radio stations – Colin Marshall Radio http://colinmarshallradio.com/ Fri, 25 Mar 2022 14:19:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://colinmarshallradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-1-1-120x120.png radio stations – Colin Marshall Radio http://colinmarshallradio.com/ 32 32 Missouri radio station still airs Kremlin programming, even as Russia invades Ukraine https://colinmarshallradio.com/missouri-radio-station-still-airs-kremlin-programming-even-as-russia-invades-ukraine/ Wed, 16 Mar 2022 10:18:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/missouri-radio-station-still-airs-kremlin-programming-even-as-russia-invades-ukraine/ Tune in to 11:40 a.m. or 102.9 FM in Kansas City and you might hear Jarmarl Thomas pontificate about the motives behind the Russian invasion of Ukraine on his show Fault Lines. The week of March 7, Thomas spent much of the three-hour show painting Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy as the instigator of the Russian […]]]>

Tune in to 11:40 a.m. or 102.9 FM in Kansas City and you might hear Jarmarl Thomas pontificate about the motives behind the Russian invasion of Ukraine on his show Fault Lines.

The week of March 7, Thomas spent much of the three-hour show painting Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy as the instigator of the Russian invasion, blaming the Ukrainians and the United States.

“Zelenskyy is not the overflowing, brilliant hero that the West made him out to be,” Thomas said. “It’s the narrative that’s needed to solidify that idea, it’s unprovoked.”

Fault Lines is a show featured on Radio Sputnik, broadcast programming produced in Washington DC and funded by the Kremlin. The show airs regularly on KCXL, a small station in Liberty, Missouri, which can be heard for miles in all directions.

Radio Sputnik’s account of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine stands in stark contrast to most reporting on the ongoing conflict, portrayed largely as an unprovoked attack on Ukrainians led by Russian President Vladimir Putin.

KCXL and Washington DC station WZHF-AM Air Radio Sputnik daily. A handful of other stations also pick up these broadcasts.

    Pete Schartel says he fulfilled a childhood dream when he bought his first <a class=radio station in 1994.” srcset=”https://npr.brightspotcdn.com/dims4/default/1dd37ae/2147483647/strip/true/crop/1760×1174+0+0/resize/1760×1174!/quality/90/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fnpr.brightspotcdn.com%2F24%2Fe5%2Fb847ab804754a94ddce5eea1bf69%2Fschartel-sputnik-haxel.jpg 2x” width=”880″ height=”587″ src=”https://npr.brightspotcdn.com/dims4/default/e5757e3/2147483647/strip/true/crop/1760×1174+0+0/resize/880×587!/quality/90/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fnpr.brightspotcdn.com%2F24%2Fe5%2Fb847ab804754a94ddce5eea1bf69%2Fschartel-sputnik-haxel.jpg” loading=”lazy” bad-src=”data:image/svg+xml;base64,PHN2ZyB4bWxucz0iaHR0cDovL3d3dy53My5vcmcvMjAwMC9zdmciIHZlcnNpb249IjEuMSIgaGVpZ2h0PSI1ODdweCIgd2lkdGg9Ijg4MHB4Ij48L3N2Zz4=”/>

Pete Schartel says he fulfilled a childhood dream when he bought his first radio station in 1994.

As the Russian invasion of Ukraine rages on, scrutiny from Kremlin-sponsored media like Radio Sputnik continues to intensify. And for KCXL owner Pete Schartel, that scrutiny comes in the form of renewed pressure to stop airing programs that keep the radio station going.

Since the beginning of the Russian invasion, companies around the world have regularly ceased their relations with Russia. Roku and DirecTV last week, Russian state-controlled RT, formerly known as Russia Today, was dropped. This prompted RT to close its US branch and lay off most US staff.

In Russia, outlets like CNN and the New York Times withdraw journalists from the country following a censorship law signed by Putin that threatens up to 15 years in prison for spreading “false information”.

“Extremely Unusual”

Earlier this month, in response to the invasion, National Association of Broadcasters (NAB) chief executive Curtis LeGeyt called on all U.S. broadcasters to cease all state-sponsored programming with ties to the Russian government.

NAB’s chief legal officer, Rick Kaplan, said the move was “extremely unusual” but necessary.

He said the broadcasts produced by Radio Sputnik amounted to nothing more than propaganda that disseminated misinformation from a foreign government about the invasion of the United States.

“It’s different from the discourse, which is very important to have — open, all points of view on the table. There’s a line between that and direct propaganda.”

Rick Kaplan, National Association of Broadcasters

“[There’s] there’s a lot of misinformation going on, generally speaking, in our country and around the world – I think that’s an important statement.

Schartel called NAB’s request a “gut reaction” that trampled on KCXL’s freedom of speech and led to a maelstrom of angry calls to the station, calling Schartel and his wife Jonne “traitors.”

“If I did (cut the program), we would be doing exactly the main thing that we criticize the former Soviet Union and other communist regimes for doing where they don’t allow free speech,” Schartel said. .

And it’s not just free speech that worries Schartel. He said that without the monthly revenue from the deal with Radio Sputnik, the station would probably not be able to stay open.

In exchange for airing Radio Sputnik’s programs, Schartel earns $5,000 a month to air six hours of Radio Sputnik in two blocks, 6 a.m. to 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. daily at 11:40 a.m. 102.9 FM and 104.7 FM.

“Something We Could Live With”

Ahead of the 2020 deal with the Russian government, Schartel said he was struggling to keep his small radio station on the air on a shoestring budget.

“It felt like something we could live with,” Schartel said. “Especially if they could pay us and keep the rest of the station on the air.”

U.S. Justice Department Foreign Agents Registration Act (FARA) filings show RM Broadcasting paid Schartel’s company more than $160,000 to carry Radio Sputnik programming over the past two years .

Arnold Ferolito of Florida-based RM Broadcasting brokered the deal between Rossiya Segodnya, a Kremlin-run media agency in Russia, and KCXL in 2020.

In 2017, Ferlito brokered a similar deal with WZHF-AM and unsuccessfully purchased programming from stations in larger markets like New York and Los Angeles.

Two years later, as investigations continued into foreign influence in the 2016 election, the Justice Department ordered Ferolito to register as a foreign agent with FARA.

