los angeles – Colin Marshall Radio http://colinmarshallradio.com/ Fri, 25 Mar 2022 14:15:19 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://colinmarshallradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-1-1-120x120.png los angeles – Colin Marshall Radio http://colinmarshallradio.com/ 32 32 Missouri radio station still airs Kremlin programming, even as Russia invades Ukraine https://colinmarshallradio.com/missouri-radio-station-still-airs-kremlin-programming-even-as-russia-invades-ukraine/ Wed, 16 Mar 2022 10:18:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/missouri-radio-station-still-airs-kremlin-programming-even-as-russia-invades-ukraine/ Tune in to 11:40 a.m. or 102.9 FM in Kansas City and you might hear Jarmarl Thomas pontificate about the motives behind the Russian invasion of Ukraine on his show Fault Lines. The week of March 7, Thomas spent much of the three-hour show painting Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy as the instigator of the Russian […]]]>

Tune in to 11:40 a.m. or 102.9 FM in Kansas City and you might hear Jarmarl Thomas pontificate about the motives behind the Russian invasion of Ukraine on his show Fault Lines.

The week of March 7, Thomas spent much of the three-hour show painting Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy as the instigator of the Russian invasion, blaming the Ukrainians and the United States.

“Zelenskyy is not the overflowing, brilliant hero that the West made him out to be,” Thomas said. “It’s the narrative that’s needed to solidify that idea, it’s unprovoked.”

Fault Lines is a show featured on Radio Sputnik, broadcast programming produced in Washington DC and funded by the Kremlin. The show airs regularly on KCXL, a small station in Liberty, Missouri, which can be heard for miles in all directions.

Radio Sputnik’s account of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine stands in stark contrast to most reporting on the ongoing conflict, portrayed largely as an unprovoked attack on Ukrainians led by Russian President Vladimir Putin.

KCXL and Washington DC station WZHF-AM Air Radio Sputnik daily. A handful of other stations also pick up these broadcasts.

    Pete Schartel says he fulfilled a childhood dream when he bought his first <a class=radio station in 1994.” srcset=”https://npr.brightspotcdn.com/dims4/default/1dd37ae/2147483647/strip/true/crop/1760×1174+0+0/resize/1760×1174!/quality/90/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fnpr.brightspotcdn.com%2F24%2Fe5%2Fb847ab804754a94ddce5eea1bf69%2Fschartel-sputnik-haxel.jpg 2x” width=”880″ height=”587″ src=”https://npr.brightspotcdn.com/dims4/default/e5757e3/2147483647/strip/true/crop/1760×1174+0+0/resize/880×587!/quality/90/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fnpr.brightspotcdn.com%2F24%2Fe5%2Fb847ab804754a94ddce5eea1bf69%2Fschartel-sputnik-haxel.jpg” loading=”lazy” bad-src=”data:image/svg+xml;base64,PHN2ZyB4bWxucz0iaHR0cDovL3d3dy53My5vcmcvMjAwMC9zdmciIHZlcnNpb249IjEuMSIgaGVpZ2h0PSI1ODdweCIgd2lkdGg9Ijg4MHB4Ij48L3N2Zz4=”/>

Pete Schartel says he fulfilled a childhood dream when he bought his first radio station in 1994.

As the Russian invasion of Ukraine rages on, scrutiny from Kremlin-sponsored media like Radio Sputnik continues to intensify. And for KCXL owner Pete Schartel, that scrutiny comes in the form of renewed pressure to stop airing programs that keep the radio station going.

Since the beginning of the Russian invasion, companies around the world have regularly ceased their relations with Russia. Roku and DirecTV last week, Russian state-controlled RT, formerly known as Russia Today, was dropped. This prompted RT to close its US branch and lay off most US staff.

In Russia, outlets like CNN and the New York Times withdraw journalists from the country following a censorship law signed by Putin that threatens up to 15 years in prison for spreading “false information”.

“Extremely Unusual”

Earlier this month, in response to the invasion, National Association of Broadcasters (NAB) chief executive Curtis LeGeyt called on all U.S. broadcasters to cease all state-sponsored programming with ties to the Russian government.

NAB’s chief legal officer, Rick Kaplan, said the move was “extremely unusual” but necessary.

He said the broadcasts produced by Radio Sputnik amounted to nothing more than propaganda that disseminated misinformation from a foreign government about the invasion of the United States.

“It’s different from the discourse, which is very important to have — open, all points of view on the table. There’s a line between that and direct propaganda.”

Rick Kaplan, National Association of Broadcasters

“[There’s] there’s a lot of misinformation going on, generally speaking, in our country and around the world – I think that’s an important statement.

Schartel called NAB’s request a “gut reaction” that trampled on KCXL’s freedom of speech and led to a maelstrom of angry calls to the station, calling Schartel and his wife Jonne “traitors.”

“If I did (cut the program), we would be doing exactly the main thing that we criticize the former Soviet Union and other communist regimes for doing where they don’t allow free speech,” Schartel said. .

