public health – Colin Marshall Radio http://colinmarshallradio.com/ Fri, 25 Mar 2022 14:18:01 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://colinmarshallradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-1-1-120x120.png public health – Colin Marshall Radio http://colinmarshallradio.com/ 32 32 Radio show hears inspiring stories from inspiring women https://colinmarshallradio.com/radio-show-hears-inspiring-stories-from-inspiring-women/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 00:43:41 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/radio-show-hears-inspiring-stories-from-inspiring-women/ Post views: 170 To mark International Women’s Day 2022 (Tuesday March 8), regular Open 4 Business presenter Adrian Pryce on NLive Radio left the ‘hot seat’ for an evening to make way for special guest host Dean from the Karen Jones School of Business and Law. Karen chose the kick tune – fellow countrywoman Dame […]]]>

Post views: 170

To mark International Women’s Day 2022 (Tuesday March 8), regular Open 4 Business presenter Adrian Pryce on NLive Radio left the ‘hot seat’ for an evening to make way for special guest host Dean from the Karen Jones School of Business and Law.

Karen chose the kick tune – fellow countrywoman Dame Shirley Bassey singing I Am What I Am – and her guests also chose their own, encapsulating how they feel as individual women in leadership roles.

The theme for International Women’s Day 2022 this year, the theme is Break the Bias and Karen was joined by four women who hold various roles across the city and county who spoke about their unique professional or academic journeys. They discussed the challenges they have faced, what inspires them and how, despite the huge progress made towards gender equality, there is still a long way to go.

Colleen Rattigan, Northamptonshire Police Chief of Staff spoke about her strategic role which is at the executive level in the police force and her journey to this senior role from a varied background, including public health and as an early childhood practitioner. She adds that Northamptonshire Police have done and continue to do a lot to address gender-related workplace challenges.

After Colleen was Rufia Ashraf, Northampton’s first ever female Mayor in Northampton a role historically generally held by men. She spoke of her work with communities and individuals as Northampton’s ‘first citizen’ and how meeting people inspires her. She added that being a woman brings new and different qualities that help elevate the role.

Morcea Walker – who is from Jamaica and came to the UK aged nine – explained how she dealt with racism when she arrived and the marginal roles black women had at that time. Morcea takes listeners on his very personal journey through an interesting career, his passion for community and family work.

The last guest was the University’s own Becky Bradshaw, Executive Director of Estates and Campus Services. She spoke about her role in integrating the University into the community, how her work is not just about bricks and mortar, and how the professional world is more accommodating and respectful of professional women.

Listen to the full chat again here.

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Colorado’s first prison internet radio show airs behind bars https://colinmarshallradio.com/colorados-first-prison-internet-radio-show-airs-behind-bars/ Wed, 02 Mar 2022 11:55:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/colorados-first-prison-internet-radio-show-airs-behind-bars/ Wearing a forest green jumpsuit and chunky headphones over his ears, Anthony Quintana leans into the microphone and greets listeners to Colorado’s first state prison internet radio station. He has been behind bars for 33 years, isolated from his family and the outside world, but today his voice can reach most cells in the Colorado […]]]>

Wearing a forest green jumpsuit and chunky headphones over his ears, Anthony Quintana leans into the microphone and greets listeners to Colorado’s first state prison internet radio station.

He has been behind bars for 33 years, isolated from his family and the outside world, but today his voice can reach most cells in the Colorado state prison system. He is one of 15 inmates from three Colorado facilities behind Inside Wire, which launched Tuesday via coloradoprisonradio.com.

The station will not air live, but its incarcerated producers take inspiration from radio DJs, providing music and commentary to break up the monotony of prison life and give new perspectives to those behind bars.

And while other prisons have offered low-power prison radio programs — available to those who live near prisons — Colorado’s online station allows producers from the three participating prison studios to be heard in n’ any facility in the state, where inmates can tune in through the prison televisions.

The soundproof walls of Limon Correctional Facility’s recording studio provide a stark contrast to the concrete cells of the Level 4 prison, which houses medium to high risk inmates. Inside the recording studio, housed in a wing reserved for educational programs, interview tips are posted on the wall and audio production instructions are scribbled on a whiteboard. A “Billboard Book of Top 40 Hits” sits on the desk next to an audio switchboard.

For Quintana, or DJ Q-VO as he calls himself on air, the show is an opportunity to fight the stigma of prison life.

“I took the life of a man and not a day goes by and everything I do without acknowledging it,” said Quintana, engineer and director of operations for the program. “I want people to know that there really are people changing here.”

“Transforming prisons into places of humanity”

Inside Wire, a collaboration between the Colorado Department of Corrections and the University of Denver’s Prison Arts Initiative, is produced by people incarcerated at Limon Correctional Facility, Sterling Correctional Facility, and Denver Women’s Correctional Facility.

“It is one more stake in our mission to transform prisons into a place of humanity, to have a purpose, an intentionality and to bring men and women behind the walls not only in this mission, but for that they’re leading the mission to make prisons more intentional,” Dean Williams, executive director of the Colorado Department of Corrections, told the Colorado Sun.

He called Inside Wire part of the journey to “make prisons more intentional and human.”

