reserved source – Colin Marshall Radio http://colinmarshallradio.com/ Fri, 25 Mar 2022 14:18:59 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://colinmarshallradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-1-1-120x120.png reserved source – Colin Marshall Radio http://colinmarshallradio.com/ 32 32 WHMI 93.5 FM radio station – Livingston County Michigan News, weather, traffic, sports, school updates and the best classic hit https://colinmarshallradio.com/whmi-93-5-fm-radio-station-livingston-county-michigan-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hit-12/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 13:09:17 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/whmi-93-5-fm-radio-station-livingston-county-michigan-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hit-12/ [ad_1] Max Mumby / Indigo / Getty Images (LONDON) – Duchess Kate begins 2022 with a milestone birthday. The Duchess of Cambridge turns 40 on January 9, a birthday she is expected to celebrate privately with her family. Kate, the wife of Prince William and mother of three, appears to be starting her new decade […]]]>


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(LONDON) – Duchess Kate begins 2022 with a milestone birthday.

The Duchess of Cambridge turns 40 on January 9, a birthday she is expected to celebrate privately with her family.

Kate, the wife of Prince William and mother of three, appears to be starting her new decade with a renewed emphasis on her royal role.

In the nearly 11 years that she married Prince William at Westminster Abbey, she has become one of the most popular members of the British Royal Family.

And in recent years, Kate has taken on an increasingly prominent role in the Royal Family amid family changes.

At 95, Queen Elizabeth II has reduced her public commitments, especially since a brief hospitalization in October. And Prince Harry and Duchess Meghan’s decision to step back as royals has left William and Kate, now the only royals of their generation, to take on more duties.

The growing public profile was a “significant transformation” for Kate, who was propelled into the public limelight when she started dating William while in college, according to the royal ABC News contributor. , Victoria Murphy.

“I think her desire to do a good job, to be loved by the audience and respected by the family was palpable at first, and she was clearly very nervous when the spotlight was on her from speaking in. public, ”Murphy said. “She built up her workload very gradually, initially taking on a small number of sponsorships and taking time before making solo appearances and speeches.”

“But over the years Kate has gained tremendous confidence and is now a driving force behind the way she and William work and the causes they champion,” she said.

It was Kate, for example, who came up with the idea to focus on mental health as a cause, according to Murphy, which spawned the highly successful Heads Together campaign that started in 2016 and continues to be central to William and Kate’s work to this day. .

As the Cambridges prepare to one day become King and Queen Consort, Murphy says audiences can expect to see Kate grow even more in her role as she focuses on causes close to her heart.

“I’ve always thought Kate is a team player, a poise and a good listener, and these things have served her well over the year,” said Murphy. “I think she also has a lot of compartmentalizing ability, as the Queen has been said to do, which is an important quality in dealing with the pressures of the public role.”

Since becoming a mom eight years ago, Kate has focused much of her attention on supporting new parents and young children.

In early 2020, just before the onset of the coronavirus pandemic, Kate launched a nationwide inquiry to explore what Britons think about child rearing, with a focus on children under 5 years.

Then, in June last year, the Duchess launched the Royal Foundation Center for Early Childhood, which she says is designed to “raise awareness of why the first five years of life are so important to our people. future outcomes in life, and what we can do as a society to seize this golden opportunity to create a happier, more mentally healthy and more stimulating society. “

At the same time, Kate and the Royal Foundation, the charitable arm of William and Kate, published “Big Change Starts Small”, a research report on early childhood development.

Kate has also focused much of her work on including the outdoors in early childhood development. She helped design a ‘Back to Nature’ garden at the RHS Chelsea Flower Show in 2019, and the following year was named co-chair of the UK Scout Association, marking the first time that a royal woman has held the title of president or co-chair of the scouts.

“I think what’s changed over the past few years is that it’s become very clear what the main areas of Kate’s work are in a way that feels a lot more focused and immersive,” Murphy said. “She has always been interested in the outdoors and young people, but the fact that she makes these areas the cornerstones of her work has become much more evident.”

