public radio – Colin Marshall Radio http://colinmarshallradio.com/ Wed, 16 Mar 2022 10:18:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://colinmarshallradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-1-1-120x120.png public radio – Colin Marshall Radio http://colinmarshallradio.com/ 32 32 Missouri radio station still airs Kremlin programming, even as Russia invades Ukraine https://colinmarshallradio.com/missouri-radio-station-still-airs-kremlin-programming-even-as-russia-invades-ukraine/ Wed, 16 Mar 2022 10:18:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/missouri-radio-station-still-airs-kremlin-programming-even-as-russia-invades-ukraine/ Tune in to 11:40 a.m. or 102.9 FM in Kansas City and you might hear Jarmarl Thomas pontificate about the motives behind the Russian invasion of Ukraine on his show Fault Lines. The week of March 7, Thomas spent much of the three-hour show painting Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy as the instigator of the Russian […]]]>

Tune in to 11:40 a.m. or 102.9 FM in Kansas City and you might hear Jarmarl Thomas pontificate about the motives behind the Russian invasion of Ukraine on his show Fault Lines.

The week of March 7, Thomas spent much of the three-hour show painting Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy as the instigator of the Russian invasion, blaming the Ukrainians and the United States.

“Zelenskyy is not the overflowing, brilliant hero that the West made him out to be,” Thomas said. “It’s the narrative that’s needed to solidify that idea, it’s unprovoked.”

Fault Lines is a show featured on Radio Sputnik, broadcast programming produced in Washington DC and funded by the Kremlin. The show airs regularly on KCXL, a small station in Liberty, Missouri, which can be heard for miles in all directions.

Radio Sputnik’s account of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine stands in stark contrast to most reporting on the ongoing conflict, portrayed largely as an unprovoked attack on Ukrainians led by Russian President Vladimir Putin.

KCXL and Washington DC station WZHF-AM Air Radio Sputnik daily. A handful of other stations also pick up these broadcasts.

    Pete Schartel says he fulfilled a childhood dream when he bought his first <a class=radio station in 1994.” srcset=”https://npr.brightspotcdn.com/dims4/default/1dd37ae/2147483647/strip/true/crop/1760×1174+0+0/resize/1760×1174!/quality/90/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fnpr.brightspotcdn.com%2F24%2Fe5%2Fb847ab804754a94ddce5eea1bf69%2Fschartel-sputnik-haxel.jpg 2x” width=”880″ height=”587″ src=”https://npr.brightspotcdn.com/dims4/default/e5757e3/2147483647/strip/true/crop/1760×1174+0+0/resize/880×587!/quality/90/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fnpr.brightspotcdn.com%2F24%2Fe5%2Fb847ab804754a94ddce5eea1bf69%2Fschartel-sputnik-haxel.jpg” loading=”lazy” bad-src=”data:image/svg+xml;base64,PHN2ZyB4bWxucz0iaHR0cDovL3d3dy53My5vcmcvMjAwMC9zdmciIHZlcnNpb249IjEuMSIgaGVpZ2h0PSI1ODdweCIgd2lkdGg9Ijg4MHB4Ij48L3N2Zz4=”/>

Pete Schartel says he fulfilled a childhood dream when he bought his first radio station in 1994.

As the Russian invasion of Ukraine rages on, scrutiny from Kremlin-sponsored media like Radio Sputnik continues to intensify. And for KCXL owner Pete Schartel, that scrutiny comes in the form of renewed pressure to stop airing programs that keep the radio station going.

Since the beginning of the Russian invasion, companies around the world have regularly ceased their relations with Russia. Roku and DirecTV last week, Russian state-controlled RT, formerly known as Russia Today, was dropped. This prompted RT to close its US branch and lay off most US staff.

In Russia, outlets like CNN and the New York Times withdraw journalists from the country following a censorship law signed by Putin that threatens up to 15 years in prison for spreading “false information”.

“Extremely Unusual”

Earlier this month, in response to the invasion, National Association of Broadcasters (NAB) chief executive Curtis LeGeyt called on all U.S. broadcasters to cease all state-sponsored programming with ties to the Russian government.

NAB’s chief legal officer, Rick Kaplan, said the move was “extremely unusual” but necessary.

He said the broadcasts produced by Radio Sputnik amounted to nothing more than propaganda that disseminated misinformation from a foreign government about the invasion of the United States.

“It’s different from the discourse, which is very important to have — open, all points of view on the table. There’s a line between that and direct propaganda.”

Rick Kaplan, National Association of Broadcasters

“[There’s] there’s a lot of misinformation going on, generally speaking, in our country and around the world – I think that’s an important statement.

Schartel called NAB’s request a “gut reaction” that trampled on KCXL’s freedom of speech and led to a maelstrom of angry calls to the station, calling Schartel and his wife Jonne “traitors.”

“If I did (cut the program), we would be doing exactly the main thing that we criticize the former Soviet Union and other communist regimes for doing where they don’t allow free speech,” Schartel said. .

And it’s not just free speech that worries Schartel. He said that without the monthly revenue from the deal with Radio Sputnik, the station would probably not be able to stay open.

In exchange for airing Radio Sputnik’s programs, Schartel earns $5,000 a month to air six hours of Radio Sputnik in two blocks, 6 a.m. to 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. daily at 11:40 a.m. 102.9 FM and 104.7 FM.

“Something We Could Live With”

Ahead of the 2020 deal with the Russian government, Schartel said he was struggling to keep his small radio station on the air on a shoestring budget.

“It felt like something we could live with,” Schartel said. “Especially if they could pay us and keep the rest of the station on the air.”

U.S. Justice Department Foreign Agents Registration Act (FARA) filings show RM Broadcasting paid Schartel’s company more than $160,000 to carry Radio Sputnik programming over the past two years .