And it’s not just free speech that worries Schartel. He said that without the monthly revenue from the deal with Radio Sputnik, the station would probably not be able to stay open.

In exchange for airing Radio Sputnik’s programs, Schartel earns $5,000 a month to air six hours of Radio Sputnik in two blocks, 6 a.m. to 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. daily at 11:40 a.m. 102.9 FM and 104.7 FM.

“Something We Could Live With”

Ahead of the 2020 deal with the Russian government, Schartel said he was struggling to keep his small radio station on the air on a shoestring budget.

“It felt like something we could live with,” Schartel said. “Especially if they could pay us and keep the rest of the station on the air.”

U.S. Justice Department Foreign Agents Registration Act (FARA) filings show RM Broadcasting paid Schartel’s company more than $160,000 to carry Radio Sputnik programming over the past two years .

Arnold Ferolito of Florida-based RM Broadcasting brokered the deal between Rossiya Segodnya, a Kremlin-run media agency in Russia, and KCXL in 2020.

In 2017, Ferlito brokered a similar deal with WZHF-AM and unsuccessfully purchased programming from stations in larger markets like New York and Los Angeles.

Two years later, as investigations continued into foreign influence in the 2016 election, the Justice Department ordered Ferolito to register as a foreign agent with FARA.

Congress first passed FARA in 1938 to combat Nazi propaganda in the run-up to World War II.

At the time, Ferolito told KCUR 89.3 that he was a businessman “caught in the middle of a political problem.” He fought the Justice Department’s order in court without success.

After U.S. District Court Judge Robin L. Rosenberg upheld the ruling, the Justice Department said in a statement that the information Ferolito and RM Broadcasting transmitted to the U.S. airwaves lacked transparency.

“The American people have a right to know if a foreign flag is flying behind speech broadcast in the United States,” the statement said. “Our concern is not the content of the speech but the transparency of the true identity of the speaker.

Yet Ferolito continues to profit from the agreements between Rossiya Segodnya and the radio stations, as long as the stations continue to broadcast Radio Sputnik. According to documents filed by FARA, Ferolito earned a small percentage of the more than $1.6 million the Russian government paid to KCXL and WZFH.

Ferolito did not give an interview to the Midwest Newsroom, but in a statement, RM Broadcasting “stands with Ukraine and the victims of oppression and aggression around the world” and argued that shutting down Radio Sputnik’s programming in the United States would be a blow to freedom of expression.

“Alternative Radio”

Radio Sputnik isn’t the only controversial programming on KCXL, due to what Schartel has said is his love of “alternative radio.”

KCXL also airs TruNews, a show The Anti-Defamation League says regularly features anti-Semitic, Islamophobic and anti-LGBTQ messages and in 2018 Schartel gave airtime to Steve West, a Clay County Republican candidate for the Missouri House of Representatives who was denounced by his party and family for espousing bigotry.

The station has supporters like Kevin Phillips, a KCXL listener for 20 years.

The self-proclaimed conspiracy researcher said he was listening because Schartel airs programs that other stations avoid.

“Whenever people tried to get their news out there and couldn’t be heard anywhere else, he (Pete) would give them space on the air,” Phillips said. “Pete never limited the topics.”

Phillips said he gets a good deal of his news from sources such as Radio Sputnik and RT. He said he didn’t mind the Russian programming funding.

“If you’ve been following Ukraine’s history for 20 years like me, you’ll find a lot more truth on Russian pay radio than on American radio,” Phillips said.

Schartel plans to continue broadcasting Radio Sputnik shows for as long as they are available, but his contract with RM Broadcasting and Rossiya Segodnya ends in December 2022. He does not expect it to be renewed.

This story comes from the Midwest Newsroom, an investigative reporting collaboration including IPR, KCUR 89.3, Nebraska Public Media News, St. Louis Public Radio and NPR.

Copyright 2022 KCUR 89.3

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Radio Station WHMI 93.5 FM – News, Weather, Traffic, Sports, School Updates and the Best Classic Hits from Livingston County Michigan https://colinmarshallradio.com/radio-station-whmi-93-5-fm-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hits-from-livingston-county-michigan-4/ Wed, 09 Feb 2022 01:15:57 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/radio-station-whmi-93-5-fm-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hits-from-livingston-county-michigan-4/ Lucas Ninno/Getty Images (NEW YORK) — As the COVID-19 pandemic has swept the world, more than 5.7 million people have died from the disease worldwide, including more than 908,000 Americans, according to compiled real-time data. by the Center for Systems Science and Systems at Johns Hopkins University. Engineering. About 64.2% of the population in the […]]]>
Lucas Ninno/Getty Images

(NEW YORK) — As the COVID-19 pandemic has swept the world, more than 5.7 million people have died from the disease worldwide, including more than 908,000 Americans, according to compiled real-time data. by the Center for Systems Science and Systems at Johns Hopkins University. Engineering.

