping motion with his hand, Ruiz explains that pichakuas relates to a happy bird.

Cárdenas earned the nickname of foreman in the apple orchards of central Washington, where he had worked in the mid-1980s. He had hoped to earn enough money to return to Mexico, but instead found his voice as an advocate. Spanish speakers and culture.

He paraded with activist Cesar Chavez (Martin Luther King is another of his idols) and got involved in local radio, first as a volunteer, then as a paid DJ in 1991 with KDNA at Tri -Cities. He worked in several other stations, including La Reyna. And he talked about the treatment of undocumented workers.

“Some people are afraid to speak in public,” Cárdenas says, “but I like it.”

Thus, every morning of the week, he rises well before dawn to greet the listeners on El Show de Pichakuas, from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. It plays music and reads the weather, traffic and local headlines. He also shares a daily motivational read.

“That’s my favorite thing,” Cárdenas says. “I like helping people, raising them.” ??


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State senator dies month after telling local radio station he was sick with Covid-19 while in El Salvador https://colinmarshallradio.com/state-senator-dies-month-after-telling-local-radio-station-he-was-sick-with-covid-19-while-in-el-salvador-2/ Sun, 19 Dec 2021 03:46:55 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/state-senator-dies-month-after-telling-local-radio-station-he-was-sick-with-covid-19-while-in-el-salvador-2/ By Kay Jones, CNN Washington state senator died a month after confirming to a local radio station he was in El Salvador and sick Covid19. The family of State Senator Doug Ericksen announced his death in a statement released by the Washington State Senate Republican Caucus on Saturday, but they did not indicate the cause […]]]>


By Kay Jones, CNN

Washington state senator died a month after confirming to a local radio station he was in El Salvador and sick Covid19.

The family of State Senator Doug Ericksen announced his death in a statement released by the Washington State Senate Republican Caucus on Saturday, but they did not indicate the cause of his death.

“We are heartbroken to share that our husband and father passed away on Friday, December 17. Please keep our family in your prayers and thank you for continuing to respect our privacy at this extremely difficult time,” the statement said.

Ericksen represented the 42nd district of Whatcom County, from Bellingham to the Canadian border, according to his website. He was elected to the Senate in 2010 after serving six terms in the State House, the statement said.

Ericsen told KIRO Radio in November, he contracted the virus while in El Salvador. The station’s chief information officer said in a tweet that Ericksen told them he couldn’t leave the country and that there was no monoclonal antibody treatment available.

In an email sent to Washington state lawmakers on November 11, Ericksen said he “traveled to El Salvador and tested positive for COVID shortly after (he) arrived,” and asked for help with the treatment transported to the country to help with his recovery, according to the Seattle Times, who said he obtained the email from a member of the state Senate.

Ericksen had repeatedly called for the resignation of Democratic Governor Jay Inslee, in many messages on its website. Its latest press release, dated November 1, said the state was the “national leader of an authoritarian government.”

“Throughout this COVID situation, Inslee has been out of step with the rest of the country,” Ericksen said in the statement. “He says his act of revenge was based on science, but it is certainly not science understood by public health officials and elected leaders in every other state in the Union.”

Inslee posted a declaration Saturday in response to news of Ericksen’s death, saying he and his wife sent “our deepest condolences to the family, friends and colleagues of Senator Doug Ericksen. Our hearts are with them.

The-CNN-Wire
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“It’s a Wonderful Life: The Radio Show” https://colinmarshallradio.com/its-a-wonderful-life-the-radio-show/ Sat, 04 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/its-a-wonderful-life-the-radio-show/ GROSSE POINTE, MI (WXYZ) – An adaptation of the beloved holiday movie, It’s a Wonderful Life by Marty Bufalini – The radio show is the December production of the Grosse Pointe Theater that is sure to bring joy to Holidays and inspiration to audiences of all ages. The production will take place December 10-19 at […]]]>


GROSSE POINTE, MI (WXYZ) – An adaptation of the beloved holiday movie, It’s a Wonderful Life by Marty Bufalini – The radio show is the December production of the Grosse Pointe Theater that is sure to bring joy to Holidays and inspiration to audiences of all ages.