Congress first passed FARA in 1938 to combat Nazi propaganda in the run-up to World War II.

At the time, Ferolito told KCUR 89.3 that he was a businessman “caught in the middle of a political problem.” He fought the Justice Department’s order in court without success.

After U.S. District Court Judge Robin L. Rosenberg upheld the ruling, the Justice Department said in a statement that the information Ferolito and RM Broadcasting transmitted to the U.S. airwaves lacked transparency.

“The American people have a right to know if a foreign flag is flying behind speech broadcast in the United States,” the statement said. “Our concern is not the content of the speech but the transparency of the true identity of the speaker.

Yet Ferolito continues to profit from the agreements between Rossiya Segodnya and the radio stations, as long as the stations continue to broadcast Radio Sputnik. According to documents filed by FARA, Ferolito earned a small percentage of the more than $1.6 million the Russian government paid to KCXL and WZFH.

Ferolito did not give an interview to the Midwest Newsroom, but in a statement, RM Broadcasting “stands with Ukraine and the victims of oppression and aggression around the world” and argued that shutting down Radio Sputnik’s programming in the United States would be a blow to freedom of expression.

“Alternative Radio”

Radio Sputnik isn’t the only controversial programming on KCXL, due to what Schartel has said is his love of “alternative radio.”

KCXL also airs TruNews, a show The Anti-Defamation League says regularly features anti-Semitic, Islamophobic and anti-LGBTQ messages and in 2018 Schartel gave airtime to Steve West, a Clay County Republican candidate for the Missouri House of Representatives who was denounced by his party and family for espousing bigotry.

The station has supporters like Kevin Phillips, a KCXL listener for 20 years.

The self-proclaimed conspiracy researcher said he was listening because Schartel airs programs that other stations avoid.

“Whenever people tried to get their news out there and couldn’t be heard anywhere else, he (Pete) would give them space on the air,” Phillips said. “Pete never limited the topics.”

Phillips said he gets a good deal of his news from sources such as Radio Sputnik and RT. He said he didn’t mind the Russian programming funding.

“If you’ve been following Ukraine’s history for 20 years like me, you’ll find a lot more truth on Russian pay radio than on American radio,” Phillips said.

Schartel plans to continue broadcasting Radio Sputnik shows for as long as they are available, but his contract with RM Broadcasting and Rossiya Segodnya ends in December 2022. He does not expect it to be renewed.

This story comes from the Midwest Newsroom, an investigative reporting collaboration including IPR, KCUR 89.3, Nebraska Public Media News, St. Louis Public Radio and NPR.

Copyright 2022 KCUR 89.3

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Mobile Radio Station Market Growth Drivers with Relevance Mapping by Key Players like Motorola, JVCKENWOOD, Icom, Hytera, Sepura, Cobra, etc. https://colinmarshallradio.com/mobile-radio-station-market-growth-drivers-with-relevance-mapping-by-key-players-like-motorola-jvckenwood-icom-hytera-sepura-cobra-etc/ Sat, 12 Mar 2022 10:42:48 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/mobile-radio-station-market-growth-drivers-with-relevance-mapping-by-key-players-like-motorola-jvckenwood-icom-hytera-sepura-cobra-etc/ The Mobile Radio Station Market report provides detailed analysis of global market size, regional and country level market size, segmentation market growth, market share, competitive landscape , sales analysis, impact of domestic and global market players such as Motorola, JVCKENWOOD, Icom, Hytera, Sepura, Cobra, etc., value chain optimization, business regulations, recent developments, opportunity analysis, strategic […]]]>

The Mobile Radio Station Market report provides detailed analysis of global market size, regional and country level market size, segmentation market growth, market share, competitive landscape , sales analysis, impact of domestic and global market players such as Motorola, JVCKENWOOD, Icom, Hytera, Sepura, Cobra, etc., value chain optimization, business regulations, recent developments, opportunity analysis, strategic market growth analysis, product launches, regional market expansion and technological innovations.

Key areas that were targeted in the report:

  • Key trends observed in the global mobile radio station market
  • Market and pricing issues
  • The extent of commerciality in the market
  • Geographical limits
  • Distribution, planning, performance and supplier requirements
  • Growth opportunities that may emerge in the industry in the coming years
  • Growth strategies envisaged by the actors.

Get an Exclusive Sample of Mobile Radio Stations Market Report @ https://www.affluencemarketreports.com/industry-analysis/request-sample/2193770/

Mobile Radio Station Market Segmentation:

Mobile Radio Station market is split by Type and by Application. For the period 2016-2028, the growth between segments provides accurate calculations and forecasts for sales by type and by application in terms of volume and value. This analysis can help you grow your business by targeting qualified niche markets.

Mobile Radio Station Market Report Based on Product Type:

  • Analog military mobile radio station
  • Digital military mobile radio station

Application-Based Mobile Radio Station Market Report:

  • Government and public safety
  • Utilities
  • Industry and Commerce
  • Others

Key Market Players for the Global Mobile Radio Stations Market are listed below:

  • Motorola
  • JVCKENWOOD
  • I’m coming
  • Hytera
  • Sepura
  • Tai
  • Cobra
  • yaesu
  • Entel Group
  • Uniden
  • Midland
  • BFDX
  • Kirisun
  • Quansheng
  • HQT
  • Neolink

Get Extra Discount on Mobile Radio Stations Market Report, If your company is listed in the list of key players above @ https://www.affluencemarketreports.com/industry-analysis/request-discount/2193770/

Promising Regions & Countries Mentioned In The Mobile Radio Stations Market Report:

  • North America [United States, Canada, Mexico]
  • South America [Brazil, Argentina, Columbia, Chile, Peru]
  • Europe [Germany, UK, France, Italy, Russia, Spain, Netherlands, Turkey, Switzerland]
  • Middle East and Africa [GCC, North Africa, South Africa]
  • Asia Pacific [China, Southeast Asia, India, Japan, Korea, Western Asia]

TABLE OF CONTENTS UNDERSTAND

Consumption Forecast, Market Opportunities and Challenges, Risk and Influence Factor Analysis, Market Size by Application, Market Size by Manufacturers, Market Size by Type, Mobile Radio Station Consumption by Regions, Station Production Mobile Radio Stations by Regions, Production Forecast, Value Chain, and Sales Channel Analysis, Key Findings of Global Mobile Radio Stations Research, Manufacturers Profiles

Report customization: Customers can request customization of the report according to their need for additional data.

