radio program – Colin Marshall Radio http://colinmarshallradio.com/ Fri, 25 Mar 2022 14:18:38 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://colinmarshallradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-1-1-120x120.png radio program – Colin Marshall Radio http://colinmarshallradio.com/ 32 32 ZOON DAB: radio show that ruled the hearts of the Kashmiri people https://colinmarshallradio.com/zoon-dab-radio-show-that-ruled-the-hearts-of-the-kashmiri-people/ Sat, 05 Mar 2022 19:39:30 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/zoon-dab-radio-show-that-ruled-the-hearts-of-the-kashmiri-people/ When there was no concept of internet or television in Kashmir, Zoon Dab – a radio show that created a connection with the people, misses the people who were its avid listeners. Rising Kashmir feature Saba Khan connected with those listeners and some artists who worked in Zoon Dab and descended into the past for […]]]>

When there was no concept of internet or television in Kashmir, Zoon Dab – a radio show that created a connection with the people, misses the people who were its avid listeners.

Rising Kashmir feature Saba Khan connected with those listeners and some artists who worked in Zoon Dab and descended into the past for Kashmir to relive those moments.

Fatima Syed, 72, from Rainawari region of Srinagar used to listen to Zoon Dab drama regularly. She said, “I used to look forward to the drama which aired at 9am. All the participants who played in this program were very talented. For us, it was like the story of every home.

She attaches good memories to it that she has never forgotten. “I took many verses and poems from the drama. The advice that the artists would give in the program, I learned a lot.”

Having memorized the poem, laktu matu tayar koth from Zoon Dab, she then passed it on to her grandson.

“If it is rebroadcast, today’s generation will surely appreciate it for its rich language and valuable advice,” she added.

The radio program, which was once listened to in every household in the valley, is no longer broadcast on the radio today. The popular program would be broadcast on Radio Kashmir and all listeners would be glued to their radio sets.

Zoon Dab has been on the air for over twenty years and radio being the only source of entertainment for most people has added to its popularity.

An entertainment and infotainment show was led by the old school broadcasters whose voice captured a good number of fans from all corners of the valley.

Fatimasa says all the ladies in the neighborhood would be eager to listen to her and try to finish their chores before time.

“Not just the women, even the men couldn’t help but listen to her. The drama was presented in the pure Kashmiri language which was its beauty and that is what is missing today. The child of today does not understand pure Kashmiri language,” she said.

Zoon Dub performer Ashok Kak, who played the role of Ismala, said he was in 7and year when he had the chance to participate in the show.

“The script was written by Pushkar Ban, Somnath Sadu and sometimes Farooq Nazki,” he said.

Launched in 1966 as a family show, the show shed light on the daily problems of Kashmiri people related to electricity, roads, water and other issues. It was broadcast continuously until 1986, but due to the death of some artists, some of them having retired or being transferred, it ceased to be broadcast.

About the popularity of the drama, he said that the artists gained huge fame through the drama. Recalling the time in 1987 when he went to the DC office for verification, he was asked about his work in the famous drama.

“It was the time when people listened to the radio a lot, now it’s time for television and the internet. People have lost interest in radio,” he said.

He also said that if Zoon Dub airs on the current channel, it will catch people’s attention again.

Later when Ashraf Sahil became the director of Radio Kashmir, he asked Shamshad Karlwari who was the program director of Radio Kashmir to start the Zoon Dub.

Speaking to Shamshad Kralwari, he said, “Zoon-Dub is the drama in which we produce the link between broadcasting institutions and the listener.”

“During his tenure as Chief Minister, Ghulam Mohammad Sadiq directed his officials to listen to the Zoon dab and work immediately on resolving issues that were highlighted in the program,” Kralwari said, adding “We maintained the decorum of the program when it was restarted under the leadership of Ashraf Sahil.

Meanwhile, Pushkar ban, Nayeema Akhtar and Maryum Begum also worked for its revival. However, after two and a half years, Kralwari was transferred and the program was once again terminated.

In 1973, three Zoon Dab artists including Somnath Sadu, Maryum Begum and Pushkar Ban were awarded the “Padam Shree”.