The production will take place December 10-19 at the Charles A. Parcells Middle School Auditorium, 20600 Mack Ave., Vernier Rd. In Grosse Pointe Woods, MI and will feature several local radio and television personalities who will serve as announcers. of celebrities during performances. This unique production incorporates vintage music and live sound effects throughout the play, including the sound effects gate once used in the Detroit live radio show of “The Lone Ranger” aired on WXYZ radio. from 1933 to 1954.

It’s a Wonderful Life, considered one of the greatest movies of all time, is the story of Geoge Bailey who spent his life serving others in the small town of Bedford Falls. One Christmas Eve, facing a major crisis, George’s discouragement reaches an all-time high and he feels his life is worthless. It takes Clarence, an angel who works to earn his wings, to show George what an incredible difference his life makes in the lives of others. The theme of this beloved classic still resonates today.

Detroit media serving as celebrity announcers during performances will include Alicia Smith, morning anchor, WXYZ-TV Detroit on Sunday, December 19, at 2 p.m. Following the 2 p.m. morning performances on December 12, 18 and 19, there will be a special behind-the-scenes Talkback session where members of the audience will have the opportunity to ask questions regarding the production, recreation of the sound effects. old radio, which inspired this adaptation, and more.

Tickets are $ 30 and can be purchased at gpt.org/wonderful or by calling the box office at 313-881-4004.


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‘Billie the Brownie’ Holiday Radio Show Still Holds Hot Spot for Milwaukeeans | WUWM 89.7 FM https://colinmarshallradio.com/billie-the-brownie-holiday-radio-show-still-holds-hot-spot-for-milwaukeeans-wuwm-89-7-fm/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/billie-the-brownie-holiday-radio-show-still-holds-hot-spot-for-milwaukeeans-wuwm-89-7-fm/ Editor’s Note: This story originally aired on May 21, 2021. It’s not quite vacation time, but for people who grew up in Milwaukee between the 1930s and 1950s, Billie the Brownie is a familiar character. Milwaukee County Historical Society / Billie the Brownie in Joyland. For more than 20 years, families gathered around their radios […]]]>


Editor’s Note: This story originally aired on May 21, 2021.

It’s not quite vacation time, but for people who grew up in Milwaukee between the 1930s and 1950s, Billie the Brownie is a familiar character.

Milwaukee County Historical Society

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Billie the Brownie in Joyland.

For more than 20 years, families gathered around their radios during the holidays to listen to the Billie the brownie show, starring Billie, Santa Claus and Captain Larry.

Mary Pat Vigil, who grew up in Northwestern Milwaukee in the 1950s, remembers anticipating every broadcast with her siblings. She was the youngest of three.

“We would be sitting at our kitchen table, but we knew Billie the brownie would arrive at a certain time, so we would finish our dinner and run on the radio. And I still imagine, she said, whoever got there first, we had a little chair and just a little chair, so whoever got there first got the chair. But otherwise, we would sit on the floor and glue our ears to the radio. “

Mary Pat says it was like a storytelling session. His memories of Billie the brownie radio show urged her to submit this question to Bubbler talk:

Was Billie the Brownie a local radio show in the early 1950s or was it a national radio show?

Well the short answer is Billie the brownie was not broadcast nationally. It was broadcast locally and the show was very popular here in Milwaukee.

The Schuster Department Store featured the character of Billie the Brownie in 1927 to promote its annual Christmas Parade. Billie was based on Palmer Cox’s Scottish folk characters called “Brownies”. They are small people like elves invisible to humans.

Attendance at Schuster’s Christmas parade was low, so management decided to create a radio show with Billie starring. The 15-minute show aired Monday through Friday and Sunday from 1931 to 1955.

Billie Radio Show Ad.jpg

Milwaukee County Historical Society

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Original advertisement for the radio show.

Ben Barbera, curator of the Milwaukee County Historical Society, says the Billie the brownie The show was the highlight of the Christmas season for many Milwaukee children.