CONTACT FOR ADDITIONAL CUSTOMIZATION @ https://www.affluencemarketreports.com/industry-analysis/request-inquiry/2193770/

  1. Overview of the mobile radio station market
  2. Company Profiles: Motorola, JVCKENWOOD, Icom, Hytera, Sepura, Tait, Cobra, Yaesu, Entel Group, Uniden, Midland, BFDX, Kirisun, Quansheng, HQT, Neolink
  3. Mobile Radio Station Sales by Key Players
  4. Mobile Radio Station Market Analysis by Region
  5. Mobile Radio Stations Market Segment By Type: Analog Military Mobile Radio Station, Digital Military Mobile Radio Station
  6. Mobile Radio Station Market Segment By Application: Government and Public Safety, Utilities, Industry and Commerce, Others
  7. North America by Country, by Type and by Application
  8. Europe by Country, by Type and by Application
  9. Asia-Pacific by Country, by Type and by Application
  10. South America by Country, by Type and by Application
  11. Middle East and Africa by Country, by Type and by Application
  12. Sales channel, distributors, traders and resellers
  13. Research results and conclusion
  14. appendix

Impact of COVID-19 on the Mobile Radio Station Market

The report also contains the effect of the ongoing global pandemic i.e. COVID-19 on the Mobile Radio Station market and what the future holds for it. It offers an analysis of the impacts of the epidemic on the international market. The epidemic immediately interrupted the series of need and supply. The Mobile Radio Stations Market report also assesses the economic effect on business and money markets. Futuristic Reports has accrued guidance from multiple delegates from this company and engaged from secondary and primary research to extending clients with strategies and data to combat industry struggles throughout and after the COVID-19 pandemic.

For more details on the impact of COVID-19 on the Mobile Radio Stations Market https://www.affluencemarketreports.com/industry-analysis/covid19-request/2193770/

Frequently Asked Questions

  • What is the scope of the Mobile Radio Station market report?
  • Does this report estimate the current Mobile Radio Station market size?
  • Does the report provide the Mobile Radio Station market size in terms of – value (million US$) and volume (thousands of units) – of the market?
  • What segments are covered in this report?
  • What are the key factors covered in this Mobile Radio Stations market report?
  • Does this report offer customization?

About Affluence:

Affluence Market Reports is the next generation of all your research needs with a strong grip on the global market for industries, organizations and governments. Our goal is to provide exemplary reports that meet the exact needs of the clients, which offer the right business technique, planning and competitive landscape for new and existing industries that will develop your business needs.

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Website: www.affluencemarketreports.com

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In the middle of the war, an independent Russian radio is silent | Russo-Ukrainian War https://colinmarshallradio.com/in-the-middle-of-the-war-an-independent-russian-radio-is-silent-russo-ukrainian-war/ Wed, 02 Mar 2022 13:28:47 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/in-the-middle-of-the-war-an-independent-russian-radio-is-silent-russo-ukrainian-war/ Names marked with an asterisk* have been changed to protect identities. On Tuesday evening, one of Russia’s best-known radio stations went silent. Listeners tuned to Echo of Moscow, one of the few independent news outlets, free from government control, remaining in the country, suddenly heard nothing but the hiss of static. Since Russian President Vladimir […]]]>

Names marked with an asterisk* have been changed to protect identities.

On Tuesday evening, one of Russia’s best-known radio stations went silent.

Listeners tuned to Echo of Moscow, one of the few independent news outlets, free from government control, remaining in the country, suddenly heard nothing but the hiss of static.

Since Russian President Vladimir Putin ordered the invasion of Ukraine on February 24, authorities have launched a crackdown on independent media and protesters who have come out in their thousands to denounce the war, which the Kremlin will call ” special operation. ”.

A statement from Russia’s internet censorship committee, Roskomnadzor, warned that labeling the military campaign as an “invasion”, “attack” or “declaration of war” would lead to the offending website being blocked.

Authorities accused independent media, such as Echo of Moscow, TV Rain (Dozhd) and Novaya Gazeta of spreading misinformation about the conflict, threatening to fine them up to five million rubles ($60,000 ).

Dmitry Muratov, Nobel Prize-winning editor of Novaya Gazeta, said he would not accept official information about Ukraine and would rely on his own correspondents and newsroom to verify facts .

Over the weekend, Rain’s editor-in-chief Tikhon Dzyadko and his wife, TV presenter Yekaterina Kotrikadze, were bombarded with prank calls and threats against their family members after their stories were published online. personal telephone numbers.

Then, on Monday evening, the attorney general’s office demanded that Roskomnadzor restrict access to Rain and Echo of Moscow, accusing them of “calls for extremist activity, violence”, as well as “deliberately false information regarding the actions of Russian military personnel in the framework of a special operation to protect the DPR and the LPR [Donetsk and Luhansk People’s Republics].”

While Echo of Moscow has been taken off the air completely, Rain’s live YouTube stream remains online.

Editors of the Echo of Moscow website said they would challenge the decision in court on grounds of political censorship, which is prohibited by the Russian constitution.

In a televised address to his viewers, Dzyadko insisted his station abides by the law and would continue broadcasting for as long as possible, while challenging the decision in court.

Both stations’ websites are still accessible through a VPN.

“Putin lost the war with Ukraine, Putin lost the war with the whole world,” Lev Schlossberg of Russia’s opposition Yabloko party said in a statement shared with Al Jazeera.

“Putin has lost everything. The victims and the destruction will never be forgiven. The truth is unbearable to him. He is furious and very dangerous. Therefore, the last independent media are being destroyed.

“Putin’s Russia is entering the terminal phase, when everything that lives in our country, everything that resists Putin, will be destroyed.

“As long as you can write about it, you can talk about it, you can show it, it can and should be done… Freedom of speech continues to resonate, albeit with a noose around its neck. We will be judged on what we did at the time of the disaster.

Meanwhile, Russian authorities have taken a tough stance against what they see as misinformation about the conflict in Ukraine.

