public media – Colin Marshall Radio http://colinmarshallradio.com/ Fri, 25 Mar 2022 14:18:25 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://colinmarshallradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-1-1-120x120.png public media – Colin Marshall Radio http://colinmarshallradio.com/ 32 32 WDET 101.9FM WDET is Detroit’s public radio station https://colinmarshallradio.com/wdet-101-9fm-wdet-is-detroits-public-radio-station-5/ Tue, 25 Jan 2022 21:31:22 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/wdet-101-9fm-wdet-is-detroits-public-radio-station-5/ Ryan Patrick Hooper Photographers Joey Schultz and John Mark Hanson took four trips across 50 states to capture portraits of grandmothers and ask them a simple and insightful question: “What advice would you give to your younger self?” The new photo book “Grandmothers of America” highlights the beauty of an aging population and the advice […]]]>

Ryan Patrick Hooper

Photographers Joey Schultz and John Mark Hanson took four trips across 50 states to capture portraits of grandmothers and ask them a simple and insightful question: “What advice would you give to your younger self?”

The new photo book “Grandmothers of America” highlights the beauty of an aging population and the advice they would give to their young people.

Dottie Johnson is one of dozens of grandmothers photographed for “Grandmothers of America.”

The concept is the original idea of ​​the photographer Joey Schultz, who posed the question, “What would be the most powerful photo you could take?” The answer was a portrait of her own grandmother, who launched a 50-state tour to approach random grandmothers and ask them to take their photos.

Schultz also asked the photo’s subjects a simple question: “What advice would you give to your younger self?”

Responses ranged from ‘love yourself’ to ‘don’t use drugs’, spend more time with your family and pay more attention to the needs of your children.

Schultz completed the project in four trips with fellow photographer John Mark Hanson. The book was released earlier this month.


Listen: Photographers Joey Schultz and John Mark Hanson talk about their new book “Grandmothers of America.”


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  • Ryan Patrick Hooper is CultureShift’s award-winning host and producer on NPR station 101.9 WDET-FM Detroit. As a longtime arts and culture journalist and photographer, Hooper has covered stories for NPR, Detroit Free Press, Hour Detroit, SPIN and Paste magazine.

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WDET 101.9FM WDET is Detroit’s public radio station https://colinmarshallradio.com/wdet-101-9fm-wdet-is-detroits-public-radio-station-4/ Sat, 22 Jan 2022 00:43:13 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/wdet-101-9fm-wdet-is-detroits-public-radio-station-4/ Ryan Patrick Hooper Article by Joshua Neuman for Slate — “Why isn’t Kenny Washington an American icon?” — shines a light on the little-known legacy of former football player Kenny Washington, who broke the NFL’s color barrier a year before Jackie Robinson arrived in MLB to do the same. When it comes to sports history, […]]]>

Ryan Patrick Hooper

Article by Joshua Neuman for Slate — “Why isn’t Kenny Washington an American icon?” — shines a light on the little-known legacy of former football player Kenny Washington, who broke the NFL’s color barrier a year before Jackie Robinson arrived in MLB to do the same.

When it comes to sports history, Kenny Washington is not a household name like Jackie Robinson. At least one writer wants to see that shift by telling the story of Washington becoming the first African-American soccer player to sign a professional league contract.

Joshua Neuman wrote the article “Why is Kenny Washington not an American icon?” for Slate. While Washington broke the color barrier in football a year before Robinson did the same for Major League Baseball, Neuman argues he’s often referred to as “Jackie Robinson” for a while, except the other way around.

“It’s unfair to the memory of Kenny Washington to present his desegregation from the NFL as a ‘Jackie Robinson moment’ when it’s quite the opposite.” —Josue Neuman

Robinson and Washington played sports together in college and grew up 6 miles apart in Los Angeles, but ended up with divergent careers with different sports heritages.

“Washington isn’t even in the Hall of Fame,” says Neuman, who joined CultureShift on WDET to talk about his story for Slate.


Listen: Joshua Neuman explains how Kenny Washington was upstaged by Jackie Robinson.