Arnold Ferolito of Florida-based RM Broadcasting brokered the deal between Rossiya Segodnya, a Kremlin-run media agency in Russia, and KCXL in 2020.

In 2017, Ferlito brokered a similar deal with WZHF-AM and unsuccessfully purchased programming from stations in larger markets like New York and Los Angeles.

Two years later, as investigations continued into foreign influence in the 2016 election, the Justice Department ordered Ferolito to register as a foreign agent with FARA.

Congress first passed FARA in 1938 to combat Nazi propaganda in the run-up to World War II.

At the time, Ferolito told KCUR 89.3 that he was a businessman “caught in the middle of a political problem.” He fought the Justice Department’s order in court without success.

After U.S. District Court Judge Robin L. Rosenberg upheld the ruling, the Justice Department said in a statement that the information Ferolito and RM Broadcasting transmitted to the U.S. airwaves lacked transparency.

“The American people have a right to know if a foreign flag is flying behind speech broadcast in the United States,” the statement said. “Our concern is not the content of the speech but the transparency of the true identity of the speaker.

Yet Ferolito continues to profit from the agreements between Rossiya Segodnya and the radio stations, as long as the stations continue to broadcast Radio Sputnik. According to documents filed by FARA, Ferolito earned a small percentage of the more than $1.6 million the Russian government paid to KCXL and WZFH.

Ferolito did not give an interview to the Midwest Newsroom, but in a statement, RM Broadcasting “stands with Ukraine and the victims of oppression and aggression around the world” and argued that shutting down Radio Sputnik’s programming in the United States would be a blow to freedom of expression.

“Alternative Radio”

Radio Sputnik isn’t the only controversial programming on KCXL, due to what Schartel has said is his love of “alternative radio.”

KCXL also airs TruNews, a show The Anti-Defamation League says regularly features anti-Semitic, Islamophobic and anti-LGBTQ messages and in 2018 Schartel gave airtime to Steve West, a Clay County Republican candidate for the Missouri House of Representatives who was denounced by his party and family for espousing bigotry.

The station has supporters like Kevin Phillips, a KCXL listener for 20 years.

The self-proclaimed conspiracy researcher said he was listening because Schartel airs programs that other stations avoid.

“Whenever people tried to get their news out there and couldn’t be heard anywhere else, he (Pete) would give them space on the air,” Phillips said. “Pete never limited the topics.”

Phillips said he gets a good deal of his news from sources such as Radio Sputnik and RT. He said he didn’t mind the Russian programming funding.

“If you’ve been following Ukraine’s history for 20 years like me, you’ll find a lot more truth on Russian pay radio than on American radio,” Phillips said.

Schartel plans to continue broadcasting Radio Sputnik shows for as long as they are available, but his contract with RM Broadcasting and Rossiya Segodnya ends in December 2022. He does not expect it to be renewed.

This story comes from the Midwest Newsroom, an investigative reporting collaboration including IPR, KCUR 89.3, Nebraska Public Media News, St. Louis Public Radio and NPR.

Copyright 2022 KCUR 89.3

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Melody Walker, public radio producer and STLPR reporter, dies https://colinmarshallradio.com/melody-walker-public-radio-producer-and-stlpr-reporter-dies/ Fri, 11 Mar 2022 23:26:07 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/melody-walker-public-radio-producer-and-stlpr-reporter-dies/ Longtime public radio journalist and producer, wonderful friend, loving mother, sister and partner Melody Walker died of cancer at home on March 4. She was 62 and lived in the Central West End neighborhood of St. Louis. Walker comes from several generations of pioneering Midwestern journalists and editors. She began reporting at the age of […]]]>

Longtime public radio journalist and producer, wonderful friend, loving mother, sister and partner Melody Walker died of cancer at home on March 4.

She was 62 and lived in the Central West End neighborhood of St. Louis.

Walker comes from several generations of pioneering Midwestern journalists and editors. She began reporting at the age of 10 for her father, Hayes Walker III, who published the cattle magazine, The Hereford Journal.

She became a radio journalist in Kansas City at age 16.

Walker graduated from Barnard College with a degree in philosophy and, as a student, was invited by CBS veteran Fred Friendly to work with him on a PBS series. She ran the news department for WKCR, Columbia University’s radio station, overseeing a team of 40 reporters. She’s done everything from covering the United Nations General Assembly to producing live jazz shows from clubs in the Morningside Heights neighborhood.

Walker has had a distinctive and award-winning career in public radio. As soon as she graduated from Barnard, she brought her fluency in French and her journalism skills to Europe.

As a reporter for NPR in France, Walker covered a series of terrorist attacks in Paris in the 1980s.

In the early 1980s, Walker reported from Paris for NPR, Deutsche Welle and Radio France, among others. She has covered the terrorist attacks, French politics, the champagne trade, the 40th anniversary of D-Day and the Cannes Film Festival.

There, she was discovered by a film producer and chosen to play Joan of Arc in a TV movie. Walker has also produced various jazz and classical concerts in the United States and Europe for distribution by Ofreidia, a French production company.

031122_provided_melodywalker_06.jpeg

Walker produced the “Lenny Lopate Show” at the WNYC and also covered political stories as a reporter.

Walker returned to the United States and became lead producer for the “Lenny Lopate Show” at the WNYC.

In 1989, she was hired as New York and later Chicago bureau chief for the public radio business program “Marketplace.” During this time she had her two children, Kyle and Blair, whom she later raised in Chicago, Paris, New York and St. Louis.

031122_provided_melodywalker_07.jpeg

Walker in the summer of 2021 with his partner, John Barth (left), daughter, Blair O’Brien (center left) and son, Kyle O’Brien.