On Monday, lawmakers proposed a new bill sentencing those who share what they call “false” and misinformation with up to 15 years in prison.

This includes data on supposed victims.

Official figures of those killed or captured have yet to be released, although local politicians have admitted their constituents have suffered casualties.

Ukraine said more than 350 people died in less than a week of war, including children, but Al Jazeera was unable to independently verify the toll.

Commenting on the crackdown, the head of Russia’s Human Rights Council, Valery Fadeyev, said that while he didn’t look at Rain, “as for Echo of Moscow, it’s true that there were different points of view expressed on the website, but with a predominance of opponents of the special operation in Ukraine.

“These included pacifist appeals from the Russian professional intelligentsia.”

Although he is the chairman of the Russian human rights body, Fadeyev is a member of Putin’s United Russia party and has not been sympathetic to the mistreatment of protesters in the past.

Social media sites

The information war has also spread to social networks.

Roskomnadzor announced on Friday that it was restricting access to Facebook after the company blocked accounts linked to Russian media.

Twitter was blocked soon after, with Roskomnadzor saying it was taking steps to limit the “spread of unreliable information of public importance about a special military operation in Ukraine”.

Meanwhile, Western nations have clamped down on the Kremlin-aligned television channel, Russia Today, or RT, taking it off the air. YouTube also blocked RT’s livestream.

Back in Russia, this means that there is effectively a blackout of the most popular online platforms, although it is still possible to access them using a VPN.

It should be noted that anti-war protests, which have been ongoing since Thursday, have also been staged on social media.

Since the invasion began on Thursday morning, nearly 7,000 people have been arrested in anti-war actions and protests, according to OVD-Info, an independent human rights media project that monitors political persecution.

These include Daniel* who was detained with his friend Natasha* in a major Russian city, which Al Jazeera will not name.

“I was in the cells for 16 hours,” he told Al Jazeera by phone.

“It is now a common experience for many, and there will be more and more such experiences. There were seven of us who were arrested for breaking COVID restrictions, so to speak, and put together in a cell with two concrete ledges that passed for beds.We were given a mattress, a blanket and a pillow with a pillowcase covered in yellow stains.

“Together with us was placed, shall we say, a gentleman of ill fortune, who cried ‘trash can’ [derogatory slang for police in Russia] for taking off his shoelaces. He was drunk and threw his unlaced boots out the door, fell asleep and snored loudly, then woke up and said if he was [Russian President Vladimir] Putin, he would have bombed everything in hell.

Daniel was in court the next day, where he saw Natasha, who had been released overnight. The moment he returned home, he learned that Kharkiv in eastern Ukraine was being bombarded by Russian missiles and several people had been killed.

“I will keep coming out,” Daniel said, words that would likely please imprisoned opposition leader Alexey Navalny.

On Wednesday, his team called on soldiers to disobey orders and the public to continue to attend peace rallies, post on social media and participate in civil disobedience, promising to pay fines to anyone who ends up be detained.

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The public radio show and podcast “Selected Shorts” gets the first permanent host in a decade. | story https://colinmarshallradio.com/the-public-radio-show-and-podcast-selected-shorts-gets-the-first-permanent-host-in-a-decade-story/ Thu, 24 Feb 2022 19:15:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/the-public-radio-show-and-podcast-selected-shorts-gets-the-first-permanent-host-in-a-decade-story/ Selected Shorts has a new host. The public radio and podcast series, created by Symphony Space, tapped author Meg Wolitzer to become the show’s first permanent host since the death of Symphony Space founder Isaiah Sheffer in 2012. After a decade of writers and artists serving as host of events on the show, those duties […]]]>

Selected Shorts has a new host. The public radio and podcast series, created by Symphony Space, tapped author Meg Wolitzer to become the show’s first permanent host since the death of Symphony Space founder Isaiah Sheffer in 2012. After a decade of writers and artists serving as host of events on the show, those duties will fall to Wolitzer, whose own stories have been interpreted on the show. She has written bestsellers such as “The Wife”, “The Interestings” and “The Female Persuasion”.

“We are thrilled to welcome Meg as the new host of Shorts selectedsaid Kathy Landau, executive director of Symphony Space in the announcement. “She brings deep connections to the show and the world she celebrates, explores and unpacks. Meg’s intelligence, passion and warmth will infuse our radio show and podcast with a new spirit and serve as an invitation open to our listeners to join us and to the conversation sparked by the powerful combination of short stories and extraordinary actors.

Selected Shorts offers a range of content from literature, film, theater and comedy. Episodes hosted by Wolitzer will debut in March. New podcast episodes are released every Thursday.

Wolitzer says she has long been an avid Selected Shorts listener and has had her own stories performed for the series by actors Blythe Danner and Jill Eikenberry.

“I think stories are like a stock cube of life, it’s a little concentrate of what’s going on in the world. And by listening to stories and reading them, you understand the world better. I don’t know what I would do without this kind of work,” Wolitzer said. “[Selected Shorts] unlike anything else I’ve heard before. The idea of ​​talking to actors and writers and listening to these stories and being a part of them is exciting to me. The actors bring something to it that you can’t necessarily hear when you say it in your head, and this marriage of actors and writers was made in heaven for me.

Selected Shorts was born in Symphony Space in 1985 and launched the performance literature genre, soon spawning the weekly radio show, heard on public radio stations nationwide and on the podcast.

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The public radio show and podcast “Selected Shorts” gets the first permanent host in a decade. | Daily News Podcast https://colinmarshallradio.com/the-public-radio-show-and-podcast-selected-shorts-gets-the-first-permanent-host-in-a-decade-daily-news-podcast/ Tue, 22 Feb 2022 16:40:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/the-public-radio-show-and-podcast-selected-shorts-gets-the-first-permanent-host-in-a-decade-daily-news-podcast/ Selected Shorts has a new host. The public radio and podcast series, created by Symphony Space, tapped author Meg Wolitzer to become the show’s first permanent host since the death of Symphony Space founder Isaiah Sheffer in 2012. After a decade of writers and artists serving as host of events on the show, those duties […]]]>

Selected Shorts has a new host. The public radio and podcast series, created by Symphony Space, tapped author Meg Wolitzer to become the show’s first permanent host since the death of Symphony Space founder Isaiah Sheffer in 2012. After a decade of writers and artists serving as host of events on the show, those duties will fall to Wolitzer, whose own stories have been interpreted on the show. She has written bestsellers such as “The Wife”, “The Interestings” and “The Female Persuasion”.