Murphy said Kate’s commitment to the cause of early childhood education is particularly striking, noting: “This is a difficult and very broad area, but she has shown real and serious commitment to it. over a long period of time which I think has earned him a lot of respect from the people who work in this field.

During the pandemic, Kate offered her support to parents, students and teachers, and spoke about the experience of quarantining and leading virtual learning for her own children, Prince George, 8 , Princess Charlotte, 6, and Prince Louis, 3.

The glimpse Kate gave her and William’s family life is just one example of how the Duchess’s growing confidence made her feel more comfortable, according to Murphy.

Kate and William launched a YouTube channel last year, where they share more behind-the-scenes content. And in 2020, Kate gave a rare interview to a podcast focused on motherhood, where she opened up about her mother’s guilt.

“The [podcast] It was a courageous move because it could have backfired on people if people had criticized the fact that she had access to a lot more help than most, “Murphy said.” But it ended up being being one of the best things she could have done because it made it clear how active she is and how she is raising her three children. “

Kate has also been more public in recent years about her own passions, whether playing in sports, like the tennis match that a big fan Kate played with US Open winner Emma Raducanu. last year, or photography.

Kate, a college art student who is often the photographer behind family photos shared with the public, started a photography project, “Hold Still,” last year to capture life during the coronavirus pandemic.

The photographs were compiled into a book in collaboration with the National Portrait Gallery, of which Kate is a patron.

Most recently, in December, Kate hosted her first Christmas carol concert at Westminster Abbey, honoring the people and organizations who have supported their communities during the pandemic.

During the concert, Kate delivered a surprise performance, showing one of her unknown passions, the piano, when she accompanied singer Tom Walker.

“These things show a willingness to step forward and show us more of who she is and what she loves,” Murphy said.

And while Kate seems to be more in her element when she’s outdoors or with kids, she’s also happy to embrace the “glamor side of royal life,” according to Murphy.

She was stunned in a gold evening gown at the world premiere of the latest James Bond film in September and won accolades the following month for wearing a recycled Alexander McQueen dress at the inaugural Earthshot Prize Awards.

“Over the years there has been a lot of excitement when she has worn tiaras from The Queen’s Collection,” said Murphy. “And even a decade into her public role, she still easily commands all of the front pages whenever she makes a red carpet appearance.”

Copyright © 2022, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

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WHMI 93.5 FM radio station – Livingston County Michigan News, weather, traffic, sports, school updates and the best classic hit https://colinmarshallradio.com/whmi-93-5-fm-radio-station-livingston-county-michigan-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hit-11/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 13:54:03 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/whmi-93-5-fm-radio-station-livingston-county-michigan-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hit-11/ [ad_1] Eric Lee / Bloomberg via Getty Images (NEW YORK) – As the COVID-19 pandemic swept the world, more than 5.4 million people have died from the disease worldwide, including more than 832,000 Americans, according to real-time data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Johns Hopkins University Engineering. In the United States, about […]]]>


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Eric Lee / Bloomberg via Getty Images

(NEW YORK) – As the COVID-19 pandemic swept the world, more than 5.4 million people have died from the disease worldwide, including more than 832,000 Americans, according to real-time data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Johns Hopkins University Engineering.

In the United States, about 62.3% of the population is fully vaccinated against COVID-19, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Here is how the news is evolving. Every hour in the East:

06 Jan 15:55
About 126,000 Americans hospitalized with COVID-19

An estimated 126,000 Americans are currently hospitalized with COVID-19, according to new data from the US Department of Health and Human Services.

Of these patients, about a sixth – or 21,000 – are in intensive care units.

The spread of the omicron variant is bringing the United States closer to the hospitalization record set last winter when 140,000 patients infected with the virus were hospitalized.

Meanwhile, the country records an average of 554,000 new cases of COVID-19 every day, five times more than a month ago, according to federal data.

Over the past week, the United States has reported an estimated 3.88 million infections with COVID-19, which on average represents about six Americans who test positive every second.