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  • Ryan Patrick Hooper is CultureShift’s award-winning host and producer on NPR station 101.9 WDET-FM Detroit. As a longtime arts and culture journalist and photographer, Hooper has covered stories for NPR, Detroit Free Press, Hour Detroit, SPIN and Paste magazine.

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WDET 101.9FM WDET is Detroit’s public radio station https://colinmarshallradio.com/wdet-101-9fm-wdet-is-detroits-public-radio-station-3/ Thu, 20 Jan 2022 20:59:51 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/wdet-101-9fm-wdet-is-detroits-public-radio-station-3/ Tia Graham An independent study by researchers at Michigan State University found that black drivers are stopped more than any other racial group in the state. The results also showed that black and Hispanic drivers are more likely than white and Asian drivers to be stopped after a traffic stop. Michigan State Police Superintendent Col. […]]]>

Tia Graham

An independent study by researchers at Michigan State University found that black drivers are stopped more than any other racial group in the state. The results also showed that black and Hispanic drivers are more likely than white and Asian drivers to be stopped after a traffic stop.

Michigan State Police Superintendent Col. Joe Gasper said the department would hire an outside consulting firm to address and recommend changes regarding racial disparities. Col. Gasper said in a statement, “Michigans deserve unbiased policing, transparency and accountability from their state police and that’s what they’re going to get.”

“These are just initial steps, in terms of finding the problem and removing some sort of scab from the wound, but also an opportunity to ensure that those who perpetuate these racial disparities are also held accountable for their actions. .” —John E. Johnson Jr., Michigan Department of Civil Rights

A five-point response plan was also announced as a way to turn the conversation into action. Hiring an independent contractor is one part, along with issuing body cameras to all enforcement members, making more MSP data publicly available, and increasing training opportunities for deputies.

John E. Johnson Jr. is the executive director of the Michigan Department of Civil Rights. He says it’s a good start to opening up the conversation that most black people and people of color have been talking about frankly for decades regarding the relationship between police and communities of color. “I commend Colonel Gasper for commissioning the study, and more so for even publishing its findings, which shows his boldness and transparency in leading this department.”

Johnson says releasing the information and promising to engage will help begin to lay the groundwork between the police and the public. “He and I agree that these are just the initial stages, in terms of discovering the problem and removing some kind of scab from the wound, but also an opportunity to ensure that those who perpetuating these racial disparities are also held accountable for their actions. »


Listen: Michigan Department of Civil Rights Executive Director John E. Johnson explains what the report means for the future.



John Johnson is the director of Michigan’s Department of Civil Rights.

Johnson says the numbers speak for themselves and show that “racism is still alive and well, in our society, and to some degree institutionalized.”

The data is from 2020, a time when many people were sheltering in place due to the pandemic.

“It shows me the propensity of Michigan State Police officers, even during a pandemic, when there weren’t many people on the road to still racially profile drivers of color. So it’s even more troubling,” he says.

Johnson says the Civil Rights Department has offered its help and its experts in implicit bias and cultural competency to help with the training, but “training means nothing if you don’t have the means and the will” to fight against it. systemic racism.

“Behaviour needs to be changed,” Johnson says. “And the first step in behavior modification is recognizing that your behavior needs to be changed. So it’s a state of mind. Officers need to realize that they need to change their ways and internalize that.

Johnson says he hopes it will lead other law enforcement officials to examine their own departments.

“We also hope that the study released by the Michigan State Police will encourage other law enforcement agencies to do their own internal audit, so they can see for themselves maybe what’s going on in their own backyard.”

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  • Tia Graham is a reporter and weekend edition host for 101.9 WDET. She graduated from Michigan State University where she had the unique privilege of covering former President Barack Obama and his trip to Lansing in 2014.