“We are thrilled to welcome Meg as the new host of Shorts selectedsaid Kathy Landau, executive director of Symphony Space in the announcement. “She brings deep connections to the show and the world she celebrates, explores and unpacks. Meg’s intelligence, passion and warmth will infuse our radio show and podcast with a new spirit and serve as an invitation open to our listeners to join us and to the conversation sparked by the powerful combination of short stories and extraordinary actors.

Selected Shorts offers a range of content from literature, film, theater and comedy. Episodes hosted by Wolitzer will debut in March. New podcast episodes are released every Thursday.

Wolitzer says she has long been an avid Selected Shorts listener and has had her own stories performed for the series by actors Blythe Danner and Jill Eikenberry.

“I think stories are like a stock cube of life, it’s a little concentrate of what’s going on in the world. And by listening to stories and reading them, you understand the world better. I don’t know what I would do without this kind of work,” Wolitzer said. “[Selected Shorts] unlike anything else I’ve heard before. The idea of ​​talking to actors and writers and listening to these stories and being a part of them is exciting to me. The actors bring something to it that you can’t necessarily hear when you say it in your head, and this marriage of actors and writers was made in heaven for me.

In addition to a new host, a book called “Small Odysseys: Selected Shorts Presents 35 New Stories” will also be released next month. The news was commissioned by Symphony Space and will be featured in a free live event scheduled for March 26 in New York City.

Selected Shorts was born in Symphony Space in 1985 and launched the performance literature genre, soon spawning the weekly radio show, heard on public radio stations nationwide and on the podcast.

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India’s first radio broadcast on Prime Minister’s ‘Mann Ki Baat’, recalling World Radio Day trip https://colinmarshallradio.com/indias-first-radio-broadcast-on-prime-ministers-mann-ki-baat-recalling-world-radio-day-trip/ Sun, 13 Feb 2022 11:08:29 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/indias-first-radio-broadcast-on-prime-ministers-mann-ki-baat-recalling-world-radio-day-trip/ Radio is a powerful medium to celebrate humanity in its diversity and provides a platform for democratic discourse. It remains one of the most popular media platforms in the world. Radio can shape a society’s experience of diversity because of its unique ability to reach large audiences and serve as a platform for all voices […]]]>

Radio is a powerful medium to celebrate humanity in its diversity and provides a platform for democratic discourse. It remains one of the most popular media platforms in the world. Radio can shape a society’s experience of diversity because of its unique ability to reach large audiences and serve as a platform for all voices to be heard and represented. Radio stations serve diverse communities, offer a variety of programs, opinions and content, and reflect the diversity of their audiences through their organizations.

According to several international studies, radio remains one of the most trusted and widely used media in the world. Therefore, the theme for the 2022 edition of World Radio Day has been decided to be “Radio and Trust”.

In honor of World Radio Day 2022, UNESCO calls on radio stations around the world to commemorate the 11th edition of this event and over a century of radio. The World Radio Day sub-themes are Trust in Radio Journalism, Trust and Accessibility and Trust and Sustainability of Radio Stations.

Initial phase of radio in India

The Radio Club broadcast the first radio program in India in June 1923. Daily broadcasts included music and talk for two or three hours each day.

Nevertheless, the stations were forced to close in 1927 due to lack of financial support. The next step was to establish a broadcasting service, which began broadcasting in Bombay in July 1927 and in Calcutta a month later under an agreement between the Indian government and the Indian Broadcasting Company Ltd.

India’s first radio station was established in Delhi on June 8, 1936. The term “All India Radio” was coined by Sir Lionel Fielden on June 8, 1936. A former senior BBC producer, he worked as a broadcast controller in India for five years. and was one of the eminent persons to establish All India Radio (AIR).

India’s national public radio station, All India Radio (AIR), is officially known as Akashvani. It is the largest radio network in the country and the world and offers a variety of programs such as drama section, FM section, national service, etc.

All India Radio Signature Tune

A brand new melody was also introduced in the same year. AIR’s signature tune was based on Raag Shivaranjini and was composed by Walter Kaufman, a Czech Jew who fled Europe in fear of Nazi onslaught. In 1934 he came to India and lived in Bombay for twelve years, where he worked in the music department of AIR. While there, he conducted extensive research on Indian music and even worked on Hindi films.

AIR – the largest media organization

AIR has become one of the largest media organizations in the world, thanks to its phenomenal growth. With a network of 262 radio stations, AIR reaches nearly 92% of the national population and almost all of its territory. The popularity of the radio station only grew over time. PM Modi’s “Mann Ki Baat” is now available on AIR.

Also Read: From Top Industrialist to Banning Market by SEBI, What Led to Downfall of Anil Ambani?

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Barrett Sports Media’s Top 20 Sports Radio Program Directors in the Big Market in 2021 https://colinmarshallradio.com/barrett-sports-medias-top-20-sports-radio-program-directors-in-the-big-market-in-2021/ Fri, 11 Feb 2022 12:56:49 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/barrett-sports-medias-top-20-sports-radio-program-directors-in-the-big-market-in-2021/ We’ve reached the end of the first week of the 7th Annual BSM Top 20. We’ve featured the Top 20 National Shows, Major Morning, Midday, and Afternoon Market Shows, as well as the Mid Market Morning, Midday and afternoon shows. Thank you to everyone who took the time this week to share the Top 20 […]]]>

We’ve reached the end of the first week of the 7th Annual BSM Top 20. We’ve featured the Top 20 National Shows, Major Morning, Midday, and Afternoon Market Shows, as well as the Mid Market Morning, Midday and afternoon shows. Thank you to everyone who took the time this week to share the Top 20 lists and congratulate those recognized on social media. It’s very appreciated.

As you browse the selections, remember that the lists represent the collective opinions of 46 industry leaders. Yours truly does not vote. I would like to thank Stephanie Eads, Dylan Barrette and Demetri Ravanos for helping me through the Top 20 process, and Point-to-point marketing to be our exclusive sponsor of this year’s Top 20. Tim Bronsil and its staff are a valuable resource for many in the media industry, and if you are unfamiliar with their work, you should take the time to learn more. This can be done by clicking here.