“Melody was a gifted reporter with great storytelling skills and a sense of humor that made the eyes and ears of all who enjoyed her reporting shine,” recalls “Marketplace” founding executive producer Jim Russell. “I remember best his colorful reporting from France – hearing him was almost as good as being there yourself.”

Walker also wrote and produced commentary for renowned CBS Radio personality Charles Osgood. She was proud of her one-on-one interviews with Amazon’s Jeff Bezos; Thomas Watson, then CEO of IBM, and publisher Malcolm Forbes.

In St. Louis, Walker handled marketing communications for St. Louis University and Washington University’s Olin Business School.

She returned to public radio briefly in 2018 as a business and economic development reporter for St. Louis Public Radio.

Melody Walker wears red glasses and large over-ear headphones and speaks into a St. Louis Public Radio microphone in a radio studio.

Evie Hemphill

/

St. Louis Public Radio

Walker, a former economic development reporter for St. Louis Public Radio, joined “St. Louis on the Air” as a guest in November 2018.

She balanced her professional accomplishments with civic duty. Walker has served as an officer and board member of the Central West End Association and STL Village, an on-site seniors service and advocacy organization.

Walker loved France and all things French, Halloween, dinner parties, perfect croissants, champagne, the Missouri Botanical Garden, tending his own garden and greenhouse, spying on bunnies and butterflies. She was happier in Paris and New York.

She is survived by her two children, Kyle Walker O’Brien of Paris and Blair Walker O’Brien of Manhattan; his partner, John Barth of St. Louis; his mother, Claudette; and his sister, Hayley, and brother-in-law Jack Rees of Kansas City. And also Cooper, from Manhattan, the only dog ​​she ever loved.

His family says loved ones can honor his life by making donations to Village STL or the Missouri Botanical Garden.

A celebration of Walker’s life will be held in June.

This recollection was written by John Barth, partner of Melody Walker and veteran of public and commercial radio.

]]>
Colorado Inmates Begin Broadcasting on America’s First Statewide Prison Radio Station – The Burlington Record https://colinmarshallradio.com/colorado-inmates-begin-broadcasting-on-americas-first-statewide-prison-radio-station-the-burlington-record/ Sat, 05 Mar 2022 12:56:15 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/colorado-inmates-begin-broadcasting-on-americas-first-statewide-prison-radio-station-the-burlington-record/ LIMON — Audio producers and on-air talent crammed into the makeshift studio on Tuesday, adjusting levels and donning headphones as they prepared to launch Colorado’s new radio station. “Launch Day!” shouted a producer as the staff cowered in front of the microphones, a palpable hum permeating the windowless room. Large white posters hung on a […]]]>

LIMON — Audio producers and on-air talent crammed into the makeshift studio on Tuesday, adjusting levels and donning headphones as they prepared to launch Colorado’s new radio station.

“Launch Day!” shouted a producer as the staff cowered in front of the microphones, a palpable hum permeating the windowless room. Large white posters hung on a nearby wall detailing the new station’s mission, values ​​and impacts.

“In an artistic space”, said a poster, “there are no failures”.

It’s not Colorado Public Radio or Hits 95.7. This is Limon Correctional Facility, a sprawling Level IV prison in the Eastern Plains of Colorado that houses more than 700 inmates behind a 4,000 foot long double perimeter fence.

Inside plexiglass walls, surrounded by soundproof foam, a collection of giddy men in green jumpsuits presented Inside Wire: Colorado Prison Radio, the first state-run radio station in U.S. history on Tuesday. be recorded and produced inside prison walls and transmitted to anyone with an internet connection anywhere in the world.

“Returning to the community makes us worth again as human beings,” said Anthony Quintana, 51, who has spent the past 33 years behind bars for murder but has been invigorated by his new role as engineer and director of operations for the burgeoning radio station.

Inside Wire, the first statewide prison radio station, launched on March 1, 2022 inside the Limon Correctional Facility.

The program’s goal is to change the narrative of the more than 14,000 people housed in Colorado prisons.

“It’s a truly monumental moment,” Ashley Hamilton, executive director and co-founder of the University of Denver’s Prison Arts Initiative, told the audience.

The idea had been in the making for a year and a half, born in the depths of the COVID-19 pandemic. In November 2020, DU and the Department of Corrections launched A/LIVE Inside, a virtual showcase for incarcerated artists and storytellers to share their work from Colorado prisons. Program staff realized they could use the closed-circuit system inside the prisons to broadcast the event.

“We thought, ‘What else could we do? ‘” Hamilton said. She pitched the idea to Dean Williams, executive director of the Colorado Department of Corrections.

The head of the state’s corrections system took office in 2019 with a reform-minded vision, promising to “normalize” life behind bars. Williams green-lit a podcast recorded in Colorado prisons, as well as an inmate-run newspaper and a touring production of “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.”

Colorado Prison Radio, Williams told the Denver Post, is a continuation of that normalization movement.

“It’s about making prison more human,” Williams said after taping.

Limon Correctional Facility inmate Anthony Quintana...
Limon Correctional Facility inmate Anthony Quintana, who has been in prison for 33 years, now works at the prison’s first statewide radio station as the station’s engineer and manager. of operations on March 1, 2022. Quintana hung family photos and other decorations on the wall where he works at the prison radio station, called Inside Wire.

The executive director appeared on Tuesday’s kickoff show and plans to appear on a weekly show called ‘Up to the Minute with Dean Williams’, in which incarcerated residents will talk to him about anything and everything.

The station, funded by the DU Prison Arts Initiative, operates 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and includes musical programs, conversations between inmates and correctional staff, and an audio message board for Department residents. correctional services.

The station is not actually broadcast on AM or FM radio, but can be streamed online or through the Inside Wire app. It is also broadcast to every cell in Colorado’s 21 correctional facilities via closed-circuit televisions.