“So Schuster’s holiday parade was always the first Saturday after Thanksgiving, and they started to organize the Billie the brownie show about 10 days before that. And so, the first 10 days of this show, it would tell about Santa’s trip to Milwaukee for the parade and there would always be some sort of disaster, whether it was a storm or a sick reindeer or something dramatic would happen ” , he explains. .

Ben says that once Santa arrived for the parade, the show continued until Christmas Eve.

Billie has also read letters from children to Santa and news on the air. Ben says Santa Claus received 50,000 to 70,000 letters a year. In 1947, they received 100,000.

When the Billie the brownie the radio show ended in 1955, Billie took a trip around the world – so the story goes. He returns under new management.

An original Billie the Brownie doll (left) with a later and updated version of Billie (right).

Milwaukee County Historical Society

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An original Billie the Brownie doll (left) next to an updated version of the character (right).

“Gimbels acquired Schuster’s in 1961 and all rights to Billie the Brownie in the process, then in 1973 Gimbels decided to bring Billie the Brownie back. They kind of recreated Billie, they made her a lot cuter as a girl. sort of pixie like character – more like what we might think of as an elf, ”he says.

But Billie did not return to the radio. Ben says Gimbels thought the radio would not have reach and that the television was too expensive. So Billie mostly appeared in print ads, and if he was in person, a teenager would dress like him.

Gimbels donated his Billie the Brownie collection to the Milwaukee County Historical Society in 1984.

Ben says he thinks the Billie the brownie The show was popular because it took off as the popularity of radio increased, and during its airing, it made people feel good during tough times in the United States, like the Great Depression and the Great Depression. Second World War.

He says Billie the Brownie hit a good spot for people.

Have a question you would like WUWM to answer? Submit your query below.
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Song from Algerian radio show highlights plight of Christian minorityGlobal Voices https://colinmarshallradio.com/song-from-algerian-radio-show-highlights-plight-of-christian-minorityglobal-voices/ https://colinmarshallradio.com/song-from-algerian-radio-show-highlights-plight-of-christian-minorityglobal-voices/#respond Sun, 31 Oct 2021 12:35:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/song-from-algerian-radio-show-highlights-plight-of-christian-minorityglobal-voices/ Algeria’s Christian minority faces discrimination and prosecution amid growing fundamentalism and the government’s failure to enforce religious equality. its file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution license This article was originally published on October 22, 2021 by Raseef22, an independent media platform. An edited version is republished here, as part of a content sharing […]]]>


Algeria’s Christian minority faces discrimination and prosecution amid growing fundamentalism and the government’s failure to enforce religious equality. its file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution license

This article was originally published on October 22, 2021 by Raseef22, an independent media platform. An edited version is republished here, as part of a content sharing agreement.

Christians in Algeria are caught in a new crisis, which many see as a reflection of the intolerance with which the Algerian state treats Christians and their beliefs.

This latest stalemate began when a morning show on Constantine Public Radio aired the song “Eid al-Layl” (Night of the Feast) by famous singer Fayrouz, which had a line that read, “Jesus visited at night. .. Jesus colored the night. ” Shortly after, the director of the radio, Mourad Boukerzaza, was dismissed from his post after being indicted for broadcasting songs and hymns glorifying the Christian religion.

The announcement of his dismissal triggered a uproar on the pages of social networks, between those who oppose what they consider to be an increasingly “Daesh-type” country, and those who are in favor of the fight against religious proselytism.

These angry reactions were followed by the Algerian Public Radio (EPRS) denying any connection between the dismissal of the director of the radio and the broadcast of Christian hymns. He revealed that Mourad had been dismissed from his post for purely administrative reasons.

Apart from the government’s statement, the marginalization of Algerian Christians has worsened in recent years, with many hiding their faith and beliefs from their colleagues for fear of persecution.

The fall of grace

Although the arrival of Christianity in Algeria occurred in Roman times, its modern revival came in the hands of European immigrants in the 19th century. These European newcomers built churches, schools and health centers, which led a number of Algerian Muslims to convert to Christianity, especially in the northern region of Berber-speaking Kabylia.