Zoon Dab Story

While talking about how the Zoon Dab program was launched on the raids, Bashir Arif, former Deputy Director General of Radio Kashmir said, “On September 6, 1965, war started between India and Pakistan. Kashmiri listened to the Pakistani bulletin every morning at 7:30. It was a daily routine for people in Kashmir. The aim of the program was to get people out of the clutches of the Pakistani newsletter.

At that time in Kashmir, director Nandh Lal Chawla was the first broadcaster to introduce public service broadcasting. Before that, there was only entertainment, information, education and news on the radio. It was his brainchild that introduced the program, in which we discussed and solved the problem of the people.

“Chawla had good relationship with Chief Minister Ghulam Mohammad Sadiq who issued the order on the issues raised and discussed in Zoon Dub, redress for the same issue should be dealt with on the same day. related to electricity, water, roads and other civic amenities.This is the main reason for its popularity,” said Bashir Arif.

Once this program aired at 7:30 a.m. on October 3, 1966, people stopped listening to the Pakistani bulletin.

The first characters that were introduced in Zoon Dub were Somnath Sadu as Agh sahib, Maryam begum as Agh bai and also Ghulam Nabi Baba was the first artist who worked as a housekeeper in this feature film.

“In February 1967, Pushkar Ban was introduced as Ma’am Pip Ji, a new character in zoon’s dub. I started in January 1967 as a child artist (Nazir Lala) in this feature film “, said Bashir Arif.

In 1971 Pushkar Ban went to Australia to train and on behalf of his humorous character Farooq Nazki was featured as Ramb Lala and also Ashok Kak as Ismail.

The script of the drama was mainly written by Somnath Sadu, Pushkar Ban, Farooq Nazki, Bashir Arif, and later Ali Mohammad lone and Akhtar Mohiuddin also wrote the script.

The program became popular and everyone who was stationed in other parts of India was invited to start a program like Zoon Dab where the public complaint was discussed.

Zoona Dab was revived in 2012 when Bashir Aarif took over as deputy general manager of Radio Kashmir Srinagar. New characters have been introduced. Bashir Aarif acted as Nazir Lala, Shahida Parveen as his wife, Ashok kak as Ismala and Rashid Barqi as Zoona-Dab tenants.

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Noonan’s new radio show is looking to make waves https://colinmarshallradio.com/noonans-new-radio-show-is-looking-to-make-waves/ Fri, 18 Feb 2022 00:50:49 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/noonans-new-radio-show-is-looking-to-make-waves/ By Marcus Uhe Michelle Anne Noonan’s new Casey Radio program brings her love of poetry to the airwaves of the Southeast. Ms. Noonan launched ‘Poets Corner’, an hour of poetic power on Sunday afternoons in January, featuring emerging creators from across the region to showcase their skills and discuss the art. Ms Noonan has been […]]]>

By Marcus Uhe

Michelle Anne Noonan’s new Casey Radio program brings her love of poetry to the airwaves of the Southeast.

Ms. Noonan launched ‘Poets Corner’, an hour of poetic power on Sunday afternoons in January, featuring emerging creators from across the region to showcase their skills and discuss the art.

Ms Noonan has been writing poetry since she was a child, growing up immersing herself in Shakespeare and the language of Old English, despite the extra research needed to find out what she was actually reading.

She led a poetry group called “Poetry Pastures” and wrote several books, including “Silence Speaks Beauty” and “Sensual Whispers.”

“I love writing poetry, going out in the middle of the weekend, laying out a picnic rug and just writing,” Ms Noonan said of her relationship with literacy.

“Throughout high school, I wrote a lot of poetry. I wrote poems for people in relationships when they didn’t know what to say to their partner.

Ms. Noonan coordinates the animation of the show as a volunteer around her full-time professional commitments in customer relations.

Each week, the show seeks to highlight a different topic; Her first show coincided with January 26 and was Australia Day themed, and in the coming weeks her show will highlight love (February 20), hilarious rhymes (February 27), Mental Health Awareness (March 6) and Independent Poets (March 13).

One of the show’s goals is to promote the use of poetry as an effective coping mechanism for people struggling with their mental health.

Ms Noonan hopes children and teenagers will follow her lead and start putting pen to paper, as a way to cope with the ups and downs of adolescence that have been compounded by Covid-19 lockdowns and restrictions .

“Children experience scary things.

“Sitting down with a pen and putting it on a piece of paper can really help.”