About 64.2% of the population in the United States is fully vaccinated against COVID-19, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Latest headlines:
-Daily cases below 300,000 for the 1st time this year
-Omicron is estimated at 96.4% of new cases
-Michigan closes bridge to Canada amid trucker-led protests
-Oregon will lift mask mandates for indoor public spaces and schools by March 31

Here’s how the news evolves. All times Eastern.

February 08, 7:32 p.m.
Boston mayor sets out guidelines to drop vaccine proof requirement

Boston Mayor Michelle Wu outlined plans to drop evidence of the city’s vaccine requirement at indoor businesses, including bars, movie theaters and restaurants.

The city must have fewer than 200 COVID-19 hospitalizations per day, 95% of intensive care beds must be free, and the community positivity rate must be below 5%, before the requirement is removed, he said. she stated.

“The quickest way to ensure that we ease pressure on hospital capacity and reduce community positivity is to continue filling the gaps with vaccination and boosters,” Wu said in a statement.

There are no immediate plans to end the city’s mask mandate in schools, she added.

ABC News’ Arielle Mitropoulos

February 08, 7:20 p.m.
LA County maintains mask mandate for schools

While California Governor Gavin Newsom announced on Monday that he would end the statewide mask mandate next week, Los Angeles County health officials said on Tuesday that they had no immediate plans to drop their mask mandate.

Los Angeles County Health Department Director Dr. Barbara Ferrer told reporters that the county’s decision will be made based on whether the number of hospitalizations drops or if the vaccination is approved for young people. children.

The mandate will be dropped when daily hospitalizations fall below 2,500 for seven consecutive days, according to Ferrer. Once that threshold is reached, “masking will no longer be required outdoors at outdoor mega events or in indoor outdoor spaces in day care centers and K-12 schools,” Ferrer said.

Even if this threshold is not met, the mandate could be abandoned eight weeks after the approval of vaccines for children under 5 years old. Pfizer has submitted an application to the Food and Drug Administration to have its vaccine approved for children 6 months to 5 years old. A hearing is scheduled for February 15.

Los Angeles County is the second largest school district in the nation, with over 600,000 students.

February 08, 1:53 p.m.
Daily cases below 300,000 for the first time this year

The U.S. case rate is down, down 63.4% since the peak three weeks ago, according to federal data.

For the first time since December, daily cases in the United States are below 300,000.

However, experts continue to warn that the United States is not off the hook. Case levels remain much higher than the country’s previous surges, and the United States is still reporting millions of new cases every week. Experts also point out that many Americans who take home tests do not submit their results and therefore the total number of cases may be higher than reported.

On average, about 13,000 Americans with COVID-19 are admitted to hospital each day — a drop of 26.4% in the past week, according to federal data.

Emergency room visits with diagnosed cases of COVID-19 are also down, down nearly 60% in the past month, according to federal data.

The U.S. mortality average is at a plateau, with the country reporting about 2,300 new COVID-19-related deaths every day, according to federal data. This average is significantly lower than last winter, when the country peaked at around 3,400 deaths per day.

ABC News’ Arielle Mitropoulos

February 08, 11:28 a.m.
Omicron is estimated at 96.4% of new cases

The presence of the omicron subvariant, BA.2, is increasing in the United States, according to new data released by the CDC.

BA.2 is estimated to account for 3.6% of new COVID-19 cases in the United States as of February 5. BA.2 is expected to represent 1.2% of new cases the previous week.

The original omicron strain, B.1.1.529, still makes up the vast majority of new cases, accounting for about 96.4% of cases in the United States.

There are still many unknowns about the BA.2 variant, but currently it does not appear to demonstrate more severe disease. There is also no indication that BA.2 will have any further impact on vaccine efficacy.

The delta variant, which accounted for 99.2% of all new cases just two months ago, is now estimated at 0% of new cases.

ABC News’ Arielle Mitropoulos, Eric M. Strauss

Copyright © 2022, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

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Ulvaeus searches for the source of the ABBA magic with the Apple radio show | ap-entertainment https://colinmarshallradio.com/ulvaeus-searches-for-the-source-of-the-abba-magic-with-the-apple-radio-show-ap-entertainment/ Fri, 28 Jan 2022 18:44:33 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/ulvaeus-searches-for-the-source-of-the-abba-magic-with-the-apple-radio-show-ap-entertainment/ LOS ANGELES (AP) — ABBA’s Björn Ulvaeus is launching a radio show on Apple Music, hoping to figure out why his songs like “Mamma Mia” and “Dancing Queen” have stuck in the minds of such a big fan. part of the world for so long several decades. The Swedish supergroup guitarist, vocalist and co-songwriter will […]]]>

LOS ANGELES (AP) — ABBA’s Björn Ulvaeus is launching a radio show on Apple Music, hoping to figure out why his songs like “Mamma Mia” and “Dancing Queen” have stuck in the minds of such a big fan. part of the world for so long several decades.