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WDET 101.9FM WDET is Detroit’s public radio station https://colinmarshallradio.com/wdet-101-9fm-wdet-is-detroits-public-radio-station-2/ Tue, 18 Jan 2022 23:16:38 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/wdet-101-9fm-wdet-is-detroits-public-radio-station-2/ Ryan-Patrick Hooper On view through May 31, the “Book Smugglers” exhibit highlights the courageous steps people took during the Holocaust to protect Jewish cultural memory from the Nazis and Soviets. “Would you risk your life to save a book? This is the question of the new exhibition “Book smugglers: partisans, poets and the race to […]]]>

Ryan-Patrick Hooper

On view through May 31, the “Book Smugglers” exhibit highlights the courageous steps people took during the Holocaust to protect Jewish cultural memory from the Nazis and Soviets.

“Would you risk your life to save a book?

This is the question of the new exhibition “Book smugglers: partisans, poets and the race to save Jewish treasures from the Nazis”. It is on display until May 31 at the Zekelman Holocaust Center in Farmington Hills.

It tells the story of Jewish residents who helped protect their cultural artifacts by rescuing thousands of rare books and manuscripts – first from the Nazis, then from the Soviets – by hiding them and smuggling them across borders. during the Holocaust.

The exhibit is named after a book of the same name written by David E. Fishman, who will join the museum virtually to discuss the exhibit and his book on Jan. 27 as part of the International Day of Remembrance. Holocaust.


Listen: Rabbi Eli Mayerfeld, CEO of the Zekelman Holocaust Center, talks about the significance of “The Book Smugglers” exhibit in modern times.


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  • Ryan Patrick Hooper is CultureShift’s award-winning host and producer on NPR station 101.9 WDET-FM Detroit. As a longtime arts and culture journalist and photographer, Hooper has covered stories for NPR, Detroit Free Press, Hour Detroit, SPIN and Paste magazine.

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WDET 101.9FM WDET is Detroit’s public radio station https://colinmarshallradio.com/wdet-101-9fm-wdet-is-detroits-public-radio-station/ Sun, 16 Jan 2022 15:58:24 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/wdet-101-9fm-wdet-is-detroits-public-radio-station/ Vincent Dufy The University of Michigan board of trustees voted Saturday morning to remove Mark Schlissel as president of the University of Michigan, effective immediately. The board has named former UM president Mary Sue Coleman as interim president. The University of Michigan board of trustees voted Saturday morning to remove Mark Schlissel as president of […]]]>

Vincent Dufy

The University of Michigan board of trustees voted Saturday morning to remove Mark Schlissel as president of the University of Michigan, effective immediately. The board has named former UM president Mary Sue Coleman as interim president.

The University of Michigan board of trustees voted Saturday morning to remove Mark Schlissel as president of the University of Michigan, effective immediately. The board has named former UM president Mary Sue Coleman as interim president.

The vote comes after an investigation into whether Schlissel had an inappropriate relationship with a university employee. The investigation found that over a period of years, Schlissel had used his university email account to communicate with this subordinate “in a manner inconsistent with the dignity and reputation of the university”. Regents said members learned of the relationship through an anonymous complaint in December 2021.

The university has released dozens of emails that illustrate the inappropriate conduct, as well as the letter sent to Schlissel explaining Regents’ decision.

In the letter, the Regents write: “Paragraph IB of your agreement clearly states that ‘(your) conduct and behavior must at all times be consistent with the promotion of the dignity, reputation and academic excellence of the ‘University’. The Regents claim that the facts uncovered in the investigation show that Schlissel materially violated this obligation.

Former UM President Mary Sue Coleman said in a written statement, “Although saddened by the circumstances, I am honored to be asked to serve the University of Michigan again. When I left the UM campus at the end of my presidency in 2014, I declared that serving this great university was the most rewarding experience of my professional life. I am pleased to serve again in this important interim role.

Schlissel became president of the university in 2014. He had planned to step down in 2023.

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  • Vincent Duffy has served as Michigan Radio‘s news director since May 2007. During his years as head of Michigan Radio’s newsroom, the news team has won numerous national, regional and state awards, including Murrow award, Sigma Delta Chi awards, a duPont award and others. .