There are no limits to the style or genre of the poem, with poets of all levels encouraged to submit their work and grow the region’s community of creative writers.

Poets Corner airs Sunday afternoons at 5 p.m. on Casey Radio, 97.7FM.

If you would like your work to be shared on the air, simply email poetscorner977fm@gmail.com with an audio recording of your work.

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India’s first radio broadcast on Prime Minister’s ‘Mann Ki Baat’, recalling World Radio Day trip https://colinmarshallradio.com/indias-first-radio-broadcast-on-prime-ministers-mann-ki-baat-recalling-world-radio-day-trip/ Sun, 13 Feb 2022 11:08:29 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/indias-first-radio-broadcast-on-prime-ministers-mann-ki-baat-recalling-world-radio-day-trip/ Radio is a powerful medium to celebrate humanity in its diversity and provides a platform for democratic discourse. It remains one of the most popular media platforms in the world. Radio can shape a society’s experience of diversity because of its unique ability to reach large audiences and serve as a platform for all voices […]]]>

Radio is a powerful medium to celebrate humanity in its diversity and provides a platform for democratic discourse. It remains one of the most popular media platforms in the world. Radio can shape a society’s experience of diversity because of its unique ability to reach large audiences and serve as a platform for all voices to be heard and represented. Radio stations serve diverse communities, offer a variety of programs, opinions and content, and reflect the diversity of their audiences through their organizations.

According to several international studies, radio remains one of the most trusted and widely used media in the world. Therefore, the theme for the 2022 edition of World Radio Day has been decided to be “Radio and Trust”.

In honor of World Radio Day 2022, UNESCO calls on radio stations around the world to commemorate the 11th edition of this event and over a century of radio. The World Radio Day sub-themes are Trust in Radio Journalism, Trust and Accessibility and Trust and Sustainability of Radio Stations.

Initial phase of radio in India

The Radio Club broadcast the first radio program in India in June 1923. Daily broadcasts included music and talk for two or three hours each day.

Nevertheless, the stations were forced to close in 1927 due to lack of financial support. The next step was to establish a broadcasting service, which began broadcasting in Bombay in July 1927 and in Calcutta a month later under an agreement between the Indian government and the Indian Broadcasting Company Ltd.

India’s first radio station was established in Delhi on June 8, 1936. The term “All India Radio” was coined by Sir Lionel Fielden on June 8, 1936. A former senior BBC producer, he worked as a broadcast controller in India for five years. and was one of the eminent persons to establish All India Radio (AIR).

India’s national public radio station, All India Radio (AIR), is officially known as Akashvani. It is the largest radio network in the country and the world and offers a variety of programs such as drama section, FM section, national service, etc.

All India Radio Signature Tune

A brand new melody was also introduced in the same year. AIR’s signature tune was based on Raag Shivaranjini and was composed by Walter Kaufman, a Czech Jew who fled Europe in fear of Nazi onslaught. In 1934 he came to India and lived in Bombay for twelve years, where he worked in the music department of AIR. While there, he conducted extensive research on Indian music and even worked on Hindi films.

AIR – the largest media organization

AIR has become one of the largest media organizations in the world, thanks to its phenomenal growth. With a network of 262 radio stations, AIR reaches nearly 92% of the national population and almost all of its territory. The popularity of the radio station only grew over time. PM Modi’s “Mann Ki Baat” is now available on AIR.

Also Read: From Top Industrialist to Banning Market by SEBI, What Led to Downfall of Anil Ambani?

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Barrett Sports Media’s Top 20 Sports Radio Program Directors in the Big Market in 2021 https://colinmarshallradio.com/barrett-sports-medias-top-20-sports-radio-program-directors-in-the-big-market-in-2021/ Fri, 11 Feb 2022 12:56:49 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/barrett-sports-medias-top-20-sports-radio-program-directors-in-the-big-market-in-2021/ We’ve reached the end of the first week of the 7th Annual BSM Top 20. We’ve featured the Top 20 National Shows, Major Morning, Midday, and Afternoon Market Shows, as well as the Mid Market Morning, Midday and afternoon shows. Thank you to everyone who took the time this week to share the Top 20 […]]]>

We’ve reached the end of the first week of the 7th Annual BSM Top 20. We’ve featured the Top 20 National Shows, Major Morning, Midday, and Afternoon Market Shows, as well as the Mid Market Morning, Midday and afternoon shows. Thank you to everyone who took the time this week to share the Top 20 lists and congratulate those recognized on social media. It’s very appreciated.