Meanwhile, Catholic Christians of European descent had the best chances of securing high-level government posts, as well as seizing a significant chunk of Algeria’s economy.

The independence of Algeria on July 5, 1962 marked the end of the golden age of Christians in the country. Statistics indicate that Christians at that time made up over 12 percent of the country’s population, but after independence up to 800,000 Christian settlers were evacuated to France; 200,000 have decided to stay in Algeria.

Over time, with increasing restrictions which then turned violent, the percentage of Christians in Algeria fell to just 1% of the population.

Target Christians

As Islamists gained a foothold in Algeria and Salafist tendencies spread throughout the country, not only Christian property was threatened, but their lives as well: Christian clergy began to be the target of extremists.

In 1962, the Oran massacre claimed the lives of 95 people, most of them of European descent. In 1996, seven monks from Tibhirine were kidnapped in Algeria and murdered by the Armed Islamic Group (GIA). The same year, an explosion targeted the car of the Bishop of Oran, Pierre Claverie, instantly killing him and his driver.

It is not only Islamic fundamentalism that has targeted Christians in Algeria; the state itself, through its various regimes, has played an undeniable role in stifling and restricting them.

According to the 2018 report of the United States Commission on International Religious Freedom, Christians in Algeria were subjected to state repression which resulted in the closure of more than a dozen churches in 2017, and other closures continued the following year. To date, these churches have not been reopened, and in June, the commission recommended that Algeria be placed on the State Department’s watch list.

These successive blows were mainly directed against the Protestant denomination of Christianity, which some argue is due to the fact that, unlike the Catholic Church, which enjoys strong protection from Europe, the Protestant Church n has no support.

A problem of proselytism

For their part, the greatest justification offered by the Algerian authorities for the closure of churches is to prevent the proselytism and evangelization that they accuse of leading these churches.

Speaking to Algerian newspaper ElChorouk El Yawmi in October 2019, the governor of Tizi Ouzou said he had decided to close a church following complaints from a citizen about his suspicious activity. Some reports indicate that in 2015 the number of Algerians converted to Christianity exceeded 380,000, most of them from the Kabylia region.

In 2019, Sarah Leah Whitson, then director of the Middle East and North Africa division at Human Rights Watch, commented on the shutdown in an official statement:

The Algerian authorities should grant religious minorities the same freedom to practice their faith as the Muslim majority. All churches that have been arbitrarily closed should be allowed to reopen.

Algerian Minister of Religious Affairs Mohamed Issa has denied accusations that his country persecutes minorities. He said the buildings that were closed were originally educational institutions, homes or shops with legally permitted activities, but had been turned into places of worship without proper permission.

Hide Christian Identity

A young Algerian Christian, who requested anonymity, told Raseef22: “I encountered many obstacles. It is very difficult to tell people in Algeria that I am a Christian.

He explained that the experience of Christians in the country varies by region: “The more the region is inhabited by those who do not accept any difference or dissimilarity in their surroundings, the greater the danger and threat. Having lived in four different provinces, he could attest that the capital was by far the best in terms of hospitality and religious tolerance. As for living in one of Algeria’s city centers, he remembers it as a bitter experience: “I was threatened and strangers demanded that I convert to Islam to ensure my own. security. […] it was a terrible experience for me.

Commenting on the situation of Christians, Algerian researcher based in Cairo, Aziza Saadoun, told Raseef22:

The depth of the crisis is linked to the Algerian character and identity who, to a large extent, do not know the culture of diversity or difference, and it is difficult for him to accept the other.

She added that the growth of Islamic fundamentalist movements and the state’s vision of Christian churches as operators have together contributed to the creation of this Algerian identity, the result of which has been the marginalization of minorities and the denial of most basic rights.