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Lakeshore PBS, Lakeshore Public Radio to broadcast Indiana State State Speech https://colinmarshallradio.com/lakeshore-pbs-lakeshore-public-radio-to-broadcast-indiana-state-state-speech/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 02:42:59 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/lakeshore-pbs-lakeshore-public-radio-to-broadcast-indiana-state-state-speech/ [ad_1] Lakeshore PBS and Lakeshore Public Radio will broadcast Indiana Governor Eric Holcomb’s state-of-the-state address live on Tuesday, January 11 at 6 p.m. ET. Lakeshore PBS broadcasts on Channel 56 live as well as on DirecTV, Dish Network and AT&T U-verse. Comcast Xfinity viewers can find Lakeshore PBS on channel 17 or 21. The live […]]]>


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Lakeshore PBS and Lakeshore Public Radio will broadcast Indiana Governor Eric Holcomb’s state-of-the-state address live on Tuesday, January 11 at 6 p.m. ET.

Lakeshore PBS broadcasts on Channel 56 live as well as on DirecTV, Dish Network and AT&T U-verse. Comcast Xfinity viewers can find Lakeshore PBS on channel 17 or 21. The live broadcast can also be viewed online at LakeshorePBS.org or through the free PBS video app.

Lakeshore Public Radio can be streamed on 89.1 FM, online at LakeshorePublicRadio.org, as well as through many streaming apps like Alexa, Spotify, TuneIn Radio, and iTunes.

“Northwest Indiana is often overlooked in Chicagoland’s television and radio landscape, which makes it even more vital that Lakeshore make this state-of-the-state speech so easily accessible to keep local residents informed. what’s going on with our state government, ”Lakeshore Public Media President and CEO, James A. Muhammad, said.

Each year, the Governor of Indiana addresses both houses of the state legislature, state Supreme Court justices, and other heads of state at the start of the legislative session in the speech on the state of the state. The speech gives the governor the opportunity to report on the state of state affairs, highlight the major accomplishments of the past year, and set priorities for the year ahead.

Lakeshore PBS will rebroadcast the State of the State speech on Sunday, Jan.16 at 9 a.m., followed by the State of Judicial 2022 broadcast at 10 a.m.

Lakeshore Public Media has been a public broadcasting entity based in Northwest Indiana for almost 35 years. Lakeshore Public Media operates both Lakeshore PBS and Lakeshore Public Radio. The nonprofit organization’s mission is to enrich the lives of residents of Chicagoland and Northwest Indiana through lifelong learning, celebration of human diversity and engagement in civic concerns.

More information, including full program schedules, is available at LakeshorePBS.org or LakeshorePublicRadio.org.

Looking to advertise? Contact the Crusader for more information.

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WKAR Presents New Mid-Air Jazz Radio Show in Michigan https://colinmarshallradio.com/wkar-presents-new-mid-air-jazz-radio-show-in-michigan/ Wed, 15 Dec 2021 14:05:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/wkar-presents-new-mid-air-jazz-radio-show-in-michigan/ [ad_1] Michael Stratton hosts “A Groove Supreme” Saturdays at 8:00 p.m. from New Year’s Day EAST LANSING, Michigan – WKAR Public Media in Michigan State is launching a new jazz radio show on New Years Day. A Supreme Groove presents two hours of jazz every Saturday evening, hosted by Michael Stratton. A Supreme Groove debuts […]]]>


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Michael Stratton hosts “A Groove Supreme” Saturdays at 8:00 p.m. from New Year’s Day

EAST LANSING, Michigan – WKAR Public Media in Michigan State is launching a new jazz radio show on New Years Day. A Supreme Groove presents two hours of jazz every Saturday evening, hosted by Michael Stratton.

A Supreme Groove debuts at 8 p.m. ET on Saturday, Jan. 1, 2022 on WKAR 90.5 FM from East Lansing. The program is also being broadcast live at that time on wkar.org. Full moon hacksaw, previously broadcast in the 8 p.m. spot, goes on at 10 p.m.

Mid-Michigan jazz fans will know Stratton for his many years as the host of The midnight vinyl side, heard on LCC Radio WLNZ until recently, when the station changed formats.