Jody Aguirre, 58, had never played with audio until he signed on as Inside Wire’s engagement producer and host of a Tuesday morning music show.

He first went to prison in 1994 for murder and served a stint in solitary confinement. There is no release date on the horizon.

“When you come here you lose hope,” Aguirre said.

But after spending 10 years angry and bitter, Aguirre made a promise to his mother: “I will live to make her proud.”

He took a creative writing course, and now he mixes 80s new wave, deep house and jazz on his Tuesday radio show.

“People here live honorable lives,” Aguirre said.

Inmate Herbert Alexander, who was...
Inmate Herbert Alexander, pictured at Limon Correctional Facility on March 1, 2022, is the production manager for a new prison radio station. Alexander took a moment outside the sound booth before heading back inside to help the station, called Inside Wire, kick off its opening schedule.

Herbert Alexander, 46, can’t stop talking to his family outside the new radio station.

The rumor mill inside the prison is strong, he said. So Alexander, who is the production manager of Inside Wire, is particularly excited about the show with Williams to give residents real information about new legislation or policies that affect them on a daily basis.

“A lot of guys don’t know about this information,” Alexander said. “We’re giving you Dean’s voice.”

Alexander has been incarcerated for 13 years for aggravated robbery and is eligible for parole within the next two years. He hopes to use his DU certificate in audio production to find work in this field once back outside.

“Most offenders go home at some point,” Alexander said outside the studio. “So when they do, don’t we want them to be better men?”

The incarcerated men gathered in a room after the show was taped on Tuesday, waving and shouting via video to their fellow radio hosts inside the Sterling Correctional Facility and the Denver Women’s Correctional Facility, where broadcasts will also be recorded and produced. (All shows are pre-recorded and reviewed before they hit the airwaves, though Hamilton says they didn’t have to remove content from any of the taped shows before this week’s debut.)

As he watched from the back of the room, Seth Ready became emotional. This project is personal to Ready, who spent 18 years behind bars but now works for the DU Prison Arts Initiative as a communications associate.

Darrius Turner, an inmate at Limon Correctional Facility,...
Limon Correctional Facility inmate Darrius Turner works at the Inside Wire radio station from inside the prison on March 1, 2022.

“It’s been one of the best days of my life,” he told the men and women on the video call.

Finally, it was time to hear the final product, the culmination of a year of work.

The intro music came on the computer and Quintana couldn’t help but giggle as she took a bite of her fruit salad. Cheers filled the prison library. Quintana waved her fist, smiling broadly. Hamilton let out a deep exhaled sigh.

Alexandre’s voice swept over the airwaves: “We have a vision: To create something by us, for us.

Quintana shouted, “That’s the hook!” as he sang on the chorus: “Inside…inside…the wire!”

Alexandre soaks up the moment.

“Knowing that everyone can hear it,” he said afterward, “is like, wow.”

]]>
Colorado inmates launch first US statewide prison radio station https://colinmarshallradio.com/colorado-inmates-launch-first-us-statewide-prison-radio-station/ Fri, 04 Mar 2022 01:06:47 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/colorado-inmates-launch-first-us-statewide-prison-radio-station/ LIMON — Audio producers and on-air talent crammed into the makeshift studio on Tuesday, adjusting levels and donning headphones as they prepared to launch the new Colorado radio station. “Launch Day!” shouted a producer as the staff cowered in front of the microphones, a palpable hum permeating the windowless room. Large white posters hung on […]]]>

LIMON — Audio producers and on-air talent crammed into the makeshift studio on Tuesday, adjusting levels and donning headphones as they prepared to launch the new Colorado radio station.

“Launch Day!” shouted a producer as the staff cowered in front of the microphones, a palpable hum permeating the windowless room. Large white posters hung on a nearby wall detailing the new station’s mission, values ​​and impacts.

“In an artistic space”, said a poster, “there are no failures”.

It’s not Colorado Public Radio or Hits 95.7. This is Limon Correctional Facility, a sprawling Level IV prison in the Eastern Plains of Colorado that houses more than 700 inmates behind a 4,000 foot long double perimeter fence.

Inside plexiglass walls, surrounded by soundproof foam, a collection of giddy men in green jumpsuits presented Inside Wire: Colorado Prison Radio, the first state-run radio station in U.S. history on Tuesday. be recorded and produced inside prison walls and transmitted to anyone with an Internet connection anywhere in the world.

“Returning to the community makes us worth again as human beings,” said Anthony Quintana, 51, who has spent the past 33 years behind bars for murder but has been invigorated by his new role as engineer and director of operations for the burgeoning radio station.

Inside Wire, the first statewide prison radio station, launched on March 1, 2022 inside the Limon Correctional Facility.

The program’s goal is to change the narrative of the more than 14,000 people housed in Colorado prisons.

“It’s a truly monumental moment,” Ashley Hamilton, executive director and co-founder of the University of Denver’s Prison Arts Initiative, told the audience.

The idea had been in the making for a year and a half, born in the depths of the COVID-19 pandemic. In November 2020, DU and the Department of Corrections launched A/LIVE Inside, a virtual showcase for incarcerated artists and storytellers to share their work from Colorado prisons. Program staff realized they could use the closed-circuit system inside the prisons to broadcast the event.

“We thought, ‘What else could we do? ‘” Hamilton said. She pitched the idea to Dean Williams, executive director of the Colorado Department of Corrections.

The head of the state’s corrections system took office in 2019 with a reform-minded vision, promising to “normalize” life behind bars. Williams green-lit a podcast recorded in Colorado prisons, as well as an inmate-run newspaper and a touring production of “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.”

Colorado Prison Radio, Williams told the Denver Post, is a continuation of that normalization movement.

“It’s about making prison more human,” Williams said after taping.