When it comes to voting, here are a few things to understand.

#1 – These results are based on 2021 performance. 2022 changes have no impact on these results. This means that program directors such as Jeff Rickard, who recently left WEEI, were eligible since he scheduled the station until the end of 2021. On the other hand, PDs such as Danny Zederman and Sean Thompson , who recently got opportunities in Chicago and Phoenix were ineligible as they did not work in the position in 2021. Our only rule since this series began in 2016 is that an individual/show must complete the year with the station where he works in the same position for which he was hired.

#2 – Our leadership panel is made up of program directors and corporate executives from a number of leading broadcast companies including Audacy, iHeart, Cumulus, Beasley, Hubbard, Good Karma Brands, ESPN Radio, FOX Sports Radio , SiriusXM, Spotify and independently owned and operated radio stations. . We involve a large number of people in order to receive feedback from all parts of the country, as well as to prevent the results from strongly favoring one company.

#3 – A total of 27 programmers were eligible to vote in the major market sports radio program director category.

#4 – Our leadership panel selected the top 20 program directors using a few factors; station success, cross-platform excellence, industry respect, brand reputation and creative ideas. Keep in mind that our constituents live in different cities, have different tastes and experiences, and work for different companies, so some factors may be valued more or less by individual. It’s not a perfect science, but it’s the best system we can think of to present the best of sports radio.

Which brings us to this year’s ranking of sports radio directors in major markets. The top prize this year goes to 98.5 The Sports Hub’s, Rick Radzik. The Boston sports radio station, which won the Top 20 awards this year, has had a monster performance in each quarter, helping The Hub become the number one revenue earner among all sports stations. With Rick at the helm, business and listening exploded. Rick received a good fight from WFAN’s Spike Eskin, who finished 2nd. Radzik earned the most Top 5 votes of any PD, including seven (7) first place votes. Eskin had more 1st place votes, ten (10) but less top 5. BSM congratulates Rick and the entire 98.5 The Sports Hub team on taking home this year’s highest honor, along with all the PDs who earned a spot on this year’s list.

Now here are the full results of “Top 20 Sports Radio Program Directors in BSM’s Large Market in 2021!”

Additional notes:

  • Rick Radzik obtained seven (7) 1st place votes and a category of twenty-two (22) top 5 votes to retain the WFANs Spike Eskin of twelve (12) points. Eskin led the category with the most votes for first place, taking ten (10) of them.
  • 21-25 was occupied by Rich Moore of Sports Radio KJR in Seattle, Jeff Rickard from WEEI to Boston, Adam Klug from 97.3 The Fan in San Diego, Matt Edgar from 680 The Fan in Atlanta, and Kyle Brown of 710 ESPN in Seattle.
  • The closest battles saw Dave Tapper finish 3 points ahead of Brian Longand Ryan Hurley edge armen williams of 4 points.
  • Of the 27 programmers eligible this year, 7 received at least one vote for 1st place.

Here is the remaining schedule for the Top 20 BSM of 2021.

  • monday 14 february = Top 20 Major/Mid-Market Sports Radio Stations of 2021
  • tuesday 15 february = The 20 Best Original Sports Podcasts/Specialty Picks of 2021

To see previous years of BSM Top 20 results, click here.

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An exhibit showcases the history of radio station WGY https://colinmarshallradio.com/an-exhibit-showcases-the-history-of-radio-station-wgy/ Thu, 03 Feb 2022 17:49:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/an-exhibit-showcases-the-history-of-radio-station-wgy/ The town of Schenectady, headquarters of General Electric, was once a broadcasting hotbed. One of the first commercial radio stations in the country began broadcasting 100 years ago. A new exhibit at the Museum of Innovation and Science celebrates WGY’s history. WGY was established by GE in 1922 and still operates today under various owners […]]]>

The town of Schenectady, headquarters of General Electric, was once a broadcasting hotbed. One of the first commercial radio stations in the country began broadcasting 100 years ago. A new exhibit at the Museum of Innovation and Science celebrates WGY’s history.

WGY was established by GE in 1922 and still operates today under various owners as a news/talk station. The station’s history is currently on display at miSci in a photo exhibit titled WGY: Radio’s Laboratory Celebrates Its Centennial.

Chris Hunter, the museum’s vice president of collections and exhibitions, showed me around the exhibit located in a new gallery inside the museum.

“So it was about 10and licensed commercial station in 1922. And because it was formed by GE’s advertising department, and not so much the engineers who formed many other early radio stations, they really put a lot of emphasis on entertainment and, in a way, to the development of broadcasting. ”

The exhibit contains 50 photos, from the station’s early days through 1980. There are photos of staff performing radio dramas, celebrities like Amelia Earhart and Harry Houdini, and New York Governor Franklin D. Roosevelt.

“So this is one of Roosevelt’s first fireside chats. They became really famous once he became president and he gave these personal talks every weekend, kind of comforting the people during the Great Depression and WWII, but he kind of perfected the format while he was Governor of New York State here on WGY.

WGY was NBC’s first affiliate and during World War II provided news to the nation.

The exhibit includes archival broadcasts. This clip is from a 1952 anniversary event, featuring the voice of another presidential candidate.

[Archive sound of Calvin Coolidge]

“Oh yeah, the punchline behind Coolidge’s recording is that his voice was very nasal and he heard it the first time and was like, ‘I don’t talk like that, I sound horrible. And his wife was told, ‘No, that’s exactly how you talk,'” Hunter said.

The radio dial wasn’t as cluttered in the early days of WGY as it is today. Hunter explains that WGY’s signal could be heard across New York and neighboring states.

“Because it became a centerpiece for GE to show off its new transmission gear, it gained outsized influence.”

Hunter said GE’s experimentation with a 100,000 and 200,000 watt transmitter in the 1930s brought WGY to San Francisco.

Hunter says that in the early years, commercial radio stations served a similar purpose to today’s public-access television. WGY was a community station.