As you browse the selections, remember that the lists represent the collective opinions of 46 industry leaders. Yours truly does not vote. I would like to thank Stephanie Eads, Dylan Barrette and Demetri Ravanos for helping me through the Top 20 process, and Point-to-point marketing to be our exclusive sponsor of this year’s Top 20. Tim Bronsil and its staff are a valuable resource for many in the media industry, and if you are unfamiliar with their work, you should take the time to learn more. This can be done by clicking here.

When it comes to voting, here are a few things to understand.

#1 – These results are based on 2021 performance. 2022 changes have no impact on these results. This means that program directors such as Jeff Rickard, who recently left WEEI, were eligible since he scheduled the station until the end of 2021. On the other hand, PDs such as Danny Zederman and Sean Thompson , who recently got opportunities in Chicago and Phoenix were ineligible as they did not work in the position in 2021. Our only rule since this series began in 2016 is that an individual/show must complete the year with the station where he works in the same position for which he was hired.

#2 – Our leadership panel is made up of program directors and corporate executives from a number of leading broadcast companies including Audacy, iHeart, Cumulus, Beasley, Hubbard, Good Karma Brands, ESPN Radio, FOX Sports Radio , SiriusXM, Spotify and independently owned and operated radio stations. . We involve a large number of people in order to receive feedback from all parts of the country, as well as to prevent the results from strongly favoring one company.

#3 – A total of 27 programmers were eligible to vote in the major market sports radio program director category.

#4 – Our leadership panel selected the top 20 program directors using a few factors; station success, cross-platform excellence, industry respect, brand reputation and creative ideas. Keep in mind that our constituents live in different cities, have different tastes and experiences, and work for different companies, so some factors may be valued more or less by individual. It’s not a perfect science, but it’s the best system we can think of to present the best of sports radio.

Which brings us to this year’s ranking of sports radio directors in major markets. The top prize this year goes to 98.5 The Sports Hub’s, Rick Radzik. The Boston sports radio station, which won the Top 20 awards this year, has had a monster performance in each quarter, helping The Hub become the number one revenue earner among all sports stations. With Rick at the helm, business and listening exploded. Rick received a good fight from WFAN’s Spike Eskin, who finished 2nd. Radzik earned the most Top 5 votes of any PD, including seven (7) first place votes. Eskin had more 1st place votes, ten (10) but less top 5. BSM congratulates Rick and the entire 98.5 The Sports Hub team on taking home this year’s highest honor, along with all the PDs who earned a spot on this year’s list.

Now here are the full results of “Top 20 Sports Radio Program Directors in BSM’s Large Market in 2021!”

Additional notes:

  • Rick Radzik obtained seven (7) 1st place votes and a category of twenty-two (22) top 5 votes to retain the WFANs Spike Eskin of twelve (12) points. Eskin led the category with the most votes for first place, taking ten (10) of them.
  • 21-25 was occupied by Rich Moore of Sports Radio KJR in Seattle, Jeff Rickard from WEEI to Boston, Adam Klug from 97.3 The Fan in San Diego, Matt Edgar from 680 The Fan in Atlanta, and Kyle Brown of 710 ESPN in Seattle.
  • The closest battles saw Dave Tapper finish 3 points ahead of Brian Longand Ryan Hurley edge armen williams of 4 points.
  • Of the 27 programmers eligible this year, 7 received at least one vote for 1st place.

Here is the remaining schedule for the Top 20 BSM of 2021.

  • monday 14 february = Top 20 Major/Mid-Market Sports Radio Stations of 2021
  • tuesday 15 february = The 20 Best Original Sports Podcasts/Specialty Picks of 2021

To see previous years of BSM Top 20 results, click here.

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A 1971 radio show explores Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside https://colinmarshallradio.com/a-1971-radio-show-explores-vancouvers-downtown-eastside/ Tue, 08 Feb 2022 17:18:29 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/a-1971-radio-show-explores-vancouvers-downtown-eastside/ “So many times by so many people they have been exploited, oppressed, abused and truly fucked.” The start of 2022 marked the release of more Vancouver archival material into the public domain; among these is a radio program called Skid road special. The show is an in-depth look at the world and issues along what […]]]>

“So many times by so many people they have been exploited, oppressed, abused and truly fucked.”