Limon Correctional Facility inmate Anthony Quintana...
Limon Correctional Facility inmate Anthony Quintana, who has been in prison for 33 years, now works at the prison’s first statewide radio station as the station’s engineer and manager. of operations on March 1, 2022. Quintana hung family photos and other decorations on the wall where he works at the prison radio station, called Inside Wire.

The executive director appeared on Tuesday’s kickoff show and plans to appear on a weekly show called ‘Up to the Minute with Dean Williams’, in which incarcerated residents will talk to him about anything and everything.

The station, funded by the DU Prison Arts Initiative, operates 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and includes musical programs, conversations between inmates and correctional staff, and an audio message board for Department residents. correctional services.

The station is not actually broadcast on AM or FM radio, but can be streamed online or through the Inside Wire app. It is also broadcast to every cell in Colorado’s 21 correctional facilities via closed-circuit televisions.

Jody Aguirre, 58, had never played with audio until he signed on as Inside Wire’s engagement producer and host of a Tuesday morning music show.

He first went to prison in 1994 for murder and served a stint in solitary confinement. There is no release date on the horizon.

“When you come here you lose hope,” Aguirre said.

But after spending 10 years angry and bitter, Aguirre made a promise to his mother: “I will live to make her proud.”

He took a creative writing course, and now he mixes 80s new wave, deep house and jazz on his Tuesday radio show.

“People here live honorable lives,” Aguirre said.

Inmate Herbert Alexander, who was...
Inmate Herbert Alexander, pictured at Limon Correctional Facility on March 1, 2022, is the production manager for a new prison radio station. Alexander took a moment outside the sound booth before heading back inside to help the station, called Inside Wire, kick off its opening schedule.

Herbert Alexander, 46, can’t stop talking to his family outside the new radio station.

The rumor mill inside the prison is strong, he said. So Alexander, who is the production manager of Inside Wire, is particularly excited about the show with Williams to give residents real information about new legislation or policies that affect them on a daily basis.

“A lot of guys don’t know about this information,” Alexander said. “We’re giving you Dean’s voice.”

Alexander has been incarcerated for 13 years for aggravated robbery and is eligible for parole within the next two years. He hopes to use his DU certificate in audio production to find work in this field once back outside.

“Most offenders go home at some point,” Alexander said outside the studio. “So when they do, don’t we want them to be better men?”

The incarcerated men gathered in a room after the show was taped on Tuesday, waving and shouting via video to their fellow radio hosts inside Sterling Correctional Facility and the Denver Women’s Correctional Facility, where broadcasts will also be recorded and produced. (All shows are pre-recorded and reviewed before they hit the airwaves, though Hamilton says they didn’t have to remove content from any of the taped shows before this week’s debut.)

As he watched from the back of the room, Seth Ready became emotional. This project is personal to Ready, who spent 18 years behind bars but now works for the DU Prison Arts Initiative as a communications associate.

Darrius Turner, an inmate at Limon Correctional Facility,...
Limon Correctional Facility inmate Darrius Turner works at the Inside Wire radio station from inside the prison on March 1, 2022.

“It’s been one of the best days of my life,” he told the men and women on the video call.

Finally, it was time to hear the final product, the culmination of a year of work.

The intro music came on the computer and Quintana couldn’t help but laugh as she took a bite of her fruit salad. Cheers filled the prison library. Quintana waved her fist, smiling broadly. Hamilton let out a deep exhaled sigh.

Alexandre’s voice swept over the airwaves: “We have a vision: To create something by us, for us.

Quintana shouted, “That’s the hook!” as he sang on the chorus: “Inside…inside…the wire!”

Alexandre soaks up the moment.

“Knowing that everyone can hear it,” he said afterward, “is like, wow.”

]]>
“The Inside Man” APR 40th Anniversary encore presentation https://colinmarshallradio.com/the-inside-man-apr-40th-anniversary-encore-presentation/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 12:11:27 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/the-inside-man-apr-40th-anniversary-encore-presentation/ Alabama Public Radio celebrates its fortieth anniversary this year. Throughout 2022, the APR news team will present encore shows from the best of the best in our award-winning national stories. Our last dates from last year. Vladimir Putin’s war on Ukraine stands in stark contrast to what parents in the former Soviet nation of Belarus […]]]>


Alabama Public Radio celebrates its fortieth anniversary this year. Throughout 2022, the APR news team will present encore shows from the best of the best in our award-winning national stories. Our last dates from last year. Vladimir Putin’s war on Ukraine stands in stark contrast to what parents in the former Soviet nation of Belarus did in 1999 and 2000. That was when parents in this former communist country trusted outsiders to Alabama to shelter their children after the Chernobyl nuclear power plant disaster in 1986. Here is a further introduction to part two of APR’s series titled “From Chernobyl, to Bama, and back.”

In April, we met with the Lee family from the town of Pelham. They took in a 9-year-old boy from the Belarusian nation in the year 2000. Belarus is just north of where the Chernobyl power plant exploded in 1986. It’s also where a lot of radioactive fallout has drifted . Alabama Public Radio and the University of Alabama Public Television Center collaborated on the story about how children from Belarus were brought to our state for visitation beginning in the late 1990s. Here’s how it all started.

“He was pretty shy around us, for quite a while,” said Susan Lee of Pelham, Alabama.

Susan Lee and Ivan Kouvalieu in the year 2000

“He was always happy. He was a boy. He had a mischievous side. But, it was still fun and happy,” Lee said of Ivan.

He was only 10 years old when he traveled to Alabama in 2000, and at that time he spoke no English. Ivan Kovaliou and kids like him flew to Alabama from the former Soviet nation of Belarus. After changing planes in Frankfurt, New York and Atlanta, they boarded buses for a two-hour journey to Birmingham.