Inmates, Darrius Turner (left) and Anthony Quintana (center) speak with Colorado Department of Corrections Executive Director Dean Williams for Inside Wire at Limon Correctional Facility, Limon, Colorado, Tuesday, March 1, 2022. (Parker Seibold, special for the Colorado Sun)

He hopes the program will help change the prison culture to become more goal-oriented and help share the stories of incarcerated men and women.

“So when these men and women lead, it not only changes them, but it changes us and how we respond,” he said.

Inside Wire producers will produce a variety of segments, including weekly conversations with Williams on a program called “Up to the Minute with Dean Williams.”

There are no restrictions on what inmates can request, although they must be respectful and intentional in their requests, he said.

“I expect them to not just be fluff or softballs all the time,” Williams said. “The only thing I said was that whatever you ask should be done with dignity and respect.”

Inside Wire’s lineup is diverse, with music from all genres, from country to hip-hop. Instead of commercials, the producers record short public service announcements, ranging from health and fitness tips to promotional clips for Inside Wire.

Segments will include the “With (In)” podcast, another collaboration between DU and CDOC, which aims to change the conversation about who is in prison. On Friday nights, “One Tune” will air, which leaves guests wondering: If you were stranded on an island or in space and could take one song with you, which one would it be and why?

Darrius Turner, Music Director and Producer of Inside Wire at Limon Correctional Facility, adjusts levels on a soundboard as he produces the show ahead of its launch Tuesday, March 1, 2022. (Parker Seibold, Special to The Colorado Sun)

A way to go beyond their past

Beyond Prison Walls, the program is intended to help provide listeners with a new perspective on what prison culture is all about and offers prisoners a new way to move beyond their past into a brighter future. positive, said Ryan Conarro, staff member of DU’s Prison Arts Initiative. and program director and general manager of Inside Wire.

“Many of the people I work with inside prisons are here because they have done wrong and they are separated from society because of it and they are working on healing and redemption. . If we continue to have what has traditionally been there, which is a space of great isolation and a sense of lack of connection, that redemption and healing is much less likely to occur. … I think telling stories, listening to each other and sharing those stories is fundamental,” Conarro said.

After the segments are recorded, they are reviewed by the producers at Inside Wire, then by Conarro, and finally by CDOC staff. So far, hundreds of hours of content have been created, but none have been reported.

“We agreed that the content we share, the stories and voices we share, always want to go in the direction of shared healing and mutual understanding. So, from the songs on our playlist to the personal stories we amplify inside the installations, we want them to embody that,” Conarro said.

But the contents aren’t meant to be “sugar coated,” he said.

“It’s not meant to be a little sliver of reality. We want to open the minds and eyes of listeners to what prison life is like and who is here, and amplify the stories that complicate a sort of one-dimensional view of who is incarcerated in there,” he said. declared.

Ryan Conarro, Managing Director and Director of Programs at Inside Wire, is joined by the team of inmates at Simon Correctional Facility who created the radio station, as he talks about the program ahead of its launch on Tuesday, March 1, 2022. (Parker Seibold, special for the Colorado Sun)

At 11 a.m. Tuesday, the six incarcerated producers at Limon Correctional Center gathered inside the prison library to listen to the launch of the show which also aired on television to the cells of thousands of other inmates across the state.

“10, 9, 8, 7,” the producers count down the air before the sound of a rocket explodes. “Ladies and gentlemen, Inside Wire Colorado Prison Radio is about to connect to every prison in Colorado, and beyond.”

Darrius Turner, the programme’s musical director, said it was important to be part of the program which he hopes shows his personal growth since his incarceration in 2009.

“Being with this group of guys to accomplish something that’s bigger than us and passing that on to the next generation to give them positive tools, that’s what made it really surreal to be a part of this,” Turner said. .

His mother, three children and girlfriend will listen to the kickoff broadcast, along with his sister who said she would play it on the PA system of a dry cleaner in Florida, where she works.

Benny Hill was sentenced to life without parole, but he hopes the program will help other inmates before they reenter society to find validation, find value and learn to deal with the issues that brought them down. in jail, he said.

Benny Hill, inmate at Limon Correctional Facility and director and feature film producer for Inside Wire poses for a portrait in a classroom at Limon Correctional Facility, in Limon, Colorado on Tuesday, March 1, 2022. ( Parker Seibold, Special for the Colorado Sun)

“There are a lot of good people here who are under the shadow of a lot of terrible things: addictions, violence, hate, anger,” he said. “And prison can fix that in a way, not just by putting band-aids on things, but fix it in a way that will end up changing a person for the better.”

Some people will be released, and when they do, Hill hopes prison programs, like InsideWire, will give them the tools to contribute to society in a positive way.

“Because when he comes out and becomes a father, and becomes a husband, boyfriend, son, and then finally, I’d like to see that person be the best they can be.”

Inside Wire is also available on the Inside Wire app.


We believe vital information should be seen by those affected, whether it is a public health crisis, investigative reporting, or holding lawmakers accountable. This report depends on the support of readers like you.