The Swedish supergroup guitarist, vocalist and co-songwriter will host the “Björn from ABBA and Friends’ Radio Show” on Apple Music Hits starting Monday.

The limited series includes music and conversations with Ulvaeus’ friends and collaborators, starting with the first episode with fellow producer, songwriter and Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Nile Rodgers.

Ulvaeus and Rodgers talk about the secrets of creating hits and why ABBA’s music has stuck in the public consciousness.

“I’ve long wanted to ask emotionally intelligent and intellectual people who know ABBA why they think our songs have lasted so long – almost 40 years – because I don’t understand it myself,” the 76-said Ulvaeus, a year.

The show comes in the middle a major revival of ABBA. Ulvaeus and bandmates Agnetha Fältskog, Anni-Frid Lyngstad and Benny Andersson released their first new music together in four decades in November on the album “Voyager.” And in May, a series of live holographic shows are set to begin, created by George Lucas’ band and special effects company, Industrial Light & Magic.

Ulvaeus’ other guests on the radio show include Catherine Johnson, the British playwright who wrote the play “Mamma Mia!” and the script for the next film.

Johan Renck, the creative director of the upcoming concerts, guest on another episode, all of which will air at 3:00 p.m. Eastern this week and can be streamed afterward.

Ulvaeus is the latest of many music stars to host a show on the service. Others include Elton John, The Weeknd, J Balvin and Shania Twain.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

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ABBA radio show focus https://colinmarshallradio.com/abba-radio-show-focus/ Thu, 27 Jan 2022 14:05:32 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/abba-radio-show-focus/ LOS ANGELES – ABBA’s Björn Ulvaeus is launching a radio show on Apple Music, hoping to find out why his songs like “Mamma Mia” and “Dancing Queen” have stuck in the minds of so much of the world for so many decades. The Swedish supergroup guitarist, vocalist and co-songwriter will host the “Björn from ABBA […]]]>

LOS ANGELES – ABBA’s Björn Ulvaeus is launching a radio show on Apple Music, hoping to find out why his songs like “Mamma Mia” and “Dancing Queen” have stuck in the minds of so much of the world for so many decades.

The Swedish supergroup guitarist, vocalist and co-songwriter will host the “Björn from ABBA and Friends’ Radio Show” on Apple Music Hits starting Monday.

The limited series includes music and conversations with Ulvaeus’ friends and collaborators, starting with the first episode with fellow producer, songwriter and Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Nile Rodgers.

Ulvaeus and Rodgers talk about the secrets of creating hits and why ABBA’s music has stuck in the public consciousness.

“I’ve long wanted to ask emotionally intelligent and intellectual people who know ABBA why they think our songs have lasted so long – almost 40 years – because I don’t understand it myself,” the 76-said Ulvaeus, a year.

The show comes in the midst of a major ABBA revival. Ulvaeus and bandmates Agnetha Fältskog, Anni-Frid Lyngstad and Benny Andersson released their first new music together in four decades in November on the album “Voyager.” And in May, a series of live holographic shows are set to begin, created by George Lucas’ band and special effects company, Industrial Light & Magic.

Ulvaeus is the latest to host a show on the service. Others include Elton John, The Weeknd, J Balvin and Shania Twain.

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Live radio show captures local quirkiness https://colinmarshallradio.com/live-radio-show-captures-local-quirkiness/ Thu, 27 Jan 2022 02:49:39 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/live-radio-show-captures-local-quirkiness/ By Bridgette M. RedmanPasadena Weekly Contributing Writer OWho needs a meadow when you have the twin cities of Pasadena and Altadena? Radio show buffs who hold a special place in their hearts for the Garrison Keillor program of yore will want to tune in to Sandra Tsing Loh’s plans to celebrate the eccentricity of life […]]]>

By Bridgette M. Redman
Pasadena Weekly Contributing Writer

OWho needs a meadow when you have the twin cities of Pasadena and Altadena?

Radio show buffs who hold a special place in their hearts for the Garrison Keillor program of yore will want to tune in to Sandra Tsing Loh’s plans to celebrate the eccentricity of life in ‘Denas on her radio show in live at the iconic Coffee Gallery Backstage in Altadena.

Taking place monthly for the next year – barring any pandemic hiccups – the live show lines up guest local stars who shine a light on all that makes the cities unique.

The first show is at 3 p.m. on Sunday, January 30.

Loh knows what it takes to make radio shine, even when it’s not on the air. She is a longtime NPR and KPCC commentator, known for her show “Loh Down on Science.” She lines up guests such as Nobel Prize-winning banjo player David Politzer — no, he didn’t win for playing the banjo, that’s just a bonus — and an MTV star who also does mystery theater .

“For decades I thought of the ‘Prairie Home Companion’ – the original Garrison Keillor show,” Loh said. “Thirty years ago I did a song, ‘A Freeway Home Companion,’ which was a version of Los Angeles. It still had an intimate story, except with helicopters overhead. I always loved that idea.