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Hip-hop radio station refines local focus – Business Journal Daily https://colinmarshallradio.com/hip-hop-radio-station-refines-local-focus-business-journal-daily/ https://colinmarshallradio.com/hip-hop-radio-station-refines-local-focus-business-journal-daily/#respond Fri, 29 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/hip-hop-radio-station-refines-local-focus-business-journal-daily/ YOUNGSTOWN, Ohio – In an age when most radio stations rely more on pre-recorded broadcasts, Loud 102.3-FM takes the opposite approach. The Youngstown-based hip-hop station fills most of its slots with local personalities and keeps the boots on the pitch with local appearances that make it a trusted friend to listeners. Since last summer, its […]]]>


YOUNGSTOWN, Ohio – In an age when most radio stations rely more on pre-recorded broadcasts, Loud 102.3-FM takes the opposite approach.

The Youngstown-based hip-hop station fills most of its slots with local personalities and keeps the boots on the pitch with local appearances that make it a trusted friend to listeners.

Since last summer, its team of owners is also predominantly local. The station is now run by Charles Colvin, aka DJ Chip Banks, whose role expanded when the other managing owner, Pat Cerullo of Reading, Pa., Sold his share.

Loud-FM aired in 2019, becoming the first hip-hop station in the Mahoning Valley.

It has six employees, including program director Gabe Carrillo. His studio is located on the ground floor of the Amedia Tower, in the city center.

The local entertainment team includes Vel, Justin Luvv, DJ Maze Faze and Colvin himself. There are also a few syndicated shows, including DeDe in the Morning and DJ Grooves, which is actually Cerullo.

The letters of appeal for Loud 102.3 are WLOA, which is licensed in Farrell, PA. Its air footprint encompasses the areas of Youngstown, Warren and Sharon, stretching beyond urban areas on both sides of the state border for approximately 20 miles. It can also be streamed online.

Colvin, a Youngstown native who started out as a DJ at a club before becoming an on-air host at another local radio station, is the sales manager for Loud, while Carrillo oversees programming and operations. daily.

“Day-to-day management, I’m here and Gabe is here, and we’re hip when it comes to what we do in this market,” Colvin said.

Loud has already hosted some signature annual events he produces, including the annual Juneteenth celebration, backpack giveaways with school supplies, a Halloween trunk or treat, and health information.

Hip-hop has become an established radio format only in recent years, and Loud now has several competitors in the market, including Real 95.9-FM, which is owned by industry heavyweight iHeart Media.

Colvin enjoys competition, smiling when he talks about this rare opportunity to build a new station.

“This is one of my most exciting endeavors,” he says. “I wanted to be able to sit down at the property level table and organize the plans for the future.”

Colvin and his staff are developing several new community initiatives and events to anchor their local and local approach.

The other side of their strategy is to have local sportspeople talk about issues that matter to listeners, whether urban or suburban.

“This is how we became the favorite in the region,” says Covin. “We do not flood the airwaves with [pre-recorded] programming god knows where. It’s super local, and we show up in the community, give gifts, support families for the holidays. The community can feel our presence here. We don’t just broadcast and collect dollars.

Colvin adds that his staff forge just as close ties with advertisers. “We know them personally and support their businesses,” he says.

While Loud seems to be going against the grain of the industry trend, Colvin is the only way for a startup to gain a foothold in the market.

“Even those stations which [are now using off-site recorded programming] started with a local presence, ”he says. “Think of car dealerships. So that local talent can talk about you [on the air] goes a long way.

In radio, the measure of success is in sales, and the number of listeners is usually determined by rating services. But director Carrillo says the results can be seen in other ways.

Originally from California who served as a program director in Milwaukee, upstate New York, Vermont and most recently in Canton, he says the Youngstown-Warren-Sharon market is a unique opportunity.

“The challenges are the fun part,” he says. “Youngstown is not a flooded market. We have a small core of strong stations. Loud occupies a unique position among them and has people with a wide variety of radio experiences.

He admits that there are “growing pains” associated with competing with larger stations that offer lower advertising rates. “But we have a great ability to connect with our audience in ways that our competitors can’t,” he said.

Carrillo doesn’t rely solely on Nielsen’s books to prove the commercial viability of his station.