-Arielle Mitropoulos from ABC News

06 Jan 14:34
More than 800 LA firefighters and police officers tested positive

More than 800 Los Angeles Fire and Police Department personnel have tested positive for COVID-19, Mayor Eric Garcetti said Thursday.

Currently, 505 police officers and 299 firefighters are in quarantine after receiving positive results.

“These are big numbers. Figures that reflect the personnel issues we all face,” Garcetti said at a press conference outside a fire station.

He added that five out of six employees in the two departments are fully immunized, in line with the immunization mandate put in place for city employees.

Garcetti said that despite the number of officers and firefighters absent from work, the city is still protected.

“Both LAPD and LAFD have maintained the levels of personnel necessary to keep Angelenos safe, and we have maintained levels of personnel to make sure you, your family and our communities are safe,” he said. -he declares.

Jan 06, 12:33 pm
WHO says global cases rose 71% last week

Global cases of COVID-19 “have risen sharply,” the World Health Organization wrote in its weekly epidemiological update released Thursday.

Cases of the virus increased 71% in the week ending Jan. 2 from the previous week, meaning 9.5 million new COVID-19 infections have been reported globally, according to the ‘WHO.

The Americas saw the largest increase at 100%, followed by Southeast Asia at 78% and Europe at 63%.

The United States recorded the most cases of COVID-19 last week, followed by the United Kingdom, France, Spain and Italy.

The WHO added that there had been a 10% decrease in the number of new deaths from the previous week with more than 41,000 virus-related deaths recorded.

January 06, 11:17
1.3 million people in UK have long-standing COVID, data shows

It is estimated that 1.3 million people in the UK suffer from a lengthy COVID, according to new data released Thursday by the UK Office for National Statistics.

Long COVID is a condition in which patients who recover from the virus still show symptoms for weeks – even months or years – later.

The ONS said the figure, which is based on self-reported symptoms, equates to 2% of the population living with long-term COVID.

Fatigue was the most common symptom, reported by 51% of those surveyed. Other common symptoms included loss of smell (37%), shortness of breath (36%), and difficulty concentrating (28%).

About 64% said their long symptoms of COVID made it difficult for them to carry out their daily activities.

The longest COVID has been reported most often in people aged 35 to 69, women, people living in poorer areas or those working in health care or education, according to the ONS.

06 Jan 4:05 AM
American Medical Association criticizes new CDC guidelines

The American Medical Association, the nation’s largest medical association, criticized the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s new quarantine and isolation guidelines for COVID-19, saying the recommendations “risk spreading the virus further.” .

The CDC updated its guidelines on Dec. 27, saying asymptomatic people who test positive for COVID-19 should self-isolate for five days instead of 10.

“The American people should be able to count on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for timely, accurate and clear advice to protect themselves, their loved ones and their communities. Instead, the new quarantine and isolation recommendations aren’t just confusing, but risk spreading the virus further, ”American Medical Association President Dr. Gerald E. Harmon, in a statement.

Harmon referenced the data cited by the CDC in its rationale for shortening the isolation period, which estimates that 31% of people remain contagious five days after a positive COVID-19 test, suggesting that the data proves that thousands of Americans could resume their lives while being infected.

“With hundreds of thousands of new cases a day and more than a million positive cases reported on Jan. 3, tens of thousands – potentially hundreds of thousands – could return to work and school contagious. they’re following new CDC guidelines on ending isolation after five days without a negative test, “Harmon said.” Doctors are concerned that these recommendations put our patients at risk and could further overwhelm our healthcare system. “

Harmon said a negative COVID-19 test should be required to end isolation after a positive test, because re-entering society without knowing whether an individual is still positive ultimately risks further transmission of the virus.

While test availability remains a nationwide issue, Harmon also called on the Biden administration to increase test production and distribution, adding that “a shortage of tests at this time does not justify the omission. of a test requirement to get out of a now shortened isolation “.

-Arielle Mitropoulos from ABC News

06 Jan 03:16
Chicago cancels school for day 2

Chicago officials on Thursday canceled all public school classes amid classroom safety discussions with city teachers.

Classes were canceled on Wednesday after a majority of Chicago Teachers Union members voted in favor of distance learning amid an increase in COVID-19 cases. School officials called their action an illegal strike.