“Each station has done pretty much everything. WGY would have a classical music program, they would have swing music, they would have country music, they would have a women’s program, they would have religious programs. And everything was grouped in one station.

This is archival audio from a basketball game in 1929…

(Archive sound of a basketball game)

The WGY: Radio’s Laboratory Celebrates Its Centennial exhibit is on view at miSci in Schenectady through May 8and.

Note: Archival photos and sound provided to WAMC by miSci

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How a Fisherman-Run Radio Station in South India is Changing Lives https://colinmarshallradio.com/how-a-fisherman-run-radio-station-in-south-india-is-changing-lives/ Wed, 02 Feb 2022 17:57:18 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/how-a-fisherman-run-radio-station-in-south-india-is-changing-lives/ Kadal Osai FM, run by the community, has helped to educate the people of Pamban, a small island in Tamil Nadu, and to raise social and environmental awareness. On Pamban, a small island inhabited by over 100,000 people in the southern Indian state of Tamil Nadu, Kadal Osai 90.4 FM is not just a radio […]]]>

Kadal Osai FM, run by the community, has helped to educate the people of Pamban, a small island in Tamil Nadu, and to raise social and environmental awareness.

On Pamban, a small island inhabited by over 100,000 people in the southern Indian state of Tamil Nadu, Kadal Osai 90.4 FM is not just a radio station. It is a lifeline.

Run by a dozen fishermen to empower their community – one that represents 80% of the island’s population – the radio station is the first community media initiative in India exclusively for fishermen by fishermen.

Started by a fisherman, Armstrong Fernando, about five years ago, Radio Kadal Osai (Sound of the Sea) is now a 12-member team, researching, presenting and broadcasting news to islanders.

On Pamban, people are highly dependent on the sea. They engage in fishing or tend to the tourism sector by running small hotels and driving taxis.

The 24/7 channel provides timely weather updates for those who brave the deep waters to fish the sea, warns them of inclement weather and also helps them identify potential fishing spots.

The community radio station has also helped create alternative livelihoods and raise awareness of societal issues and marine conservation.

“Our job is to protect the sea for people,” says Lenin, who works as the station’s programming coordinator.

“People here are very simple and hardworking. At first when we started the radio there was a lot of resistance to the idea. People apprehended us. But now that they have started to reap the benefits of a community media, they come to our radio station themselves and want to share their experiences,” he said. World TRT.

Prior to the establishment of Kadal Osai, the people of Pamban could only listen to the low frequencies of Ceylon Radio based in Sri Lanka, due to its proximity. India’s national public broadcaster All India Radio also lacked sufficient reach.

Kadal Osai Radio Jockey (RJ) interviews a native of Pamban Island. The 24/7 channel provides timely weather updates for anglers. ()

Sabeer, 40, who has worked as a fisherman for two decades, believes the introduction of Kadal Osai has transformed the lives of islanders.

“They share the latest information relevant to us (fishermen). We didn’t know about these things before. Important government projects and vacancies are shared, along with other information such as the location of local vaccination camps,” said said Sabeer. World TRT.

Initially, the radio station broadcast for a few hours a day, but as its popularity grew, programs had to be broadcast around the clock.

Lenin believed that people experience a sense of authenticity when information is broadcast over the airwaves.

“The radio has a great influence in the lives of the people who listen to it [compared to] Television, social networks or word of mouth. People recognize that there is little possibility of being misinformed about this medium.”

Help with marine conservation

In addition to announcements related to the welfare of fishermen and the broadcast of traditional music, the community radio also shares useful information to protect and conserve ocean resources, reporting endangered species such as sea turtles and asking fishermen to save them if they are caught in their nets.

When the Pamban fishermen deployed their nets, the turtles often got tangled with the fish. Turtle meat was commonly eaten, thus endangering rare species.

As part of a special initiative, Radio Kadal Osai has started offering fishermen INR 1,000 ($13.35) if they release trapped turtles into the ocean while capturing the moment on their phone.

“It has become a huge success. Many fishermen have sent us videos of them releasing turtles into the sea. We give them cash rewards and also announce their names on the radio. It has also helped raise awareness of the conservation of sea turtles,” said Gayathri Usman, Kadal Osai’s station manager.

The station and its awareness campaigns have also helped to curb open defecation on the island, provided sustainable fishing practices and educated fishermen about environmental pollution.

“People are no longer taking plastic bags to the sea. They are cautious and aware that sea pollution would directly affect their livelihoods,” Usman adds.

Programs on climate change, women’s empowerment, and loans and grants available to fishers were also popular.

Children on the island attend an awareness program on the radio station.

Children on the island attend an awareness program on the radio station. (Kadal Osai FM)

During the current coronavirus pandemic, the radio is also working hard to educate people on pressing issues such as vaccine hesitancy, testing and physical distancing.

“Before, people would discriminate if someone was infected with the virus. It was like a taboo. A lot of fake news had crept into people’s minds and we had to work a lot on fact-checking for them. In the end, we were successful in giving people the correct perspective,” Usman says.

The struggle for a sustainable model

While a host of such community media initiatives have been undertaken in the country, very few have matched the success of Kadal Osai.

This is largely thanks to the sustainable business model adopted by radio.

“Our trust has a building that has about 12 stores. We [are sustained by] rental income and donations from members of our trust and various male fisher associations,” says Usman.

“We also receive projects from various international organizations like UNICEF and the Ministry of Culture and the Commonwealth Educational Media Center for Asia (CEMCA) which helps us to develop continuously with the aim of continuing to work” , she adds.

Unfortunately, this has not been the case with many such local radio stations in the country.

Experts say license fraud has hampered prospects for a thriving community radio ecosystem in India.

“Ideally, a community radio should be owned by a community,” says Danish Iqbal, a radio expert and professor at the Mass Communication Research Center (MCRC) in Delhi.

“Unfortunately, in India, most community radio stations are sanctioned by government-owned educational institutions. Many licenses have also been contributed by private educational institutions on behalf of educational NGOs.”