“I know it’s a default statement if your grades aren’t good,” he says. “But the reality is that ratings are also a business. You spend $ 15,000 a year to be told you’re the fifth or sixth best, or maybe the best resort on the market … [advertising sales] agencies and they love those numbers. But Chip has done a great job leading the charge, making sure all team members are rooted in our advertisers. “

He loves Loud’s position in the market and sees an even brighter future.

“In the future, small operators like us will focus on the one station we have, instead of letting it feed it. [a national radio chain], which just uses syndication numbers to feed New York, Chicago, and LA… we see success when we walk into a business client’s office and they invite us into their building. Or when we go from hosting an event on June 15 from a dozen vendors in year one to 50 in year two. That’s what a market like Youngstown needs in a radio station. More than music.

To make his point clear, Carrillo holds up his cell phone. “I have all the songs ever recorded here,” he says. “So what’s the difference between that and what we’re doing? They are people like Chip.

Carrillo says agency advertisers also appreciate the reach of Loud 102.3 in the minority community. “We have locals who can do live readings [on the air] and have personalities related to their products, ”he says. “You reach more of your audience on a local show than on a mass show. “

As an example, Colvin points out that when COVID-19 hit, his station was the first to receive and share public service announcements from the Centers for Disease Control.

“It was about ‘who’s a local voice’,” he says. “This is the brand that we are building. We are a means of reaching that market for people who are outside the market.

Colvin says the fierce bond with the community has helped his station weather the downturn caused by the pandemic.

“It has helped us stay afloat where others [radio station] the clusters had time off, ”he says. “Wd didn’t get the numbers we might have had in a perfect year, but it wasn’t a bad year.”

For Colvin, owning and managing a radio station is the natural extension of a life of music.

The 2005 Wilson High School graduate said his house was the neighborhood home with the big stereo.

“My dad loved ’90s rap and my mom loved’ 90s R&B, and it all shaped my childhood,” he says. “I played drums at church and was on the drums line at school. In seventh grade I auditioned and joined the Warren Junior Military Band and we toured the country.

After high school, Colvin began translating his formal musical training into doing hip-hop. He started producing and creating music, then became a DJ at live events and in clubs.

“I was DJing all over town and I’m the official track and field DJ for Youngstown State University,” he says. Colvin graduated in Information Technology from YSU.

From DJing, Colvin made the natural leap to radio.

When Pat Cerullo of Reading, Pa., Sought to expand his station group in Youngstown, he tracked down Colvin – who he was told he knew about this market – to launch Loud 102.3-FM.

Colvin made it clear from the start that he would only come on board if he had capital in the business. Cerullo finally agreed and Colvin’s managerial career had begun.

This summer, Cerullo sold its stake in the station to Loud so it could focus on its other station properties in eastern Pennsylvania.

Now Colvin uses Loud-102.3 FM. He’s also part of the resort’s umbrella company, which includes other investors.

“It’s hard to start a business in Youngstown if you’re not already part of the community,” he says. “My business connections and my concern for the community have helped me capitalize on my participation in this business.”

Pictured: Charles Colvin in one of the DJ booths at Loud 102.3 in downtown Youngstown.

Copyright 2021 The Business Journal, Youngstown, Ohio.


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South Florida Radio Station Celebrates 20 Years of Music, Empowerment and Unity https://colinmarshallradio.com/south-florida-radio-station-celebrates-20-years-of-music-empowerment-and-unity/ https://colinmarshallradio.com/south-florida-radio-station-celebrates-20-years-of-music-empowerment-and-unity/#respond Thu, 28 Oct 2021 23:26:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/south-florida-radio-station-celebrates-20-years-of-music-empowerment-and-unity/ WEST PALM BEACH, Fla .– You’ve heard the phrase “A Voice for the Radio”. A local radio station gives the phrase a very different meaning. Hubbard Radio’s WMBX X102.3 Today’s R&B and flashbacks have been a voice for social issues and underserved communities. This month the station turned 20. And Thursday morning, they celebrated their […]]]>


WEST PALM BEACH, Fla .– You’ve heard the phrase “A Voice for the Radio”. A local radio station gives the phrase a very different meaning. Hubbard Radio’s WMBX X102.3 Today’s R&B and flashbacks have been a voice for social issues and underserved communities.