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Radio Station WHMI 93.5 FM – News, Weather, Traffic, Sports, School Updates and the Best Classic Hits from Livingston County Michigan https://colinmarshallradio.com/radio-station-whmi-93-5-fm-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hits-from-livingston-county-michigan-6/ Sat, 19 Feb 2022 19:24:42 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/radio-station-whmi-93-5-fm-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hits-from-livingston-county-michigan-6/ ABC News (NEW YORK) — The bridge that connects Hidalgo, Texas, to Reynosa, Mexico, has become a path of uncertainty and fear for thousands of families seeking opportunity. Amid continued ambiguity over US immigration policies, a migrant encampment has grown to around 2,200 in the past year, according to estimates from nonprofits working in the […]]]>
ABC News

(NEW YORK) — The bridge that connects Hidalgo, Texas, to Reynosa, Mexico, has become a path of uncertainty and fear for thousands of families seeking opportunity.

Amid continued ambiguity over US immigration policies, a migrant encampment has grown to around 2,200 in the past year, according to estimates from nonprofits working in the region. . The Sea of ​​Tents is about a block from the International Bridge in the city of Reynosa in northern Mexico.

Jessica Leon, a Salvadoran mother who has been in Reynosa for seven months with her young children, told ABC News that life in the camp is “dangerous” and “difficult”.

“We are exposed to many dangers here, like cartels, for example. Anyone can come in here at any time. We are extremely vulnerable to many dangers,” she said.

“I’ve been waiting for asylum, and we’ve been waiting for a long time. And when you don’t see results, you feel hopeless,” Leon added.

As the families face harsh living conditions, the fate of their trips depends in part on how long the Biden administration continues to use Title 42, a policy reinforced by the Trump administration during the pandemic. It allows US Customs and Border Protection to deport thousands of migrants amid the COVID-19 pandemic without giving them the opportunity to seek asylum in the United States.

Title 42 refers to a clause in the Public Health Services Act of 1944 that allows the government to prevent migrants from entering the United States during public health emergencies; however, defenders challenging the administration’s use of the order in court have argued that US law does not allow the government to deport people seeking asylum without due process.

Customs and Border Protection encountered 1.7 million people at the US-Mexico border in 2021, according to data released by the agency last month – the highest on record in a year. About 1.2 million people encountered were deported under Title 42, CBP said.

.@ABCMireya speaks exclusively to the head of the U.S. Border Patrol who is preparing his officers for a possible change in policy, as migrant families continue to be in limbo in Mexico. “I don’t have enough agents, I know I don’t have enough equipment,” he says. https://t.co/x8J07soSZR pic.twitter.com/RHhwEhUfN1

— ABC News Live (@ABCNewsLive) February 18, 2022

US Border Patrol Chief Raul Ortiz spoke exclusively to ABC News correspondent Mireya Villarreal about the growing problems along the border. Although he recognizes that Title 42 is a tool they would like to continue using, his agency is preparing for it to eventually disappear.

“We know this won’t last forever as the health pandemic begins to wane…that we may not have Title 42 forever,” Ortiz said. “So we have to make adjustments to be able to prepare for that. And so what I’m doing is making sure that I have treatment coordinators who can do some of those tasks and responsibilities, and then m to ensure our officers are safe.”

“You know, at one point I had two, three thousand officers in quarantine almost every day,” he added. “Right now I have maybe two or three hundred in quarantine. So we’re protecting ourselves better. And I think that’s some of those things that have to happen for us to be successful.”

Chief Ortiz said he recognizes declining morale and regularly reminds officers not to get drawn into political discussions.

“I know I don’t have enough agents, I know I don’t have enough equipment, and then I know I have to close some doors and gaps. That would put us in a better position to be successful.” , he added.

Title 42 was strengthened during the pandemic by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In a statement to ABC News, CDC officials said that every 60 days the agency reviews “the status of the COVID-19 pandemic and associated public health risks.”

The latest assessment completed in late January determined that the use of Title 42 remains “in effect,” the CDC said, citing the impact of the pandemic and an “increase in cases and hospitalizations since December due to the highly transferable from Omicron”. “

Across the border in Reynosa, Mexico, Felicia Rangel-Samponaro, principal of The Sidewalk School, an American nonprofit organization that runs solely on donations, told ABC News that the school “should grow at a very rapid pace” to accommodate a surge in child asylum seekers from various countries.

The organization provides clothes and food to families who lack resources and live in conditions that make cooking extremely difficult.

Rangel-Samponaro said she has seen the encampment grow every day as the number of migrants has increased and said the problem “never stopped” under the Biden administration.

“There are no white asylum seekers in this camp, and that’s what people should be asking themselves. Why is it different for white asylum seekers? ?” she says.

A few miles away, Pastor Hector Silva runs the Senda De Vida Shelter – part of the Senda De Vida Ministry House, which has been providing support to migrant families for over two decades.

Silva said most families crossing the border return after running out of money, and the shelter provides them with food and clothing as they face a life in limbo.

Jessica Leon has a brother who lives in Houston, Texas, and hopes to give her children a “good future” in the United States, because in El Salvador they struggled with poverty and lack of job opportunities.

Leon said she and her children live in a tent with a mattress that her children share, while she sleeps on the floor.