Source: World TRT

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Trisha Kehaulani Watson: Radio station layoffs are a blow to Hawaiian music https://colinmarshallradio.com/trisha-kehaulani-watson-radio-station-layoffs-are-a-blow-to-hawaiian-music/ Sun, 16 Jan 2022 10:06:25 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/trisha-kehaulani-watson-radio-station-layoffs-are-a-blow-to-hawaiian-music/ I have a weakness for Hawaiian music. It wasn’t just my childhood music, but my grandparents loved Hawaiian music. He played all over their house every time we went to visit. It served as the base for all family gatherings. My uncle played in the Olomana band so his teammate Haunani Apoliona played my first […]]]>

I have a weakness for Hawaiian music. It wasn’t just my childhood music, but my grandparents loved Hawaiian music. He played all over their house every time we went to visit. It served as the base for all family gatherings.

My uncle played in the Olomana band so his teammate Haunani Apoliona played my first baby luau. Uncle Jerry Santos often played in our garage or in the garden of the house in which we had a paina this weekend.

These were not concerts. They were just how we celebrated. Almost everyone picked up a guitar or a ukulele. Everyone sang.

As a child, I had no idea of ​​the extraordinary nature of these regular events. I remember lying on our living room floor, with its yellow shag carpet, wearing my dad’s Country Comfort eight-track tape. Hawaiian music is the soundtrack of my life.

Hawaiian music is a big part of the fabric that makes the islands so special. He always managed to straddle worlds: he would live in backyards and still support himself by working in Waikiki or other resort areas.

The woes of the pandemic

I am now married to a Hawaiian musician, Matt Sproat, and I can say from my front row seat to this world that Covid-19 has been a devastating blow. My husband, a full time musician, was actually on tour in 2020 when the shutdowns started. He returned home worried about what the pandemic would mean.

The loss of tours, concerts and other events has been crushing for the Hawaiian music industry – not only for musicians, but also for entertainers, DJs, sound engineers and all members of this once robust industry. . Government mandates have been slow to allow live music to return, even with Covid precautions in place.

Hawaiian music stations have been a lifeline, though radio DJs have also taken a hit when big events have been canceled.

“This has been a tough year for radio announcers during the pandemic,” said veteran broadcaster Billy V. “Some have had to work remotely; meanwhile, at the radio stations themselves, what would typically be a bustling hub of activity is continually a ghost town, as minimal crews and protocols are in effect.

Last week, to the surprise of staff and the public, Summit Media, the parent company of four local radio stations – Hawaiian 105, KCCN FM 100, Power 104.3 and KRATER 96 FM – laid off 20 employees.

These included longtime radio veterans Shannon Scott, Gregg Hammer and Billy V. Station general manager Andrew Rosen and operations manager Wayne Maria were also fired. Traffic reporter Danielle Tucker was also fired.

Summit Media Layoffs Radio Veterans Danielle Tucker, Shannon Scott, Mele Apana, Lina Girl, Billy V, Iolani Palace
Radio veterans Danielle Tucker, Shannon Scott, Mele Apana, Lina Girl and Billy V pose outside Iolani Palace after being told of mass layoffs at Summit Media. Courtesy of Lina Girl and Billy V/2022

Unplanned layoffs

As their shows continue, largely with music and less banter, the layoffs have raised concerns in local and Hawaiian communities that Summit Media, which is based in Birmingham, Alabama, was giving an early signal that he might stop supporting local or Hawaiian music.

New Summit Media/Honolulu President Patti Ponimoi declined to comment on the layoffs, referring questions to the Alabama headquarters. Summit Media promised in a statement to Hawaii News Now that “it will continue the tradition of Hawaiian music and celebrate the culture.”

Summit Media provided no reason for the sudden layoffs. And it’s hard to know what the loss of so many personalities will mean or look like in the months ahead.

I couldn’t do the job. I don’t have the energy. It’s a job that requires a constant supply of energy that I would find exhausting.

“As radio personalities, we thrive on this business hub; this chance to interact physically and mentally. But when you do that remotely or virtually, it really numbs the experience,” said Billy V, who is also a regular on HNN’s ‘Sunrise’ morning show. “You try to give the best energy when you’re in the studio, and you do your best, but you always wish you could give more. The best thing though is that we continually get energy from our audience who always appreciate and give aloha back.

Local radio has been one of the few places where Hawaiian voices have consistently played a prominent role. Even though the DJs weren’t Hawaiian, Hawaiian issues and news were a constant thread. It was a space where the local culture, including the pidgin, was showcased.

Hawaiian musicians certainly have a deep appreciation for Hawaiian music radio‘s contribution to Hawaiian culture.

“Over the generations, Hawaiian music radio has always served as an important catalyst for showcasing cultural pride and identity through music and mele,” said musician and kumu hula Keali’i Reichel.

“It is the singular place on the airwaves where our collective Hawaiian communities across the pae ʻaina are able to connect, listen, sometimes engage, learn and bask in the brilliance of our kupuna. All in real time,” Reichel added. “It’s a space in which artists old and new fuse alongside the radio personalities who have kept their hand on the pulse of our lahui.”

Hawaiian music, Hawaiian voices

Reichel is right. Hawaiian music radio has always been about more than music. It has been a space where Hawaiians and Hawaiian issues have been amplified.

Much of this wealth comes from the DJs themselves; people like Billy V or Mele Apana.

“Mento” Mele Apana left Hawaiian 105 last year, but she’s a perfect example of the type of voice that’s valuable and needed on radio. She is the archetype of the “crazy tita”. She’s that crazy friend everyone has – the one who’s both outrageous and kind. And on the radio, as part of the Kolohe Crew, she became the crazy friend of all listeners and commuters.

The entire Kolohe Crew dealt with that kind of authentic local vibe – hilarious, unexpected, and real, without being offensive or mean. They were just funny and didn’t need to be at the expense of others.

Hawaiian radio has also been a space where new Hawaiian musicians have had the opportunity to be heard.

It was on Hawaiian radio that I first heard Keali’i Reichel when he released his debut album “Kawaipunahele”. Hawaiian Music Radio was where most of us first learned about new music and bands. Radio announcers are the facilitators of this growth and this process.

And while Summit Media says it remains committed to Hawaiian music and culture, it’s hard to know what it will be like without many of the personalities who have become synonymous with Hawaiian music radio in Hawaii.

Reichel sums it up perfectly: “With all the changes in Hawaiian radio over the past decade – and more recently – we hope this isn’t a harbinger of things to come.”

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