“In a time of crisis related to this pandemic, the worst thing we can do is give up science and data,” Mayor Lori E. Lightfoot said on Twitter. “If you care about our students and our families like we do, we won’t give in. We stand firm and fight to get our children back to learning in person.”

Teachers were excluded from their remote classrooms on Wednesday, according to the union. Union leaders asked members to try to log in again on Thursday, urging them to post photos on social media.

The union filed an unfair labor practice charge against the Chicago Board of Education on Wednesday.

“We have security rights and we’ve been at the negotiating table for 20 months to secure those rights,” union president Jesse Sharkey said in a statement.

Chicago’s public schools are among the largest in the country, with approximately 340,000 students in 636 schools.

06 Jan 02:43
TSA reports over 3,000 employee cases

The Transportation Security Administration reported 3,037 current COVID-19 infections on Wednesday.

The agency’s infections increased by about 16% in two days, according to data from the TSA.

The agency, which employs around 60,000 people, said it has accumulated 15,191 cases of COVID-19. The agency said 12,154 employees have recovered and 33 have died.

-Sam Sweeney of ABC News

Jan 05, 9:02 PM
CDC signs Pfizer boosters for 12-15 year olds

The director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has given children ages 12 to 15 the final green light to get Pfizer’s COVID-19 recall.

“It is essential that we protect our children and adolescents from infection with COVID-19 and complications of serious illness,” CDC director Rochelle Walensky said in a statement endorsing the recommendation of the CDC advisory committee. extend eligibility for recall.

The CDC recommends that teens between the ages of 12 and 17 receive a Pfizer booster five months after their second dose.

-Cheyenne Haslett from ABC News

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WHMI 93.5 FM radio station – Livingston County Michigan News, weather, traffic, sports, school updates and the best classic hit https://colinmarshallradio.com/whmi-93-5-fm-radio-station-livingston-county-michigan-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hit-10/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 15:18:35 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/whmi-93-5-fm-radio-station-livingston-county-michigan-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hit-10/ [ad_1] John Moore / Getty Images (NEW YORK) – In a mishmash of face-to-face, remote and delayed re-openings, millions of students across the country are set to return to school after several weeks of winter vacation. School districts in every state are using a variety of approaches and precautions to determine how best to protect […]]]>


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John Moore / Getty Images

(NEW YORK) – In a mishmash of face-to-face, remote and delayed re-openings, millions of students across the country are set to return to school after several weeks of winter vacation.

School districts in every state are using a variety of approaches and precautions to determine how best to protect children and staff amid the latest and largest outbreak of COVID-19 on record.

The return to school comes as the hospital admission rate among children has reached its peak in the pandemic. Pediatric case rates are also approaching record highs.

During an appearance on ABC NewsThis week Dr Anthony Fauci told George Stephanopoulos on Sunday that even with the surge, he was still in favor of keeping children in school as much as possible.

“I beg parents to seriously consider vaccinating their children, wearing masks in school settings, getting tests to stay when children are infected,” Fauci said. “I think all of these things put together, it’s safe enough to get these kids back to school, outweighed by the deleterious effects of keeping them out.”

Many districts in major cities across the country are moving forward with plans to reopen, with some requiring face masks or tests on students and staff before return as an added precaution. However, dozens of other districts – including Ohio, Georgia, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, and Michigan – are remotely starting the spring term.

Atlanta

Citing a rapid rise in infections locally, Atlanta public schools will open virtually Tuesday for all students and staff. The city plans to reopen in-person education on Jan. 10, according to public guidelines from the school district.

All staff are required to report to work on Monday, January 3 for mandatory COVID-19 surveillance tests.

Boston

Boston students will return to class on Tuesday as the district rolls out its share of state-provided rapid COVID-19 tests.

Over the weekend, members of the Massachusetts National Guard began providing 227,000 rapid COVID-19 tests to school districts across the state for use by teachers and staff.

Boston Mayor Michelle Wu and Boston Public Schools Superintendent Brenda Cassellius announced Monday that so far 155 teachers and school staff have reported positive COVID-19 tests.