“For love and to achieve our dreams, we endure, but it’s very difficult,” she said.

Next week, the Biden administration plans to begin processing and admitting migrants forced to wait in Mexico under the Trump administration’s “migrant protection protocols,” three administration officials told ABC. News.

The Biden administration is currently engaged in a legal battle with a coalition of civil rights groups, led by the American Civil Liberties Union, over its use of Title 42.

The White House defended its use of the public health order in federal court just last month, arguing that lifting it would lead to overcrowding at DHS facilities and that an influx of migrants poses a risk to public health.

Rangel-Samponaro said migrants caught in limbo are hoping changes in US immigration policies will give them a chance for a fresh start.

“What you see is hope for Biden to win the 42nd title, which he can anytime he wants,” Rangel-Sampanaro said. Eliminating the use of Title 42 would give migrants a chance to apply for asylum, he said.

And for the families living in the Reynosa camp, the hope for a better future for their children keeps them going.

“Believe me it’s difficult, please keep us in mind because there are a lot of families who are hurting. Children are the most vulnerable,” Leon said.

ABC News’ William Gallego, Luke Barr and Quinn Owen contributed to this report.

Copyright © 2022, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

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Radio Station WHMI 93.5 FM – News, Weather, Traffic, Sports, School Updates and the Best Classic Hits from Livingston County Michigan https://colinmarshallradio.com/radio-station-whmi-93-5-fm-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hits-from-livingston-county-michigan-3/ Mon, 07 Feb 2022 17:42:42 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/radio-station-whmi-93-5-fm-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hits-from-livingston-county-michigan-3/ Luis Alvarez/Getty Images (NEW YORK) — As the COVID-19 pandemic has swept the world, more than 5.7 million people have died from the disease worldwide, including more than 904,000 Americans, according to compiled real-time data. by the Center for Systems Science and Systems at Johns Hopkins University. Engineering. About 64.1% of the population in the […]]]>
Luis Alvarez/Getty Images

(NEW YORK) — As the COVID-19 pandemic has swept the world, more than 5.7 million people have died from the disease worldwide, including more than 904,000 Americans, according to compiled real-time data. by the Center for Systems Science and Systems at Johns Hopkins University. Engineering.

About 64.1% of the population in the United States is fully vaccinated against COVID-19, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Latest titles:
-Connecticut to end statewide school mask mandate
-New Jersey governor to end mask mandate for schools
-All states reporting declining or stable new case rates

Here’s how the news evolves. All times Eastern.

February 07, 4:56 p.m.
Cases in children continue to drop but are still ‘extremely high’

After the United States reported an unprecedented number of new pediatric COVID-19 infections last month, updated data released Monday shows new cases among children have fallen for the second consecutive week.

Nearly 632,000 children tested positive for COVID-19 last week, a huge drop from the record high of 1,150,000 reported the week ending Jan. 20, according to a new report from the American Academy of Pediatrics and of the Children’s Hospital Association.

However, the organizations warn that pediatric cases remain “extremely high” and are still double the level seen during the Delta’s summer surge.

The AAP and CHA noted that there is an “urgent” need to collect more age-specific data to assess disease severity related to new variants as well as potential longer-term effects.

ABC News’ Arielle Mitropoulos

February 07, 4:34 p.m.
Connecticut to end statewide school mask mandate

Connecticut Gov. Ned Lamont announced on Monday that he recommends ending the statewide mask mandate beginning Feb. 28.

Starting in March, the decision on masks in schools will rest with superintendents and mayors based on individual cities’ needs, he said.

It comes hours after New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy said his requirement to wear face masks in schools would end on March 7.

The CDC said it continues to recommend masks for all students 2 and older, regardless of their vaccination status.

February 07, 2:50 p.m.
The White House has contracted 569 million free tests so far

President Joe Biden’s administration has so far contracted for about 569 million rapid home tests as it works to fulfill Biden’s pledge for 1 billion free tests nationwide, has a White House official told ABC News.

According to an ABC News analysis, testing company iHealth is supplying the government with the most tests to meet this goal, with a contract to supply 354 million tests. Roche, Abbott and Siemens are other companies providing testing.

White House officials said about 60 million households have placed test orders so far, for a total of 240 million tests (each household can order four).

The U.S. Postal Service said on Friday it had mailed tests to “tens of millions” of those households.

ABC News’ Cheyenne Haslett, Ben Gittleson, Lucien Bruggeman

February 07, 11:54 a.m.
New Jersey governor to end mask mandate for schools

New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy announced on Monday that the state’s requirement to wear face masks in schools will end on March 7.

“Balancing public health with returning to some semblance of normalcy isn’t easy. But we can take this step responsibly due to declining COVID numbers and growth in vaccinations,” Murphy tweeted.

Murphy, a Democrat, has imposed some of the toughest pandemic-related mandates in the country. New Jersey, an early hotspot for COVID-19 cases, has lost more than 31,000 residents to the virus.

The move follows a move last month by Pennsylvania Governor Tom Wolf, also a Democrat, to rescind his state’s mask mandate for schools.

Meanwhile, Democratic governors in New York and Connecticut have said they are reassessing school mask mandates set to expire later this month.