A Supreme Groove will retain the same eclectic aesthetic that defined my previous show, with themes from various genres and a strong jazz core, ”Stratton said. “Jazz is not just a genre of music. The various permutations and mixtures are endlessly fascinating, filled with love, friction and transcendence. “

“I’m so happy that we were able to call on Michael to add two extra hours of locally hosted music to our week,” said Jamie Paisley, radio programming director for WKAR. “With our classic programming, Folk with Matt Watroba, and now A Supreme Groove, our listeners really appreciate having a host who can make a local connection to the music they love. “

At WKAR, Stratton brings back a long tradition of locally hosted jazz from 90.5 FM. Longtime fans will remember the hours spent listening with WKAR hosts Dan Bayer and Doug Collar.

“I am really excited about the launch of A Supreme Groove on WKAR, ”said Drew Henderson, senior director of broadcast operations for WKAR. “Many listeners have been touched by the recent changes in Lansing Radio. This show gives us the opportunity to strengthen local ties and keep jazz available on Lansing radios and beyond. WKAR has served central Michigan for nearly a century, and we look forward to strengthening our local news and music offerings in 2022. Stay tuned for more. “

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Minnesota Briefs: Public Television Duluth Adds Radio Station To Its Mix https://colinmarshallradio.com/minnesota-briefs-public-television-duluth-adds-radio-station-to-its-mix/ Sat, 04 Dec 2021 14:03:29 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/minnesota-briefs-public-television-duluth-adds-radio-station-to-its-mix/ [ad_1] A radio station founded by students at the University of Minnesota at Duluth 65 years ago is now part of the Duluth-Superior Area Public Television Organization. As of December 1, the former KUMD has been known as North 103.3, operating under the call letters WDSE. Its FM frequency, 103.3, remains the same. The station […]]]>


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A radio station founded by students at the University of Minnesota at Duluth 65 years ago is now part of the Duluth-Superior Area Public Television Organization. As of December 1, the former KUMD has been known as North 103.3, operating under the call letters WDSE. Its FM frequency, 103.3, remains the same.

The station was purchased from the university by the Duluth-Superior Area Educational Television Corporation, the region’s nonprofit PBS subsidiary, commonly identified as WDSE-WRPT.

“Through our combined organizations, we see this as an opportunity to build deeper connections to tell even more compelling stories that reflect our diverse and unique communities,” said Patricia Mester, President and CEO of WDSE-WRPT. “Together, we will provide our region with a comprehensive and trustworthy public media experience.” The purchase price was not disclosed.

The station was founded in 1956 by UMD students as the first alternative media in northern Minnesota and Wisconsin. For decades, it has enabled students to learn all facets of radio. These opportunities will continue and can now be extended to television, Mester said.

With university budgets tight, the school felt that citizens and students would be better served by integrating the radio station‘s assets into the larger public media organization, UMD Chancellor Lendley Black said.

There will be no immediate changes to the station’s programming and format, officials said in a press release, and the current staff will remain in place. Opportunities for UMD students to get involved with the station are expected to continue, including work both on air and behind the scenes.

JEAN REINAN

WAIT PARK

Ledge Amphitheater Gears Up For Season 2

After putting on a strong inaugural season with concerts by the Beach Boys, Dropkick Murphys and 311 – as well as a private concert with Willie Nelson – the Ledge Amphitheater in Waite Park is gearing up for its second season.

This week, officials announced that the Goo Goo Dolls will perform on Monday, September 12, as part of the group’s 2022 summer tour. Tickets went on sale for the show, which also includes Blue October, on Friday.

Last month, GREAT Theater announced that it will be launching its 25th season July 21-23 with “Grease” at the amphitheater. The theater company produced its first outdoor show – “Rodgers & Hammerstein’s Cinderella” – this summer at the amphitheater. Waite Park town officials have committed to having a BIG theater production at the amphitheater each July.

The $ 15 million amphitheater opened this summer after a year of delay due to the pandemic.