The brewing idea sprouted late last year, inspired by Bob Stane’s Coffee Gallery Backstage. During the pandemic, she would occasionally meet a friend there for coffee just to get out of the house. The two peeked into the back room, where Stane hosts live performances.

“You open a door and there’s this adorable performance space,” Loh said. “It’s really old-fashioned, really intimate. They’ve been making music for years and years, and I thought it would be really fun to do something local with everything small scale.

While many people think of Beverly Hills or Sunset Boulevard when they think of Los Angeles, Loh is happy to do her show on Pasadena, Altadena and Eagle Rock, which she dubs “Eagle Rock-a-dena.”

“It’s these hilarious suburbs,” Loh said. “They’re pretty sweet. Some have drought-tolerant gardening. There is a small soy-based cheese factory. Instead of a slow week in Lake Wobegon, we’ll have, “It was a slow week in the ‘Denas.’ It’ll be a similar small-town feel with hyperlocal stories and charming acoustic music.

It’s the type of show, she says, that feels like a tonic at the moment, a cure for anyone who feels stressed and alienated.

Like the show it’s based on, it will have fake sponsors, such as Altadena Goddess Wear, Peachables, and Let’s Go to Fresno.

The goddess pants are a continuation of her character in an autobiographical humor book she wrote, “The Madwoman and the Roomba.”

“You have these soft pants where we’re not fat, we’re goddesses,” Loh said. “There is a goddess clothing store. There’s a dusty shop cat and scented lotions and candles for those times when you can’t face the rest of the world.”

Peachables are…something. Maybe it’s cheese. It may be a fruit. It could be a snack. In one of the sketches, it is offered to the hostess in front of a gluten-free guest and another allergic to wheat.

“It’s for those of us who can’t cope with cheese without fruit,” Loh said.

Let’s Go to Fresno is for those who can’t afford a luxury vacation.

Then there are handcrafted stories that capture the personality of the ‘Denas. Loh talks about how drought gardening is a local thing.

“It’s almost a violent thing that we argue with our neighbors about who has the best bee, the most pollinator-friendly gardens,” Loh said. “It’s competitive gardening that’s on a passive-aggressive level.”

Other stories will include arguments in Trader Joe’s about soymilk and questions about parking or the eccentric billionaire in the hills who never leaves his house. The stories will be told on their new fictional public radio station, KNDA.

“The news is always very nice, and then there’s the weather,” Loh said. “There is no politics or COVID. It may rage around us, but the news will have time or how someone’s cat strayed into someone else’s yard. It is a satirical fiction, but sweet.

Then there is the music. She asks her guests to perform songs with a classic American twist — tunes that might have been heard on “The Ed Sullivan Show” or people can find in hootenannies.

Guests on January’s premiere show are John Michael Higgins (“Pitch Perfect,” “Best in Show”), Maxayn Lewis (Original Ikette, sang Ma Rainey in “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom”), Jim Turner (MTV’s “Randee of the Redwoods”, Duck’s Breath Mystery Theatre) and Politzer.

Higgins, who was also in “A Mighty Wind”, loves doing vocal arrangements. He will prepare them for the show and bring in singers.

“He’s really obsessed with four-part harmonies,” Loh said. “He would like to do eight games or ten games. He has a full vibe of being a great comedic actor and is completely enthralled with multi-part harmonies. I’m so glad he agreed (to be on the show).

Lewis is an actor, singer, and original cast member of “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom.” Loh said she was not only an amazing singer, but a great spirit. She expects Lewis to sing “Proud Mary” among other songs.

Turner cooked up a comedy skit about a new-age guru who runs a women-only workshop and does it in a ridiculous way. His character, Loh said, is a bit of a quack but sure to be a laugh.

Shows are scheduled on the last Sunday of each month throughout the year. Each show will have a different theme, something that could be taken from an almanac. Loh says after two years of a pandemic, there’s something wonderful about making music together, even if we can’t go to an arena with 10,000 people.

“The program is just over an hour, which is perfect for COVID times,” Loh said.

“We will have a hootenanny at the end where the public can sing along. If they bring an instrument, they can play it. We’ll do a few songs all together, and people can sing along or clap spoons.


“A ‘Dena Home Companion”

WHEN: 3 p.m. on Sunday, January 30, continuing on the last Sunday of each month

OR: Bob Stane Backstage Coffee Gallery, 2029 Lake Avenue, Altadena

COST: $20

INFORMATION: 626-798-6236, coffeegallery.com

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Radio Station WHMI 93.5 FM – News, Weather, Traffic, Sports, School Updates and the Best Classic Hits from Livingston County Michigan https://colinmarshallradio.com/radio-station-whmi-93-5-fm-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hits-from-livingston-county-michigan/ Wed, 26 Jan 2022 23:02:26 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/radio-station-whmi-93-5-fm-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hits-from-livingston-county-michigan/ Go Nakamura/Getty Images (NEW YORK) — As the COVID-19 pandemic has swept the world, more than 5.6 million people have died from the disease worldwide, including more than 872,000 Americans, according to compiled real-time data. by the Center for Systems Science and Systems at Johns Hopkins University. Engineering. About 63.5% of the population in the […]]]>
Go Nakamura/Getty Images

(NEW YORK) — As the COVID-19 pandemic has swept the world, more than 5.6 million people have died from the disease worldwide, including more than 872,000 Americans, according to compiled real-time data. by the Center for Systems Science and Systems at Johns Hopkins University. Engineering.