The start of 2022 marked the release of more Vancouver archival material into the public domain; among these is a radio program called Skid road special.

The show is an in-depth look at the world and issues along what was Vancouver’s derailment route (also known as the “skid row”): Hastings Street in the Downtown Eastside. The neighborhood is well known as one of the poorest in Canada, with many residents facing a variety of health and social issues.

The Skid Road Special, despite being over 50 years old, sees many of the same issues, but from a different perspective.

“Skid Road is known for its dreary beer halls, ramshackle hotels and rooming houses,” the host explains in his introduction. “And it’s generally considered an area of ​​town inhabited by drunks, drug addicts, prostitutes and transients.”

Although this is the stereotypical description of the community, the show aims to educate listeners on the issues facing those who live in the neighborhood and dispel myths. The host immediately notes, for example, that the idea that it is filled with passengers is misguided as there were 7,000 permanent residents according to a 1971 census.

At the time, the area was estimated to be 85% single male, many of whom were former loggers who were unable to work due to age or other reasons. They are described as being “trapped” due to a series of problems.

Religious groups, the backbone of aid in the 1970s

Many of the issues discussed, through interviews with frontline workers and a man who had lived in the area for years, are familiar, though some seem simplified. At the same time, some of the problem-solving mechanisms have evolved significantly over the ensuing years.

While today faith-based organizations are heavily involved in efforts, the religious nature was often quite strong in the late 1960s and early 1970s, says George Marks, who was asked about life the low.

“You see, they have these rescue missions, you know, where a person will sit for at least half an hour or an hour and listen to religious programs,” Marks explains. “And then he gets really, really bad food, or in one case, he gets really, really shocking food.”

Locals feel compelled to do so, he says, because rent often accounted for more than half of welfare checks. As these funds dried up, the missions in the area were the only place to go.

“If they go to the Salvation Army for socks, or something, they almost have to pledge to take Christ to their hearts to get a pair of socks,” he says.

Money, of course, is a major factor, as is rent eating up a good chunk of welfare checks. Marks explains that he received $93.50 a month in welfare and $40 for rent.

DTES residents recall being treated ‘like a fool’

“People on welfare now are worse off than I was then, you know, because they, you know, the government gave them and gave them 40 or 50 dollars more a month to live,” he said. “But in the meantime, the cost of living has gone up so much that they should have been given an extra $100 a month to live on.”

This traps people there, he continues, and makes them dependent on the services concentrated there. At the same time, people often became friends, creating another reason not to leave.

Issues related to the social protection system are also addressed; at the time, an administration system was set up for people who were thought to be wasting their money. It was intended to prevent people from spending all their money on alcohol, but essentially meant that a “responsible person, usually a member of the clergy or a social worker” would control someone’s money. People remember being treated “like fools”.

The faulty system meant people who had been robbed multiple times could find themselves trapped, and one frontline worker tells the story of a woman who was ‘administered’ for nine months after giving birth because she was ill at the time of the birth. she agreed, not knowing what it really meant.

“She was given so much of her check, as much as the administrator felt she needed, not what the woman felt she needed,” the worker said. “If she wanted to go to a show or go somewhere with her baby and she wished she had extra money, that was too bad.”

Another difference in Vancouver at the time is that the Downtown Eastside was no different from other neighborhoods. One of the frontline workers notes that there were similar issues at Fraserview and Grandview. In fact, one of Vancouver’s most popular neighborhoods found itself in a similar situation.

“We have problems in Kitsilano and some of the problems in Kitsilano are obvious because they are exposed, just like the problems in the Downtown Eastside,” she says, noting that it is a good time for people to be aware. involve in helping because the “problems are all so obvious”.

Residents are ‘exploited, oppressed, abused and really fucked up’

However, Marks notes that the situation is that the Downtown Eastside is full of people who have cut themselves off from everyone else.

“So many times by so many people, they’ve been exploited, oppressed, abused and really fucked up,” he says. “Everyone in this community is left out from everyone else because they don’t trust anyone anymore,” he says.