ABC News’ Aaron Katersky

Copyright © 2022, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

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Radio Station WHMI 93.5 FM – News, Weather, Traffic, Sports, School Updates and the Best Classic Hits from Livingston County Michigan https://colinmarshallradio.com/radio-station-whmi-93-5-fm-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hits-from-livingston-county-michigan/ Wed, 26 Jan 2022 23:02:26 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/radio-station-whmi-93-5-fm-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hits-from-livingston-county-michigan/ Go Nakamura/Getty Images (NEW YORK) — As the COVID-19 pandemic has swept the world, more than 5.6 million people have died from the disease worldwide, including more than 872,000 Americans, according to compiled real-time data. by the Center for Systems Science and Systems at Johns Hopkins University. Engineering. About 63.5% of the population in the […]]]>
Go Nakamura/Getty Images

(NEW YORK) — As the COVID-19 pandemic has swept the world, more than 5.6 million people have died from the disease worldwide, including more than 872,000 Americans, according to compiled real-time data. by the Center for Systems Science and Systems at Johns Hopkins University. Engineering.

About 63.5% of the population in the United States is fully vaccinated against COVID-19, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Here’s how the news evolves. All times Eastern:

January 26, 6:36 p.m.
1st participant to receive Moderna’s omicron-specific vaccine

Moderna announced Wednesday that the first participant has been dosed in the Phase 2 study of its omicron-specific booster candidate, in case it becomes necessary.

The Moderna trials will include people who received two doses of the original Moderna vaccine and people who received two doses of the original Moderna vaccine and a Moderna booster shot.

Pfizer announced on Tuesday that it has launched clinical studies to evaluate an omicron-based vaccine for adults.

January 26, 5 p.m.
NIH trial finds mixing and matching boosters safe and effective

A National Institutes of Health study published in the New England Journal of Medicine found that mix-and-match boosters are safe and create an immune response similar to sticking with your initial vaccine.

An earlier version of this study, with more preliminary results, helped guide the CDC’s decision to allow mix-and-match.

The study authors do not claim that specific combinations are more or less effective. The study found that people who received an mRNA vaccine (Pfizer or Moderna) and then received the Johnson & Johnson booster had a significant increase in T-cell response, part of immunity.

The trial involved 458 participants who received a vaccine without prior COVID-19 infection. This data relates only to the first 29 days following receipt of the reminder; the researchers plan to follow the participants for a year, which will provide more data.

– ABC News’ Vanya Jain, Sony Salzman, Eric Strauss, Dr. Alexis Carrington

January 26, 4:47 p.m.
Unvaccinated child dies in Mississippi

An unvaccinated child has died in Mississippi of COVID-19, according to the state health department.

The department confirmed to ABC News that the child was between 11 and 17 years old, an eligible age range to receive Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine.

This was the 10th child – including an infant – to die in Mississippi from COVID-19. None of the 10 children have been vaccinated, according to the health department.

-Josh Hoyos of ABC News

January 26, 10:40 a.m.
US hospital admissions set to fall for first time in months

Hospital admissions related to COVID-19 in the United States are expected to fall in the coming weeks, the first time the country has seen a drop in months, according to forecasting models used by the CDC.

Estimates suggest that between 4,900 and 27,800 Americans could be admitted to hospital each day by February 18.

Deaths from COVID-19 are expected to remain stable or have an uncertain trend. Estimates suggest about 33,000 more Americans could die from COVID-19 over the next two weeks.

– ABC News’ Arielle Mitropoulos

January 25, 6:06 p.m.
All Super Bowl attendees will receive a KN95 mask

Every attendee at next month’s Super Bowl in Los Angeles will receive a KN95 mask, health officials announced Tuesday.

Additionally, “members of the safety team” will remind fans to keep their masks on unless they’re eating or drinking, Los Angeles County Public Health Director Barbara Ferrer said during the interview. a meeting of the county board of supervisors.

Super Bowl Experience attendees will also receive a free at-home rapid test kit, Ferrer said, with messages to test ahead of the big game on Feb. 13 at SoFi Stadium.

The county plans to distribute more than 60,000 take-out kits at the Super Bowl Experience, which will be held at the Los Angeles Convention Center from February 5-12.

-Jennifer Watts of ABC News

Copyright © 2022, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

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WHMI 93.5 FM radio station – Livingston County Michigan News, weather, traffic, sports, school updates and the best classic hit https://colinmarshallradio.com/whmi-93-5-fm-radio-station-livingston-county-michigan-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hit-8/ Wed, 29 Dec 2021 21:36:31 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/whmi-93-5-fm-radio-station-livingston-county-michigan-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hit-8/ [ad_1] iStock / narvikk (ATLANTA) – Georgia plans to send the National Guard to hospitals and testing sites as the state sets a one-day record for COVID-19 cases. In a statement on Wednesday, Governor Brian Kemp announced that of the 2,500 troops who will eventually be deployed, a total of 196 will begin providing assistance […]]]>


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iStock / narvikk

(ATLANTA) – Georgia plans to send the National Guard to hospitals and testing sites as the state sets a one-day record for COVID-19 cases.