JENNY BERG

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The Atomic Age Cocktail Party radio show will air in January: Music: Smile Politely https://colinmarshallradio.com/the-atomic-age-cocktail-party-radio-show-will-air-in-january-music-smile-politely/ Tue, 30 Nov 2021 14:00:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/the-atomic-age-cocktail-party-radio-show-will-air-in-january-music-smile-politely/ [ad_1] When I was a curious teenager in the 1970s and wanted to learn music, the public library was my teacher. Armed with a library card, I studied the excellent record collection in the Champaign Public Library. It was there that I made discoveries that will influence my musical tastes for the rest of my […]]]>


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When I was a curious teenager in the 1970s and wanted to learn music, the public library was my teacher. Armed with a library card, I studied the excellent record collection in the Champaign Public Library. It was there that I made discoveries that will influence my musical tastes for the rest of my life.





There was no section intact, but my favorite section was the “soundtracks” because this section taught me the most. I discovered classical music thanks to the 2001 soundtrack: A Space Odyssey. The American Graffiti album was a great introduction to rock and roll. Fellini’s Armacord soundtrack introduced me to Nino Rota, Clint Eastwood’s spaghetti westerns introduced me to Ennio Morricone, and the Pink Panther films introduced me to Henry Mancini (why were these great 20th century composers all Italian origin ?).

Album cover scan provided by Jason Croft.

It was also in the library that I fell in love with the great singers of a bygone era – Sarah Vaughn, Dinah Washington, Doris Day, and more. So when I stumbled across Jason Croft’s “Bachelor Pad Radio Show” on WEFT and heard my teenage favorites again, I became an instant fan. It was on Jason’s show that I gained new respect for what I thought was called the “easy listening” genre, but now it has a cool new name – “lounge”. Then, a few months ago, when Jason announced the end of his WEFT show, I panicked and started downloading his setlists. Fortunately, Jason also announced that he is moving his show to WILL-FM in January and aiming for national syndication. I wanted to know more, so I emailed Jason asking him about his new show and future plans.

Poster by Kurt Bielema.

Smile politely: How did you come up with the name “The Atomic Age Cocktail Party?” “

Jason Croft: It’s actually the name of an old DJ party I did at Cowboy Monkey about 15 years ago. During these concerts, I would pull out my collection of living room records, put on a tuxedo jacket, and sing tunes to the people of the Monkey. Some people didn’t know what to think of it. But those who love it absolutely loved it. I always thought that was a good name and that it perfectly describes the type of music I play.

SP: What kind of music are you going to play?

Small farm: It goes by many names – lounge, exotic, private jazz, Rat Pack, Space Age Bachelor Pad Music. It’s mid-20th century American popular music. Think of it as a post-big band through the Beatles and rock and roll domination. Of course you’ll hear people like Sinatra, Dean Martin, Julie London, Henry Mancini, Les Baxter, Perez Prado, Esquivel, etc., but I’m also going to dive deep into this music to hopefully play stuff that people haven’t heard a thousand times before.

Album cover scan provided by Jason Croft.

SP: How is this show different from your “Bachelor Pad Radio Show” on WEFT?

Small farm: I am super proud of my journey there for almost twenty years. As I told the fans of this show, they are going to feel right at home with this new show. The big difference they’ll hear is the weekly theme. Each episode of “The Atomic Age Cocktail Party” will revolve around a specific idea. It can be a concept or a sub-genre of the featured music or instrument. So every song I play is tied to the larger program. So it will be less free and more structured.

SP: What are some of these “ideas” that you have in mind?

Small farm: To reveal a secret to you, I worked upstream and I have already produced about ten programs. In January, when the show debuts, we’ll be featuring travel shows, cocktail songs, bongo music, Johnny Mercer’s lyrics and a fun show I call “naming names”. At first, when I first presented the program, I put together a list of about 60 different show themes from the top of my head. I always offer more too. And I bet once the show gets off to a good start, other ideas will start coming in. So, I’m not afraid to run out of show ideas anytime soon.

SP: Why the switch from WEFT to WILL?

Small farm: Earlier this year, WILL re-added jazz to its weekend lineup with NPR’s “Jazz Night In America” ​​program. I thought “The Atomic Age Cocktail Party” would be a good companion for this. The time seemed to have come to present it to the powers-that-be of Illinois Public Media (the organization that runs AM580, FM 90.9 and WILL-TV). They must have heard something they liked since they gave me the green light to do it.