Notably, the show only briefly touches on certain issues, or does not discuss them at all. Drugs are not mentioned once, and addiction is only implied with respect to alcohol. And while one can see where mental health issues may be part of what’s going on, it’s never discussed (Marks was “dumped on Skid Road” after leaving Riverview Hospital).

The show is a half-hour show created in 1971, according to the City of Vancouver Archives; while the creator is listed as Vancouver Co-operative Radio, this organization did not exist until 1974. It was probably a precursor to the co-operative which produced it.

Listen to the entire show via the video player at the top.

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Duluthian’s holistic publication turns 2, adds radio program – Duluth News Tribune https://colinmarshallradio.com/duluthians-holistic-publication-turns-2-adds-radio-program-duluth-news-tribune/ Sat, 05 Feb 2022 00:14:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/duluthians-holistic-publication-turns-2-adds-radio-program-duluth-news-tribune/ DULUTH – When Aaron Tank sought a holistic release, the Twin Ports failed. So, Northland style, he threw his own. The Vessel is a free quarterly publication that graces the stands of coffee shops, grocery stores and healing centers across northern Minnesota and Wisconsin. “My first impulse was to explore and document people’s mystical experiences,” […]]]>

DULUTH – When Aaron Tank sought a holistic release, the Twin Ports failed. So, Northland style, he threw his own.

The Vessel is a free quarterly publication that graces the stands of coffee shops, grocery stores and healing centers across northern Minnesota and Wisconsin.

“My first impulse was to explore and document people’s mystical experiences,” he said, but in his two years on newsstands The Vessel’s content spans soul contracts, meditation , past life regression and plays written by pastors, painters and authors.

“I was pleasantly surprised by the amount of metaphysical spiritual content people provided. It seems like a surprisingly relevant theme in people’s minds,” he said.

The Summer 2020 issue of The Vessel features a colorful mandala pattern by Lance Heddan.

Contributed / Aaron Tank

Tank was inspired by Twin Cities-based The Edge magazine when he started The Vessel, a one-man, home-based business, where he edits and produces the print product and pre-records his radio program, which airs on Two Harbors Community. Radio.

The Vessel strays from his work on chemical addiction and music, but merges his early interest in journalism with the spiritual and metaphysical.

Tank said he doesn’t identify with just one religious system, he draws inspiration from many and is constantly evolving. “There is spiritual value in every experience,” he said.

Tank took the time to talk about managing The Vessel during a pandemic, what he’s reading right now, and his dream dinner date with Rumi.

Q: The ship includes submissions from a wide range of people. Tell me about the community approach to content and why you chose it.

A: There are many in the Twin Ports community and beyond who have wonderful talents, incredible experiences and insights on various topics, both spiritual and otherwise. I wanted to create a platform for people to share them.

The Fall 2020 Vessel Cover features a bright jacket from Amethyst Harle.

The Fall 2020 Vessel Cover features sustainable clothing from Amethyst Harle.

Contributed / Aaron Tank

The ship gave people a place to present their stories, ideas and practices where they may not have had a place to do so before.

Many who have appeared in The Vessel have published books or been in other publications, but I love that The Vessel was sort of a first opportunity for many to be in a publication. Also, various people have discovered each other through the journal, and it’s great that The Vessel has helped bring people together on some level.

There is a lot of division in our society, so I hope the newspaper and radio show will help create more understanding and acceptance among different groups and factions.

Q: Has your participation in this publication and radio show introduced you to any new concepts or ways of thinking? If that’s true, what are they?

A: I have come to realize more fully that people can have mystical or spiritual experiences regardless of their background. Religious, spiritual, atheists and agnostics are all capable of experiencing somewhat inexplicable and mystical things.

Ironically, I’ve discovered that so-called paranormal events are actually quite normal.

Q: Tell us about the name of your publication.

A: I had considered several names, but The Vessel kept coming back to me as a general term that could encompass several notions.

The Spring 2020 Vessel cover features a painting with dark purple trees against a yellow and green sky.

The Spring 2020 Vessel cover features “The Great Mystery”, a painting by Sarah Ina’amii.

Contributed / Aaron Tank

For example, a ship can be a means of transportation: the implication being that the content will transport the reader to new territory. A vessel can also be a container, especially a sacred container for sacred material.

Also, we have big ships (ships) regularly coming into the twin ports, which seemed like a good overall name for the post that would tie several different ideas together.