This month the station turned 20. And Thursday morning, they celebrated their birthday with 102 listeners. It is a radio station that is used to making announcements and queues of people answering.

“They care, they give back to the community and to people like me,” said Meka Robinson, X102.3 auditor. “We trust them because they empower us. “

“We say we support the community – but we focus on unity,” added Jasmine Lewis, X102.3 Promotions Manager.

WPTV

In tribute to listeners who made 20 years possible, the station offered free gasoline Thursday morning to 102 listeners. But DJs like DJ Reggie Dee have bigger appearances planned during their week.

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WPTV

“Tomorrow I start my day by sitting down and talking to the kids at the juvenile detention center,” Dee said. “We’re using our platform in the right way – so it’s important for us to give back to our community. “

In fact, DJs like Dee were actively out of the studio talking about issues like race relations and the police before George Floyd’s death.

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“We have a platform. It’s our job to magnify and amplify that message, ”said DJ Don Chris, DJ and X102.3 Content Director. “This is what we are committed to.

DJ Don Chris said that after Floyd’s death they broke the format.

“We had the police chiefs and the Urban League,” he said.

The topics do not end there. Domestic violence, homelessness and youth empowerment are just a few of the issues addressed on air and outside the studio.

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“The people at this station have a heart in serving this community,” said Melissa Fiacco, COO of 411 PAIN. “What (people) need most right now is hope.”

“We are in 2021, things are happening and we kind of want to embrace the whole concept of unity”,

“I think it’s important that the audience hears our passion on air, but I also think it’s important that they see us in the community as well,” added Chris. “Seen and heard. “


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A1E Radio Program Improves Health Information Against COVID-19 https://colinmarshallradio.com/a1e-radio-program-improves-health-information-against-covid-19-2/ https://colinmarshallradio.com/a1e-radio-program-improves-health-information-against-covid-19-2/#respond Mon, 25 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/a1e-radio-program-improves-health-information-against-covid-19-2/ Atimonan One Energy, Inc. (A1E) continues to support the local government of Atimonan in its fight against the COVID-19 pandemic. Beyond providing material and financial assistance, the company recognizes the importance of ensuring that the people of Atimonan are well informed about the global health crisis, especially amid the spread of fake news. As health […]]]>


Atimonan One Energy, Inc. (A1E) continues to support the local government of Atimonan in its fight against the COVID-19 pandemic. Beyond providing material and financial assistance, the company recognizes the importance of ensuring that the people of Atimonan are well informed about the global health crisis, especially amid the spread of fake news. As health is one of the pillars of A1E’s corporate social responsibility (CSR) program, the company has partnered with a local radio station for a health education program called “Kaisa sa Kalusugan”.

The program features visiting health experts discussing relevant and timely health-related information, which is very important now as the world continues to fight the pandemic. Launched at the beginning of the year, Kaisa sa Kalusugan, is broadcast every Sunday morning via Radyo Natin Atimonan 106.5, which reaches more than 50% of Atimonan barangays. The program is also broadcast on the Facebook page of the A1E community. Atimonan municipal health worker Dr Richard Argulla recognized the importance of the radio program to the government’s COVID-19 information, education and communication (IEC) efforts. “The weekly radio show has helped disseminate health information, provide convenient treatment and prevent various diseases relevant to the ongoing pandemic,” said Dr Argulla. Since its launch, Kaisa sa Kalusugan has presented discussions on COVID-19 and the vaccination program; oral health; eye care; family planning; nutrition; teenage pregnancy; Mental Health; vaccination of children; and the importance of breastfeeding. The company aims to continue this IEC campaign even after the pandemic. Listeners can expect more interesting and relevant discussions about drugs and alcohol; sports and other fitness programs, and relevance of PhilHealth in future episodes.

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