In a statement on Wednesday, Governor Brian Kemp announced that of the 2,500 troops who will eventually be deployed, a total of 196 will begin providing assistance on January 3.

About 100 are sent to hospitals while 96 will help the Department of Public Health at testing sites.

Kemp said that over the next few days, the Georgia Department of Community Health will assign assignments to the remaining 2,300 soldiers based on which centers need help the most.

“I want to reassure the Georgians that we have already overcome this and will do it again,” said the statement from Kemp.

“As we work diligently to provide assistance and reduce wait times for people at testing sites, we urge Georgians to be patient and compassionate towards their neighbors. “

It comes as Georgia recorded 13,670 new confirmed and probable COVID-19 cases on Tuesday, the most reported in a single day and breaking the previous record of 10,165 set on January 8.

The increase in cases has led to an increased demand for testing. Driving centers have seen cars lined up for blocks with people waiting for several hours to be checked.

Dr Lynn Paxton, chief of the Fulton County Board of Health, which includes Atlanta, told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution that the National Guard will help reduce long waits for testing.

“Basically the cavalry is coming,” she said.

In his statement, Kemp said it was encouraging to see data suggesting that people fully vaccinated with a booster are well protected and – if they have a breakthrough infection – tend to develop only mild symptoms.

The fully vaccinated and beefed up governor said he would continue to urge residents to get vaccinated, but did not plan to institute vaccines or masks.

“It is time to trust our citizens to do what is right for them and their families,” the statement said.

“That is why I will absolutely not implement measures that would shut down businesses or separate the vaccinated from the unvaccinated or the masked from the unmasked.”

This is not the first time that Georgia has requested National Guard assistance.

In August, during the state’s delta-fueled surge, Kemp deployed more than 2,500 National Guard troops to Georgia hospitals overwhelmed with COVID-19 patients.

The recent surge in cases has also led Atlanta to cancel the annual Peach Drop celebration – Georgia’s New Year’s Eve ball drop celebration. Additionally, Emory University has announced that spring semester courses will be distance learning until at least January 31.

Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

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State senator dies month after telling local radio station he was sick with Covid-19 while in El Salvador https://colinmarshallradio.com/state-senator-dies-month-after-telling-local-radio-station-he-was-sick-with-covid-19-while-in-el-salvador/ Sun, 19 Dec 2021 03:54:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/state-senator-dies-month-after-telling-local-radio-station-he-was-sick-with-covid-19-while-in-el-salvador/ [ad_1] The family of State Senator Doug Ericksen announced his death in a statement released by the Washington State Senate Republican Caucus on Saturday, but they did not indicate the cause of his death. “We are heartbroken to share that our husband and father passed away on Friday, December 17. Please keep our family in […]]]>


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The family of State Senator Doug Ericksen announced his death in a statement released by the Washington State Senate Republican Caucus on Saturday, but they did not indicate the cause of his death.

“We are heartbroken to share that our husband and father passed away on Friday, December 17. Please keep our family in your prayers and thank you for continuing to respect our privacy at this extremely difficult time,” the statement said.

Ericksen represented the 42nd district of Whatcom County, from Bellingham to the Canadian border, according to his website. He was elected to the Senate in 2010 after serving six terms in the State House, the statement said.
Ericsen told KIRO Radio in November, he contracted the virus while in El Salvador. The station’s chief information officer said in a tweet that Ericksen told them he couldn’t leave the country and that there was no monoclonal antibody treatment available.
In an email sent to Washington state lawmakers on November 11, Ericksen said he “traveled to El Salvador and tested positive for COVID shortly after arriving,” and asked to helping to get the treatment transported to the country to help with his recovery, according to the Seattle Times, who said he obtained the email from a member of the state Senate.
Ericksen had repeatedly called for the resignation of Democratic Governor Jay Inslee, in many messages on its website. Its latest press release, dated November 1, said the state was the “national leader of an authoritarian government.”

“Throughout this COVID situation, Inslee has been out of step with the rest of the country,” Ericksen said in the statement. “He says his act of revenge was based on science, but it is certainly not science understood by public health officials and elected leaders in every other state in the Union.”

Inslee posted a declaration Saturday in response to news of Ericksen’s death, stating that he and his wife sent “our sincere condolences to the family, friends and colleagues of Senator Doug Ericksen. Our hearts are with them.”


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State senator dies month after telling local radio station he was sick with Covid-19 while in El Salvador https://colinmarshallradio.com/state-senator-dies-month-after-telling-local-radio-station-he-was-sick-with-covid-19-while-in-el-salvador-2/ Sun, 19 Dec 2021 03:46:55 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/state-senator-dies-month-after-telling-local-radio-station-he-was-sick-with-covid-19-while-in-el-salvador-2/ [ad_1] By Kay Jones, CNN Washington state senator died a month after confirming to a local radio station he was in El Salvador and sick Covid19. The family of State Senator Doug Ericksen announced his death in a statement released by the Washington State Senate Republican Caucus on Saturday, but they did not indicate the […]]]>


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By Kay Jones, CNN

Washington state senator died a month after confirming to a local radio station he was in El Salvador and sick Covid19.