About 63.5% of the population in the United States is fully vaccinated against COVID-19, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Here’s how the news evolves. All times Eastern:

January 26, 6:36 p.m.
1st participant to receive Moderna’s omicron-specific vaccine

Moderna announced Wednesday that the first participant has been dosed in the Phase 2 study of its omicron-specific booster candidate, in case it becomes necessary.

The Moderna trials will include people who received two doses of the original Moderna vaccine and people who received two doses of the original Moderna vaccine and a Moderna booster shot.

Pfizer announced on Tuesday that it has launched clinical studies to evaluate an omicron-based vaccine for adults.

January 26, 5 p.m.
NIH trial finds mixing and matching boosters safe and effective

A National Institutes of Health study published in the New England Journal of Medicine found that mix-and-match boosters are safe and create an immune response similar to sticking with your initial vaccine.

An earlier version of this study, with more preliminary results, helped guide the CDC’s decision to allow mix-and-match.

The study authors do not claim that specific combinations are more or less effective. The study found that people who received an mRNA vaccine (Pfizer or Moderna) and then received the Johnson & Johnson booster had a significant increase in T-cell response, part of immunity.

The trial involved 458 participants who received a vaccine without prior COVID-19 infection. This data relates only to the first 29 days following receipt of the reminder; the researchers plan to follow the participants for a year, which will provide more data.

– ABC News’ Vanya Jain, Sony Salzman, Eric Strauss, Dr. Alexis Carrington

January 26, 4:47 p.m.
Unvaccinated child dies in Mississippi

An unvaccinated child has died in Mississippi of COVID-19, according to the state health department.

The department confirmed to ABC News that the child was between 11 and 17 years old, an eligible age range to receive Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine.

This was the 10th child – including an infant – to die in Mississippi from COVID-19. None of the 10 children have been vaccinated, according to the health department.

-Josh Hoyos of ABC News

January 26, 10:40 a.m.
US hospital admissions set to fall for first time in months

Hospital admissions related to COVID-19 in the United States are expected to fall in the coming weeks, the first time the country has seen a drop in months, according to forecasting models used by the CDC.

Estimates suggest that between 4,900 and 27,800 Americans could be admitted to hospital each day by February 18.

Deaths from COVID-19 are expected to remain stable or have an uncertain trend. Estimates suggest about 33,000 more Americans could die from COVID-19 over the next two weeks.

– ABC News’ Arielle Mitropoulos

January 25, 6:06 p.m.
All Super Bowl attendees will receive a KN95 mask

Every attendee at next month’s Super Bowl in Los Angeles will receive a KN95 mask, health officials announced Tuesday.

Additionally, “members of the safety team” will remind fans to keep their masks on unless they’re eating or drinking, Los Angeles County Public Health Director Barbara Ferrer said during the interview. a meeting of the county board of supervisors.

Super Bowl Experience attendees will also receive a free at-home rapid test kit, Ferrer said, with messages to test ahead of the big game on Feb. 13 at SoFi Stadium.

The county plans to distribute more than 60,000 take-out kits at the Super Bowl Experience, which will be held at the Los Angeles Convention Center from February 5-12.

-Jennifer Watts of ABC News

Copyright © 2022, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

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ABBA’s Björn Ulvaeus launches radio show on Apple Music https://colinmarshallradio.com/abbas-bjorn-ulvaeus-launches-radio-show-on-apple-music/ Mon, 24 Jan 2022 21:42:21 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/abbas-bjorn-ulvaeus-launches-radio-show-on-apple-music/ LOS ANGELES – ABBA’s Björn Ulvaeus is launching a radio show on Apple Music, hoping to find out why his songs like “Mamma Mia” and “Dancing Queen” have stuck in the minds of so much of the world for so many decades. The Swedish supergroup guitarist, vocalist and co-songwriter will host the “Björn from ABBA […]]]>

LOS ANGELES – ABBA’s Björn Ulvaeus is launching a radio show on Apple Music, hoping to find out why his songs like “Mamma Mia” and “Dancing Queen” have stuck in the minds of so much of the world for so many decades.

The Swedish supergroup guitarist, vocalist and co-songwriter will host the “Björn from ABBA and Friends’ Radio Show” on Apple Music Hits starting Monday.

The limited series includes music and conversations with Ulvaeus’ friends and collaborators, starting with the first episode with fellow producer, songwriter and Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Nile Rodgers.