SP: Are there any other shows like this?

Small farm: Yeah. There aren’t many, but there are still a few of us who keep the lounge burning alive with our radio shows. I often chat with other animators and programmers. We like to exchange music and talk shop. Many of these shows are based on community radio stations. Some sound more commercial. I would like to think what I do is on the finer, more professional side of the spectrum.

SP: How come you know so much about this kind of music?

Small farm: I fell into it by accident. At the end of the 1990s, there was what was called the “Lounge Revival”. People are rediscovering the music and style of the 1950s and early 1960s. The movie Swingers is a good example. There was also this amazing collection released by Capitol Records called Ultra-Lounge. He hit the right time for many of us Gen-Xers. The grunge was over and I think we were all looking for something new musically. And there was a certain charm to this music from our grandparents. There was this style and this aesthetic that were close and yet so far away. All that Mid-Century Modern vibe. It was cool and sophisticated and upbeat and leaning into a whole new future. Just soaked in cocktails, cool clothes and all that stereophonic music. It’s fun to see that now, considering the difference back then was only about 40 years. It would be like rediscovering the 80s today.

SP: What is your personal relationship to this musical genre?

Small farm: Well, it’s hard not to live with this music for over two decades and not be affected by it. This is the stuff that always floats in my head. And I had the chance to meet people who also love this same kind of music: musicians, show hosts, collectors, etc. Sometimes I think of all this great music like an ocean. You can swim all the way through, but you can also do those deep dives and really find more wealth below the surface.

Album cover scan provided by Jason Croft.

SP: Tell us about your favorite artist from this period.

Small farm: I have to laugh a little at that. Because I could spend ten minutes listing my favorites and why. And then tomorrow I might have a whole new list for you. They all have great stories, which I try to address here and there in the new program. But if there’s one artist I think most people associate with me, it’s the man I like to call the “King of Space Age Bachelor Pad Music,” Mr. Juan Garcia Esquivel. I used his song “Mini-Skirt” to open every episode of “The Bachelor Pad Radio Show” on WEFT. His music is fun and quirky, but completely solid and polished. Maybe that’s a good way to think about how I approach what I do.

SP: Are there contemporary artists who bring this genre back to life?

Small farm: Oh, there are tons! It’s a small but powerful group of people who keep this music alive. In fact, I’m planning on doing a show called “21st Century Lounge” soon. There are big groups like The Martini Kings, The Tiki Delights, Don Tiki, Waitiki, Stolen Idols, Project Pimento, ÃŒxtahuele, etc. Plus many great modern crooners. Who does not know Michael Bublé or the duets of Lady Gaga and Tony Bennett? And while I don’t really play with modern surf bands, you could totally throw them in the retro category. So there are a lot of them. You just need to know where to look.

SP: What is the difference between “Lounge” and “Easy Listening”?

Small farm: Now, you can think of them as one and the same. I use the terms interchangeably. But if you want a more nuanced definition, this is it: “Lounge” music was the music played in cocktail bars. Think of crooners and bands that had nightclub concerts. “Easy Listening” was more light recorded music intended to be played on the hi-fi system or on beautiful music radio stations. One is supposed to be in front, the other fade into the background.

SP: Do you really have to drink cocktails while listening to your show?

Small farm: OK, here’s another deep and dark secret for you. I am a teetotaler. My favorite drink is usually a cup of coffee. But I encourage people to have a cocktail when they’re listening to the show. It usually makes me sound better!

SP: Your long term goal is national syndication. How is it going ?

Small farm: My plan for the show is to offer it to other community and public radio stations. There is something called the Public Radio Exchange where the show producers can offer content. We can either go that way or look at the distribution in another way.

SP: One hour for a radio show is not very long. Do you intend to extend the duration of the show?

Small farm: I think I’ll stick to the old showbiz adage that “always leave them wanting more”! One hour on a particular topic is more than enough. Also, the shows will be available on demand on the website after they air on the radio so people can listen to them again and again. And I plan to produce a lot of episodes of “The Atomic Age Cocktail Party”, so there should be a lot to listen to soon.