The family of State Senator Doug Ericksen announced his death in a statement released by the Washington State Senate Republican Caucus on Saturday, but they did not indicate the cause of his death.

“We are heartbroken to share that our husband and father passed away on Friday, December 17. Please keep our family in your prayers and thank you for continuing to respect our privacy at this extremely difficult time,” the statement said.

Ericksen represented the 42nd district of Whatcom County, from Bellingham to the Canadian border, according to his website. He was elected to the Senate in 2010 after serving six terms in the State House, the statement said.

Ericsen told KIRO Radio in November, he contracted the virus while in El Salvador. The station’s chief information officer said in a tweet that Ericksen told them he couldn’t leave the country and that there was no monoclonal antibody treatment available.

In an email sent to Washington state lawmakers on November 11, Ericksen said he “traveled to El Salvador and tested positive for COVID shortly after (he) arrived,” and asked for help with the treatment transported to the country to help with his recovery, according to the Seattle Times, who said he obtained the email from a member of the state Senate.

Ericksen had repeatedly called for the resignation of Democratic Governor Jay Inslee, in many messages on its website. Its latest press release, dated November 1, said the state was the “national leader of an authoritarian government.”

“Throughout this COVID situation, Inslee has been out of step with the rest of the country,” Ericksen said in the statement. “He says his act of revenge was based on science, but it is certainly not science understood by public health officials and elected leaders in every other state in the Union.”

Inslee posted a declaration Saturday in response to news of Ericksen’s death, saying he and his wife sent “our deepest condolences to the family, friends and colleagues of Senator Doug Ericksen. Our hearts are with them.

The-CNN-Wire
™ & © 2021 Cable News Network, Inc., a WarnerMedia Company. All rights reserved.


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Skills World Live Radio Show special XMAS, co-presented with UK Employment Secretary Mims Davies and Tom Bewick – FE News https://colinmarshallradio.com/skills-world-live-radio-show-special-xmas-co-presented-with-uk-employment-secretary-mims-davies-and-tom-bewick-fe-news/ Fri, 17 Dec 2021 11:48:12 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/skills-world-live-radio-show-special-xmas-co-presented-with-uk-employment-secretary-mims-davies-and-tom-bewick-fe-news/ [ad_1] Check out our special Christmas schedule (!) When Tom Bewick first shared the presenter’s mic with UK Employment Minister Mims Davies MP. Prior to entering Parliament, Mims was previously a DJ on local BBC radio. So the Skills World Live production team was honored to record an episode with Mims, which focused on how […]]]>


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Check out our special Christmas schedule (!) When Tom Bewick first shared the presenter’s mic with UK Employment Minister Mims Davies MP.

Prior to entering Parliament, Mims was previously a DJ on local BBC radio. So the Skills World Live production team was honored to record an episode with Mims, which focused on how the Department of Work and Pensions worked to prevent a public health crisis from turning into jobs crisis during the pandemic.

With better than expected employment figures (4.2% unemployment), including a record number of vacancies (1.2 million) in the UK economy, Mims and Tom interviewed guests who were first line to deliver these awesome results:

Segment 1 – The response to the pandemic

Lwsi Morgan, work coach at Newtown Jobcentre, Wales
Hugh Edwards, Youth Work Coach at Newcastle City Youth Hub

Segment 2 – Offer to young people

Maddi Sweetman, Kickstarter and now Assistant Community Coach at AFC Wimbledon Foundation
Fiona Sutherland, Community Development Manager and Maddi Employer, AFC Wimbledon Foundation

Segment 3 – Helping people change careers

Claire Morley, bus driver for Stagecoach in Grimsby
Stuart, DWP work coach

Segment 4 – The role of entrepreneurs

Susanna Lawson, Founder / Ambassador of OneFile

Segment 5 – How the Rewards and Skills Ecosystem Supports Learners and Employers

David Gallagher, Member of the Board of Directors of FAB and Managing Director of NCFE
Paul Eeles, Director General, Skills and Education Group

Throughout the show, Mims and Tom shared their passion for music, playing a mix of classic Christmas songs and tracks that reminded them of the seasons past. Check out the show’s Spotify playlist on SkillsWorld Live to listen to all the tracks on the show.

This episode features tracks from:

  • DECO – Bitter Sweet Symphony (version 2021)
  • Whitney Houston – I want to dance with someone
  • Wilson Philips – Hold on
  • Shakin ‘Stevens – Merry Christmas everyone
  • A-Ha – The sun always shines on TV
  • Pan! – last Christmas

Recommend0 recommendationsPosted in Exclusive to FE News, Education, Employability, Skills and learning, Livestream and video, Podcast

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WHMI 93.5 FM radio station – Livingston County Michigan News, weather, traffic, sports, school updates and the best classic hit https://colinmarshallradio.com/whmi-93-5-fm-radio-station-livingston-county-michigan-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hit-6/ Fri, 10 Dec 2021 15:28:27 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/whmi-93-5-fm-radio-station-livingston-county-michigan-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hit-6/ [ad_1] jacoblund / iStock (NEW YORK) – As the COVID-19 pandemic swept the world, more than 5.2 million people have died from the disease worldwide, including more than 793,000 Americans, according to real-time data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Johns Hopkins University Engineering. In the United States, only 60.4% of the population […]]]>


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jacoblund / iStock

(NEW YORK) – As the COVID-19 pandemic swept the world, more than 5.2 million people have died from the disease worldwide, including more than 793,000 Americans, according to real-time data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Johns Hopkins University Engineering.