Ulvaeus and Rodgers talk about the secrets of creating hits and why ABBA’s music has stuck in the public consciousness.

“I’ve long wanted to ask emotionally intelligent and intellectual people who know ABBA why they think our songs have lasted so long – almost 40 years – because I don’t understand it myself,” the 76-said Ulvaeus, a year.

The show comes in the midst of a major ABBA revival. Ulvaeus and bandmates Agnetha Fältskog, Anni-Frid Lyngstad and Benny Andersson released their first new music together in four decades in November on the album “Voyager.” And in May, a series of live holographic shows are set to begin, created by George Lucas’ band and special effects company, Industrial Light & Magic.

Ulvaeus’ other guests on the radio show include Catherine Johnson, the British playwright who wrote the play “Mamma Mia!” and the script for the next film.

Johan Renck, the creative director of the upcoming concerts, guest on another episode, all of which will air at 3:00 p.m. Eastern this week and can be streamed afterward.

Ulvaeus is the latest of many music stars to host a show on the service. Others include Elton John, The Weeknd, J Balvin and Shania Twain.

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WDET 101.9FM WDET is Detroit’s public radio station https://colinmarshallradio.com/wdet-101-9fm-wdet-is-detroits-public-radio-station-4/ Sat, 22 Jan 2022 00:43:13 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/wdet-101-9fm-wdet-is-detroits-public-radio-station-4/ Ryan Patrick Hooper Article by Joshua Neuman for Slate — “Why isn’t Kenny Washington an American icon?” — shines a light on the little-known legacy of former football player Kenny Washington, who broke the NFL’s color barrier a year before Jackie Robinson arrived in MLB to do the same. When it comes to sports history, […]]]>

Ryan Patrick Hooper

Article by Joshua Neuman for Slate — “Why isn’t Kenny Washington an American icon?” — shines a light on the little-known legacy of former football player Kenny Washington, who broke the NFL’s color barrier a year before Jackie Robinson arrived in MLB to do the same.

When it comes to sports history, Kenny Washington is not a household name like Jackie Robinson. At least one writer wants to see that shift by telling the story of Washington becoming the first African-American soccer player to sign a professional league contract.

Joshua Neuman wrote the article “Why is Kenny Washington not an American icon?” for Slate. While Washington broke the color barrier in football a year before Robinson did the same for Major League Baseball, Neuman argues he’s often referred to as “Jackie Robinson” for a while, except the other way around.

“It’s unfair to the memory of Kenny Washington to present his desegregation from the NFL as a ‘Jackie Robinson moment’ when it’s quite the opposite.” —Josue Neuman

Robinson and Washington played sports together in college and grew up 6 miles apart in Los Angeles, but ended up with divergent careers with different sports heritages.

“Washington isn’t even in the Hall of Fame,” says Neuman, who joined CultureShift on WDET to talk about his story for Slate.


Listen: Joshua Neuman explains how Kenny Washington was upstaged by Jackie Robinson.


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  • Ryan Patrick Hooper is CultureShift’s award-winning host and producer on NPR station 101.9 WDET-FM Detroit. As a longtime arts and culture journalist and photographer, Hooper has covered stories for NPR, Detroit Free Press, Hour Detroit, SPIN and Paste magazine.

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WHMI 93.5 FM radio station – Livingston County Michigan News, weather, traffic, sports, school updates and the best classic hit https://colinmarshallradio.com/whmi-93-5-fm-radio-station-livingston-county-michigan-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hit-14/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 21:42:44 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/whmi-93-5-fm-radio-station-livingston-county-michigan-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hit-14/ Christopher Dilts / Bloomberg via Getty Images (CHICAGO) – More than 350,000 Chicago public school students are expected to resume in-person learning on Wednesday after a tentative agreement was reached between the school district and the Chicago Teachers Union to strengthen classroom safety amid ‘a wave of COVID-19 infections. A deal was struck Monday night […]]]>
Christopher Dilts / Bloomberg via Getty Images

(CHICAGO) – More than 350,000 Chicago public school students are expected to resume in-person learning on Wednesday after a tentative agreement was reached between the school district and the Chicago Teachers Union to strengthen classroom safety amid ‘a wave of COVID-19 infections.

A deal was struck Monday night to end nearly a week of classroom and distance learning cancellations. Tuesday marked the fifth day that students left classrooms after a long vacation break.

The more than 25,000 teachers and staff in the country’s third largest school district are due to return to their schools on Tuesday to prepare for the reopening of classrooms.

Negotiations between the CTU and the district focused on demands to expand student testing for the virus and create a package of measures designed to trigger school closures and the return of distance learning if coronavirus infections continue to skyrocket. The talks have at times become controversial, with union leaders accusing Mayor Lori Lightfoot of “intimidating” teachers in classrooms and school district officials accusing the union of organizing an “illegal walkout”.

The two sides filed complaints with a state labor commission.