Album cover scan provided by Jason Croft.

SP: You obviously do this for fun. Do you also have a day job?

Croft: I’m the audio production manager at Illinois Public Media, so producing and hosting this show is now part of my day-to-day job … station needs.

SP: What else do you do besides working on radio shows?

Small farm: I have a lot of other projects and hobbies. And those who know me probably already know what they are.

SP: When and where can we listen to the program? Will the show be streamed or available as a podcast?

Small farm: Starting January 1, the show will air Saturday evenings at 11 a.m. with a reminder Sunday evenings at 10 a.m. on WILL-FM, 90.9 in Urbana. It will be available on request on atomicagecocktailparty.com or on the WILL site.

SP: Is there anything else you want our readers to know about your show?

Small farm: I think people should grant it. But then again, I’m biased since it’s my show. I try to present this kind of music in an original and interesting way. Somewhere over the years “lounge” has had a bad reputation. I try to show people that this music is still important and entertaining. My hope is to open up this style of music to a whole new audience and make them love it as much as I do.

Top image designed by Kurt Bielema.

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How could COP26 affect Mountain West? https://colinmarshallradio.com/how-could-cop26-affect-mountain-west/ https://colinmarshallradio.com/how-could-cop26-affect-mountain-west/#respond Sun, 07 Nov 2021 23:49:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/how-could-cop26-affect-mountain-west/ [ad_1] The United Nations Climate Conference, or COP26, is underway in Glasgow, Scotland. The global agreements reached there aim to limit the negative effects of climate change, such as drought and extreme fires, which are already apparent in the west of the mountain. But will it have more immediate impacts on the region? According to […]]]>


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The United Nations Climate Conference, or COP26, is underway in Glasgow, Scotland. The global agreements reached there aim to limit the negative effects of climate change, such as drought and extreme fires, which are already apparent in the west of the mountain. But will it have more immediate impacts on the region?

According to Morgan Bazilian, director of the Payne Institute for Public Policy at the Colorado School of Mines, the short-term effects are likely to come from people in Scotland who are not directly involved in the negotiations.

“Almost all of these 25,000 people (who should be at COP26) are not participating in the actual negotiations within the UN framework,” Bazilian said. “About 5% of the people who show up there are actually related to the negotiations.”

He said there would likely be more meetings outside of the formal conference as new partnerships are formed and announcements are made.

“President Biden announced a methane regulation rule for the United States while in Glasgow,” he said. “It has nothing technically to do with the climate change conference.”

This policy in particular could affect oil and gas throughout the region. The president has ordered the EPA to crack down on the leaks and will demand stricter regulations for the oil and gas industry nationwide.

The proposed methane rule was expected well in advance of the conference, and many pointed to Colorado as a framework for these regulations. New Mexico has also cracked down on methane emissions, with more regulations passed last year.

Another thing to watch out for at COP26, Bazilian said, is a trade deal for so-called “green” or “clean” steel. Those who already produce steel with lower emissions could benefit, such as the steel mill in Pueblo, Colorado, which is largely solar powered starting this month.

“It’s between the United States and the European Union, but it would have broader implications for world steel trade,” he said.

But COP26 is just a larger reflection on how the world views emissions and climate change, and feelings about it could affect energy industries and trade across the West.

Bazilian noted that the Biden administration made a very public decision to send 12 members of the U.S. cabinet with the president at the top, possibly more representation than any other nation in the world.

“It was done, I believe, for the sake of perspective and to show the big shift in priorities between the Biden administration and the Trump administration,” he said. “The audience for this type of ‘show of force’ – as they called it themselves – are the American people.”

COP26 is expected to continue until November 12.

This story was produced by the Mountain West News Bureau, a collaboration between Nevada Public Radio, Wyoming Public Media, Boise State Public Radio in Idaho, KUNR in Nevada, the O’Connor Center for the Rocky Mountain West in Montana , KUNC in Colorado, KUNM in New Mexico, with the support of affiliate stations across the region. Funding for the Mountain West News Bureau is provided in part by the Public broadcasting company.

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