They all look a little tired as they wave to the camera for this 20-year-old video. Everyone wears a red baseball cap. The organizers didn’t want them to get lost in the crowd waiting for them.

kids_arrive_1_b_1.jpg

Belarusian children arrive in Birmingham

When each child gets off the bus, they are greeted by families holding signs with slogans like Welcome to Alabama written in Russian. At first, the young people wearing their red caps are grouped in one group, and their host families in the other. Everyone seems a little uncertain about what’s next. Then, little by little, everyone is paired up. Instead of taking the kids, the families spread blankets on the grass near the parking lot for a picnic to get to know each other. In his case, Lee knew that Ivan had come a long way for this all-American lunch, and why.

“It wasn’t until many years later that I realized the magnitude of the disaster and the long term impact it had…and continues to have…and will continue to have…for years to come. come,” she said.

Ivan and these other young people are known as the Children of Chernobyl. About 60% of the Soviet nation of Belarus was contaminated by the nuclear power plant disaster. Thyroid cancer cases have increased tenfold in areas affected by the Chernobyl fallout. This includes young people of Ivan’s age at the time.

london_times_chernobyl_panorama.jpg

The United Methodist Church created the Children of Chernobyl program in Alabama. This meant free medical care and a chance for these young people to be safe from the threat of radiation. Still, Lee said it meant a big leap of faith for Ivan’s parents to let him come.

“I don’t know if I could do that, for my kids,” Lee said. “I don’t know if I could send them somewhere without knowing someone who would have to… take care of them.” And yet his parents trusted us infinitely to be his second parents.

Church leaders in Alabama also knew it was a big ask. And they needed someone who knew Russia firsthand to lead the way.

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“As I had lived there before and been involved in different projects, I felt I could add something to that,” said Patrick Friday.

Friday was in seminary to become a Methodist minister in Alabama. But that wasn’t the only thing on his resume. Friday produced documentaries for Alabama Public Television and wrote stories for CNN. And, there was one more thing.

“I went, right out of college, with a group called Education for Democracy,” Friday said. “So my job was to be available in the Baltic countries. To help. It was still the Soviet Union. And people were interested in ‘What is democracy?’ ‘What is freedom?’

That was before the fall of communism in 1991. Today, Friday was back in the post-Soviet nation of Belarus on a more delicate mission. These tottering children may soon be heading to the United States. But on Friday, they would first have to convince their parents. Friday asked local leaders what he could do to build trust that could lead to the Children of Chernobyl program. They said to bring winter coats for the kids.

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Patrick Friday delivers coats that could participate in the Children of Chernobyl program

He shot a video in 1996 while carrying large clear plastic bags into a house. They were full of coats donated by parishioners in Alabama. First, a little girl of about 5 years old shows up. Friday rummages in his bag like a skinny young Santa Claus. He pulls out a small blue coat with a plaid lining. The little customer tries it on and responds with a smile.

An older girl, named Sasha, stays behind. She seems uncertain. Friday pulls out a black coat and holds it. He gets no reaction. More digging leads to a purple jacket with patches of green and black. Sasha seems to be warming up to this one. She tries it on and keeps it.

Many meetings and many coats later, the crowds around Friday began to swell. A local school even hosted a reception. The children were dressed in white. Their costumes are embroidered in red and green, the national colors of Belarus. And there are a lot of intros. The parents spoke on Friday about their children, where they went to school and what they like to do. Some would drop soft hints, as if he would be no problem.

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Young Belarusians perform folk songs and dances at a reception for Patrick Friday

“And that’s when we said we were looking forward to having them come to us,” Friday said, “to fly to Alabama and stay with us.”

But, despite the smiles, handshakes and songs, Friday knew a tough time was coming. It was then that these families gathered at the main airport in the Belarusian capital of Minsk to say goodbye.

“Think of your own children, say they are 7 or 8 years old, in a foreign country to people you don’t know. So that was the look on their face,” Friday said.

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The public radio show and podcast “Selected Shorts” gets the first permanent host in a decade. | story https://colinmarshallradio.com/the-public-radio-show-and-podcast-selected-shorts-gets-the-first-permanent-host-in-a-decade-story/ Thu, 24 Feb 2022 19:15:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/the-public-radio-show-and-podcast-selected-shorts-gets-the-first-permanent-host-in-a-decade-story/ Selected Shorts has a new host. The public radio and podcast series, created by Symphony Space, tapped author Meg Wolitzer to become the show’s first permanent host since the death of Symphony Space founder Isaiah Sheffer in 2012. After a decade of writers and artists serving as host of events on the show, those duties […]]]>

Selected Shorts has a new host. The public radio and podcast series, created by Symphony Space, tapped author Meg Wolitzer to become the show’s first permanent host since the death of Symphony Space founder Isaiah Sheffer in 2012. After a decade of writers and artists serving as host of events on the show, those duties will fall to Wolitzer, whose own stories have been interpreted on the show. She has written bestsellers such as “The Wife”, “The Interestings” and “The Female Persuasion”.

“We are thrilled to welcome Meg as the new host of Shorts selectedsaid Kathy Landau, executive director of Symphony Space in the announcement. “She brings deep connections to the show and the world she celebrates, explores and unpacks. Meg’s intelligence, passion and warmth will infuse our radio show and podcast with a new spirit and serve as an invitation open to our listeners to join us and to the conversation sparked by the powerful combination of short stories and extraordinary actors.

Selected Shorts offers a range of content from literature, film, theater and comedy. Episodes hosted by Wolitzer will debut in March. New podcast episodes are released every Thursday.

Wolitzer says she has long been an avid Selected Shorts listener and has had her own stories performed for the series by actors Blythe Danner and Jill Eikenberry.