“Some will ask who won and who lost,” Lightfoot said Monday night. “No one wins when our students are not where they can learn best and where they are safest. After leaving school for four consecutive days, I am sure many students will be delighted to come back to school. the classroom with their teachers and peers. And their parents and guardians can now breathe a much needed sigh of relief. “

Pedro Martinez, CEO of Chicago Public Schools, said the district was committed to keeping its students, teachers and staff safe, and said the negotiations forged “some very good things.”

CTU President Jesse Sharkey said on Monday the union had fought to improve classroom safety for students and teachers.

“I’m finally proud that the Chicago Teachers Union has taken a stand,” Sharkey said at a press conference. “We’re going to continue to do what’s right as we navigate this area. It’s not a perfect deal but we’ll hold our heads up high because it was hard to come by.”

The agreement also includes new incentives to increase the number of substitute teachers in the district and establishes measures that will incentivize a return to distance learning, but for individual schools, not for protocols at scale. district requested by the CTU.

The district also offered to spend around $ 100 million to implement a safety plan that includes air purifiers for all classrooms. The district said it will provide KN95 masks to all teachers and students.

The union’s governing body, made up of 700 members, voted by a margin of almost 2 to 1 – 63% to 27% – to end distance education. Base members have until later this week to vote on whether to ratify the deal.

Like Chicago, school districts across the country are reeling from an increase in COVID-19 cases triggered by the highly contagious variant of omicron.

The Los Angeles Unified School District plans to reopen schools for in-person learning on Tuesday, although some schools in the nation’s second-largest school district have chosen to delay reopening due to an increase in reported cases of COVID- 19.

LAUSD officials are demanding that all students and staff be tested for COVID-19 before the first day of class. The district said Monday that at least 65,630 of those tests came back positive.

The Philadelphia School District announced Friday that 46 schools will switch to virtual learning as the omicron variant and a winter storm took its toll on staff.

Copyright © 2022, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

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“Dear Memory”: Victoria Chang’s epistolary grief https://colinmarshallradio.com/dear-memory-victoria-changs-epistolary-grief/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 01:17:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/dear-memory-victoria-changs-epistolary-grief/ [ad_1] This week on The question of writing, Lauren speaks with poet and memory artist Victoria Chang, author Dear memory: Letters on writing, silence and mourning (Asclépiades editions). In this hybrid book of poetry, memory and visual art, Chang explores the grief – and curiosity – she feels alongside the loss of her mother, and […]]]>


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This week on The question of writing, Lauren speaks with poet and memory artist Victoria Chang, author Dear memory: Letters on writing, silence and mourning (Asclépiades editions). In this hybrid book of poetry, memory and visual art, Chang explores the grief – and curiosity – she feels alongside the loss of her mother, and with her, her story and the knowledge of her ancestors. In this conversation, the two explore the ‘a-synchronicity’ of feelings and how silence can be used to both hide and protect.

About Victoria:

Victoria Chang is the author of Dear memory. His poetry books include OBIT, Barbie chang, The boss, Salvinia molesta, and Circle. OBIT received the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, the Anisfield-Wolf Book Award and the PEN Voeckler Award; he was also a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Prize and the Griffin Poetry Prize, and was shortlisted for the National Book Award. She is also the author of a picture book for children, Does mom?, illustrated by Marla Frazee and named a New York Times Notable Book, and a mid-level novel, Love, Love. She has received a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Sustainable Arts Foundation Fellowship, the Alice Fay Di Castagnola Prize from the Poetry Society of America, a Pushcart Prize, a Lannan Residency Fellowship, and a Katherine Min MacDowell Colony Fellowship. She lives in Los Angeles and is the chair of the Master of Fine Arts program at the University of Antioch.

Victoria Chang recommends:

The year of magical thinking and Blue nights by Joan Didion (Vintage Books)

The long goodbye by Megan O’Rourke (Riverhead Books)

Objets d’art: Essays on ecstasy and effrontery by Jeannette Winterson (Old books)

The two types of decomposition by Sarah Manguso (Picador)

H is for Hawk by Helen McDonald (Grove Press)

Lauren Korn recommends:

OBIT by Victoria Chang (Copper Canyon Press)

Grieving sequence by Prageeta Sharma (Poetry of the waves)

A thousand times you lose your treasure by Hoa Nguyen (Poetry of the waves)

“Notes on mourning” by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie in The New Yorker and now published as a book by Knopf Publishing Group

The question of writing the team is Lauren Korn, host and co-producer; Peter Hoag, co-producer and editor; and Tom berich, sound engineer.

The question of writing the logo and branding (2022) were designed by Molly Russell. You can see more of his work on iamthemollruss.com and on Instagram @iamthemollruss.

Funding for The question of writing is from Humanities Montana; members of Montana Public Radio; and the Greater Montana Foundation, promoting communication about issues, trends and values ​​of importance to the people of Montana.

The question of writing is a production of Montana Public Radio.


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