Q: You have included cultural and social diversity and sustainability issues in The Vessel’s mission. Do you see them as spiritual areas of interest? If so, how?

A: Personally, I don’t really distinguish between the divine and the mundane; I believe that the divine is essentially infused into everything.

If everything has a divine spark, then every person and everything in the universe involves a spiritual element. I believe it is a sacred duty to pay attention to environmental issues and create a more sustainable world.

I also believe that learning about different cultures and celebrating diversity, as well as holistic health and artistic and creative processes, is very important and enhances spiritual life.

Aaron Tank, the producer and editor of The Vessel, stops at the Lincoln Park Bridge

Aaron Tank, the producer and editor of The Vessel, stops at the Lincoln Park Bridge in Duluth on January 31.

Jed Carlson / Upper Telegram

Q: You work and play music in addition to managing this post. Has this project been a blessing or an added burden during the pandemic? Or both?

A: The start-up phase was difficult: I just defined my approach, my designs, my distribution and my layout. I produced the very first issue during the initial shutdown in 2020 and it was a bit stressful.

Overall, however, it has given me meaningful activity at a time when isolation and global stressors have increased. It’s been kind of a therapeutic outlet and a way for me to connect with people on a deeper level.

From the feedback I’ve received, it seems the document has been enjoyed by many who find it to be a little inspiration or a healthy, enlightening escape during difficult times, and it does me good.

Q: Any spiritual lessons to be learned from leading this project?

A: Everyone has a valuable perspective and experiences worth sharing, regardless of their fate in life. I’ve received a lot of great content from people who have professional or established credentials and I’m very grateful for that, however, some of the best content comes from people who don’t have those credentials. , or don’t have a big resume – but still have a unique and compelling perspective, an impactful practice, or perhaps experience that’s nonetheless very deep.

Aaron Tank, the producer and editor of The Vessel, stops for a quick photo as he strolls through Lincoln Park

Aaron Tank, the producer and editor of The Vessel, stops for a quick photo as he strolls through Lincoln Park.

Jed Carlson / Upper Telegram

Q: What are you reading/listening to/watching right now?

A: Fossil Men, written by Kermit Patterson, is a book that recounts past efforts to find the first human fossils and in turn rewrite human evolutionary history. (There were also several women involved in this effort).

And, “Primitive Mythology,” by Joseph Campbell, explores the formation of early human mythology and attempts to uncover the origins of archetypal ideas in early human thought.

Q: If you could have dinner with three people, living or dead, who would they be?

A: Rumi, 13th century Persian mystical poet; Muhammad Ali, late boxing prodigy and activist; and prominent songwriter and activist Neil Young.

Between these three, I’m sure the conversation could get quite interesting and I could find myself sitting and listening in amazement!

Q: Do you have anything else to add?

A: When I started producing The Vessel publication and radio show, I had doubts about whether it would resonate with people and wondered about my ability to successfully produce something. of value in these fields, of which I had little experience. Despite some initial apprehensions, it turned out to be a very rewarding and meaningful activity.

It feels good to produce something that people enjoy and enjoy participating in. I feel like everyone involved benefited from it.

I encourage anyone who has an idea or project in mind to take this leap of faith and pursue it, even if it may seem strange or “offbeat”. If it comes from the heart and involves good intentions, it will likely improve your life and the lives of those around you.

I would also like to encourage people to share their views and experiences, even if they may seem different or strange. You might be pleasantly surprised to find that many people also have unique perspectives and strange experiences.

You might find kindred spirits in unexpected places!

“People of Faith” focuses on Northlanders and their walk with spirituality and community. If you have a suggestion for this series, contact Melinda Lavine at mlavine@duluthnews.com or 218-723-5346.

For more information:

  • Visit The Ship on Facebook.
  • Radio: The Vessel airs on 99.5 FM, Two Harbors Community Radio, 7-8 p.m. on the second Wednesday of the month; it plays again from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. the following Friday. The show is streamed on ktwh.org.
  • E-mail: twinportsvessel@gmail.com
Aaron Tank, the producer and editor of The Vessel, stops at the Lincoln Park Bridge

Aaron Tank, the producer and editor of The Vessel, stops at the Lincoln Park Bridge in Duluth on January 31.

Jed Carlson / Upper Telegram

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