“I think stories are like a stock cube of life, it’s a little concentrate of what’s going on in the world. And by listening to stories and reading them, you understand the world better. I don’t know what I would do without this kind of work,” Wolitzer said. “[Selected Shorts] unlike anything else I’ve heard before. The idea of ​​talking to actors and writers and listening to these stories and being a part of them is exciting to me. The actors bring something to it that you can’t necessarily hear when you say it in your head, and this marriage of actors and writers was made in heaven for me.

Selected Shorts was born in Symphony Space in 1985 and launched the performance literature genre, soon spawning the weekly radio show, heard on public radio stations nationwide and on the podcast.

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The public radio show and podcast “Selected Shorts” gets the first permanent host in a decade. | Daily News Podcast https://colinmarshallradio.com/the-public-radio-show-and-podcast-selected-shorts-gets-the-first-permanent-host-in-a-decade-daily-news-podcast/ Tue, 22 Feb 2022 16:40:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/the-public-radio-show-and-podcast-selected-shorts-gets-the-first-permanent-host-in-a-decade-daily-news-podcast/ Selected Shorts has a new host. The public radio and podcast series, created by Symphony Space, tapped author Meg Wolitzer to become the show’s first permanent host since the death of Symphony Space founder Isaiah Sheffer in 2012. After a decade of writers and artists serving as host of events on the show, those duties […]]]>

Selected Shorts has a new host. The public radio and podcast series, created by Symphony Space, tapped author Meg Wolitzer to become the show’s first permanent host since the death of Symphony Space founder Isaiah Sheffer in 2012. After a decade of writers and artists serving as host of events on the show, those duties will fall to Wolitzer, whose own stories have been interpreted on the show. She has written bestsellers such as “The Wife”, “The Interestings” and “The Female Persuasion”.

“We are thrilled to welcome Meg as the new host of Shorts selectedsaid Kathy Landau, executive director of Symphony Space in the announcement. “She brings deep connections to the show and the world she celebrates, explores and unpacks. Meg’s intelligence, passion and warmth will infuse our radio show and podcast with a new spirit and serve as an invitation open to our listeners to join us and to the conversation sparked by the powerful combination of short stories and extraordinary actors.

Selected Shorts offers a range of content from literature, film, theater and comedy. Episodes hosted by Wolitzer will debut in March. New podcast episodes are released every Thursday.

Wolitzer says she has long been an avid Selected Shorts listener and has had her own stories performed for the series by actors Blythe Danner and Jill Eikenberry.

“I think stories are like a stock cube of life, it’s a little concentrate of what’s going on in the world. And by listening to stories and reading them, you understand the world better. I don’t know what I would do without this kind of work,” Wolitzer said. “[Selected Shorts] unlike anything else I’ve heard before. The idea of ​​talking to actors and writers and listening to these stories and being a part of them is exciting to me. The actors bring something to it that you can’t necessarily hear when you say it in your head, and this marriage of actors and writers was made in heaven for me.

In addition to a new host, a book called “Small Odysseys: Selected Shorts Presents 35 New Stories” will also be released next month. The news was commissioned by Symphony Space and will be featured in a free live event scheduled for March 26 in New York City.

Selected Shorts was born in Symphony Space in 1985 and launched the performance literature genre, soon spawning the weekly radio show, heard on public radio stations nationwide and on the podcast.

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A children’s radio show goes online to tell the story of the South West https://colinmarshallradio.com/a-childrens-radio-show-goes-online-to-tell-the-story-of-the-south-west/ Sat, 19 Feb 2022 22:02:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/a-childrens-radio-show-goes-online-to-tell-the-story-of-the-south-west/ Katie Stone has worked with the radio show “The Children’s Hour” for over two decades. In 2018, she started The Children’s Hour Inc., a non-profit organization that produces the internationally broadcast children’s public radio show and podcast. Beginning at 10 a.m. on March 14, the radio show will begin a six-part Southwestern history online series […]]]>

Katie Stone has worked with the radio show “The Children’s Hour” for over two decades.

In 2018, she started The Children’s Hour Inc., a non-profit organization that produces the internationally broadcast children’s public radio show and podcast.

Beginning at 10 a.m. on March 14, the radio show will begin a six-part Southwestern history online series titled “A Brief History of the American Southwest for Children,” featuring a virtual excursion into White Sands National Park.

“We are blessed to be able to speak and work with guests on this program,” Stone said. “I’ve expanded what ‘Kids Hour’ is and can partner with teachers to create radio shows together.”

Katie Stone

Stone says she works with Title I schools and works with at-risk children.

“The skills they can take away from working on the program are the ones that help build confidence,” she says.

Stone says the upcoming project is to partner with native students so New Mexico’s history can be explored through their stories.

In the first episode, Stone says the story begins around 23,000 years ago at White Sands National Park, with a series of fossilized footprints.

Fossilized footprints in White Sands National Park are said to be over 23,000 years old. (David Bustos/White Sands National Park)

“The discovery of these footprints puts humans in this area long before we originally thought,” Stone says. “What’s great is that the footprints found near White Sands are those of a teenager.”

Stone will be joined by White Sands National Park resource program manager David Bustos and archaeologist Mary Weahkee of the New Mexico Office of Archaeological Studies.

Teachers and students from Native American Community Academy and the Native American Community Academy (NACA) Inspired Schools Network will participate, with plenty of opportunities for questions and discussions with our experts, as they lay out the story of our region, evidenced by footprints deep inside White Sands National Park.

The public will be able to view the events on a live YouTube stream.

Chaco Canyons Pueblo Bonito is one of the places “Kids Hour” will highlight. (Courtesy of Robert Parisot)

“We hope this project connects children to the rich and enduring history of the American Southwest,” says Stone, who also serves as executive producer of “The Children’s Hour.” “We want to create an enduring program to share the remarkable stories of endurance, perseverance, resilience and ingenuity that created the place we call home today.” Each episode will include a learning guide that meets New Mexico and national educational standards.