In the United States, only 60.4% of the population is fully vaccinated against COVID-19, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Here is how the news is evolving. Every hour in the East:

Dec 10, 5:25 p.m.
So far, 50 million Americans receive booster injection

More than 50 million Americans have now received a COVID-19 recall, according to recently updated federal data.

More than half of fully vaccinated people 65 years of age and older have received a booster.

On average, around 2.03 million shots in total are administered each day, according to the data. More than half – 1.1 million – are booster doses.

-Arielle Mitropoulos from ABC News

Dec 10, 3:50 p.m.
Significant growth in cases expected in much of the United States, cases could double in New York

The Philadelphia Children’s Hospital PolicyLab predicts “significant” growth in cases across much of the United States over the next four weeks.

Major metropolitan areas, especially in the Northeast, are seeing significant growth in cases after Thanksgiving, forecasters say.

Cases in the New York City area are expected to at least double through December, forecasters said.

The metropolitan areas of New Jersey, Delaware and North Carolina are expected to see rapid increases in cases, forecasters said.

Forecasters also noted a “sudden” increase in cases in Florida over the past two weeks.

-Arielle Mitropoulos from ABC News

Dec 10, 1:10 p.m.
No deaths among 43 omicron patients in the United States

There have been no deaths and one hospitalization among the 43 known omicron patients in the United States, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Early indications show that omicron may cause less severe disease than previous variants, public health experts say, but it’s still too early to say for sure. It is also possible that omicron only appears less severe because many infected people have been vaccinated, younger adults.

-Sony Salzman of ABC News

Dec 10 11:31
More than 7,400 Americans admitted to hospital with COVID every day

The United States is now reporting more than 118,000 new cases every day, up nearly 85% since the end of October, according to federal data.

On average, more than 7,400 Americans are admitted to hospital with COVID-19 every day – an increase of almost 16% last week, while pediatric hospital admissions have climbed more than 40%, according to the data.

More than 7,600 Americans died from COVID-19 last week. West Virginia currently has the highest death rate in the country, followed by Wyoming, Montana and Tennessee.

-Arielle Mitropoulos from ABC News

Dec 10, 10:04 AM
Masks or vaccination documents required in all indoor public places in New York

Masks will now be mandatory in all indoor public places in New York state, unless the business or location requires proof of full vaccination, Governor Kathy Hochul said on Friday.

The new measure goes into effect Monday and lasts at least until January 15 as the state tries to disrupt a winter wave.

New York’s seven-day average case rate has jumped 43% since Thanksgiving, according to the governor’s office.

“We shouldn’t have reached the point where we are facing a winter wave, especially with the vaccine at our disposal, and I share the frustration of many New Yorkers that we have not yet passed this pandemic,” Hochul said in a statement. “I want to thank the more than 80% of New Yorkers who did what it took to get a full vaccine. If others follow suit, these measures will no longer be necessary.”

Dec 09, 7:33 p.m.
At least 25 states have confirmed cases of omicron

At least 25 states have now reported cases of the omicron variant, just over a week after California identified the first case in the United States

Iowa, Michigan and Virginia became the last states on Thursday to confirm positive cases of the worrisome new variant.

Other states with confirmed cases include Arizona, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Illinois, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska , New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Texas, Utah, Washington and Wisconsin.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention director Rochelle Walensky told The Associated Press on Wednesday that most cases were mild, although there was at least one hospitalization.

-Arielle Mitropoulos from ABC News

09 Dec, 4:22 p.m.
The daily average of cases in the United States has increased by almost 83% since October

COVID-19-related hospitalizations in the United States have increased 47% over the past month, according to federal data. Almost 80% of adult intensive care beds are full.

The United States is now reporting more than 117,000 new cases every day. The daily average of cases has jumped nearly 83% since the end of October, according to federal data.

New Hampshire has the highest case rate in the country, followed by Michigan, Minnesota, Rhode Island, New Mexico, Indiana, Vermont, Massachusetts and New York.

-Arielle Mitropoulos from ABC News

Dec 09, 2:54 p.m.
More than 2 million children aged 5 to 11 fully immunized

More than 2 million children aged 5 to 11 are now fully immunized, said White House COVID-19 data director Cyrus Shahpar.

These children are among more than 200 million Americans of all ages who are now fully immunized, according to the White House.

Shahpar’s tweet added: “Early evidence indicates that boosters increase protection against Omicron. Get boosted!”

However, about two-thirds of parents of school-aged children delay or refuse to have their youngest children immunized, according to a survey published Thursday by the nonprofit Kaiser Family Foundation.

Parents of teenagers are more willing to get their children vaccinated, but so far only about half of this age group have been vaccinated, KFF found.

The new findings come despite growing evidence that the vaccine is safe and that children and adolescents are now helping to increase the number of cases.

Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

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