Find the full program and more information at childrenshour.org/history.

Stone says the children are integral to the production of “The Children’s Hour” and take part in the aired arts training program each week.

The radio show is broadcast on more than 120 stations worldwide.

“Kids’ Hour” airs at 9 a.m. Saturdays on KUNM-FM.

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StoryTown radio show will feature musical guest Ubunibi-Afia Short https://colinmarshallradio.com/storytown-radio-show-will-feature-musical-guest-ubunibi-afia-short/ Wed, 16 Feb 2022 19:02:58 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/storytown-radio-show-will-feature-musical-guest-ubunibi-afia-short/ Contributing photo • Short film Ubunibi-Afia From staff reports The StoryTown radio show will celebrate Black History Month on Monday, Feb. 28 at 7 p.m. at the McKinney Center in a production that will feature stories and skits about the lives and contributions of local African Americans in Jonesborough and throughout the East Tennessee area, […]]]>
Contributing photo • Short film Ubunibi-Afia

From staff reports

The StoryTown radio show will celebrate Black History Month on Monday, Feb. 28 at 7 p.m. at the McKinney Center in a production that will feature stories and skits about the lives and contributions of local African Americans in Jonesborough and throughout the East Tennessee area, all drawn from oral histories collected through the StoryTown initiative.

The fascinating lives of regional citizens Mary Katherine Williams, Mary Alexander, Alfred Greenlee, Nancy Robinson, Pastor Danny Johnson and many more will be featured on stage by the cast of the radio show.

Special, seen most recently in Anne G’Fellers-Mason’s one-woman show “Nancy”, and in the original musical “Welcome to Marfa”. Short, who first appeared on StoryTown last year, wowed audiences with her moving rendition of Nina Simone’s “I’m Feeling Good.”

Tickets are $10 and are available online at Jonesborough.com/tickets or by calling the Jonesborough Visitor Center at (423) 753-1010. Season passes for this year’s StoryTown radio show are also on sale. A pass guarantees a spot at this popular event, which often sells out in advance.

This project is funded in part by a grant from the Tennessee Arts Commission.

The award-winning Jonesborough StoryTown radio show and podcast is interpreted as a story-filled radio performance of yesteryear at the McKinney Center. The production airs on local public radio station 89.5 FM the last Wednesday of the month, with bi-monthly podcasts on www.storytown.simplecast.com. These productions celebrate the culture, history and stories of the people of Jonesborough and the southern Appalachian region. Since 2011, the show has been performed by a multicultural cast of local actors, storytellers and musicians, creating an audio patchwork of what it’s like to be at home in the mountains of Tennessee.

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India’s first radio broadcast on Prime Minister’s ‘Mann Ki Baat’, recalling World Radio Day trip https://colinmarshallradio.com/indias-first-radio-broadcast-on-prime-ministers-mann-ki-baat-recalling-world-radio-day-trip/ Sun, 13 Feb 2022 11:08:29 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/indias-first-radio-broadcast-on-prime-ministers-mann-ki-baat-recalling-world-radio-day-trip/ Radio is a powerful medium to celebrate humanity in its diversity and provides a platform for democratic discourse. It remains one of the most popular media platforms in the world. Radio can shape a society’s experience of diversity because of its unique ability to reach large audiences and serve as a platform for all voices […]]]>

Radio is a powerful medium to celebrate humanity in its diversity and provides a platform for democratic discourse. It remains one of the most popular media platforms in the world. Radio can shape a society’s experience of diversity because of its unique ability to reach large audiences and serve as a platform for all voices to be heard and represented. Radio stations serve diverse communities, offer a variety of programs, opinions and content, and reflect the diversity of their audiences through their organizations.

According to several international studies, radio remains one of the most trusted and widely used media in the world. Therefore, the theme for the 2022 edition of World Radio Day has been decided to be “Radio and Trust”.

In honor of World Radio Day 2022, UNESCO calls on radio stations around the world to commemorate the 11th edition of this event and over a century of radio. The World Radio Day sub-themes are Trust in Radio Journalism, Trust and Accessibility and Trust and Sustainability of Radio Stations.

Initial phase of radio in India

The Radio Club broadcast the first radio program in India in June 1923. Daily broadcasts included music and talk for two or three hours each day.

Nevertheless, the stations were forced to close in 1927 due to lack of financial support. The next step was to establish a broadcasting service, which began broadcasting in Bombay in July 1927 and in Calcutta a month later under an agreement between the Indian government and the Indian Broadcasting Company Ltd.

India’s first radio station was established in Delhi on June 8, 1936. The term “All India Radio” was coined by Sir Lionel Fielden on June 8, 1936. A former senior BBC producer, he worked as a broadcast controller in India for five years. and was one of the eminent persons to establish All India Radio (AIR).

India’s national public radio station, All India Radio (AIR), is officially known as Akashvani. It is the largest radio network in the country and the world and offers a variety of programs such as drama section, FM section, national service, etc.

All India Radio Signature Tune

A brand new melody was also introduced in the same year. AIR’s signature tune was based on Raag Shivaranjini and was composed by Walter Kaufman, a Czech Jew who fled Europe in fear of Nazi onslaught. In 1934 he came to India and lived in Bombay for twelve years, where he worked in the music department of AIR. While there, he conducted extensive research on Indian music and even worked on Hindi films.

AIR – the largest media organization

AIR has become one of the largest media organizations in the world, thanks to its phenomenal growth. With a network of 262 radio stations, AIR reaches nearly 92% of the national population and almost all of its territory. The popularity of the radio station only grew over time. PM Modi’s “Mann Ki Baat” is now available on AIR.

Also Read: From Top Industrialist to Banning Market by SEBI, What Led to Downfall of Anil Ambani?

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