Chicago

In Chicago, students returned to class on Monday, according to public guidelines from the school district.

Testing is only required for unvaccinated students who have traveled to an “orange” state, according to the city’s travel guidelines, which now include all states except Montana.

Unvaccinated students who are close contacts of a known case of COVID-19 should stay home and self-quarantine for 10 days. Vaccinated students who are in close contact can attend school as long as they are free of symptoms of COVID-19.

The district also distributed 150,000 take-home test kits to schools to support return.

Cleveland

Citing a “significant increase in COVID-19 cases in the community,” the Cleveland Metropolitan School District will switch to distance learning for the week of January 3.

After a professional day for the staff, students will log in and follow their class schedules from Tuesday to Friday.

Detroit

The spring semester in Detroit won’t start until later this week at the earliest.

Employees will be required to take a COVID-19 test on Monday and Tuesday in the district, according to public guidelines from the school district. All students are also encouraged to take a test in the district this week.

The district said it couldn’t start the semester online because not all of its students had laptops.

School officials said they plan to announce their plans for Thursday and Friday Wednesday afternoon or evening.

Los Angeles

Staff at all Los Angeles County schools are required to wear upgraded masks – a surgical mask or higher-level PPE, according to the latest district guidelines. It is “strongly recommended” that students wear properly fitted masks.

The district also strongly recommends that all eligible staff and students receive a booster injection.

COVID-19 testing is required for all close contacts who are allowed to stay in school immediately after exposure, regardless of vaccination or booster status.

Miami

All staff will be required to wear face masks inside any Miami-Dade County public school facility. Students are not required to wear face coverings, but masks are “strongly encouraged”.

Improved disinfection and cleaning protocols for classrooms and common areas, which were implemented at the start of the pandemic, will continue, according to the district.

New York City

Starting Monday, schools in New York City will distribute take-home COVID-19 tests to any student or staff member who has symptoms of COVID-19 or has been potentially exposed in a classroom where a positive case was identified.

“The number of transmissions is low; your children are in a safe space to learn and continue to thrive. We have lost almost two years of education… we cannot do it again,” said the mayor of New York, Eric Adams, in Stephanopoulos. This week.

Unvaccinated or not yet fully vaccinated students in Kindergarten to Grade 12 who have been in close contact with a positive COVID-19 case will no longer need to be quarantined, as long as they are free of symptoms and do not have a positive COVID-19 test.

After an exhibition, all students and adults will receive a take-home rapid test kit and take two tests over five days. For 3-K and Pre-K students, the quarantine policy will remain the same, meaning that students who were in the vicinity of a positive case will still need to be quarantined for 10 days.

Newark

Newark Public Schools began the semester Monday with distance education that will continue through January 14. The school plans to return to teaching in person on January 18.

Seattle

In-person school in Seattle is scheduled to resume on Tuesday. COVID-19 tests are available Monday for students and staff.

Washington DC

Last month, Mayor Muriel Bowser announced that DC Public Schools would require all students and staff to provide proof of a negative COVID-19 test result before returning to school on Thursday.

Schools were closed Monday due to inclement weather in the district.

The district will provide rapid and free antigen testing on Tuesday and Wednesday. DCPS families will need to upload their child’s negative test results.

Copyright © 2022, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

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WHMI 93.5 FM radio station – Livingston County Michigan News, weather, traffic, sports, school updates and the best classic hit https://colinmarshallradio.com/whmi-93-5-fm-radio-station-livingston-county-michigan-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hit-8/ Wed, 29 Dec 2021 21:36:31 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/whmi-93-5-fm-radio-station-livingston-county-michigan-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hit-8/ [ad_1] iStock / narvikk (ATLANTA) – Georgia plans to send the National Guard to hospitals and testing sites as the state sets a one-day record for COVID-19 cases. In a statement on Wednesday, Governor Brian Kemp announced that of the 2,500 troops who will eventually be deployed, a total of 196 will begin providing assistance […]]]>


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iStock / narvikk

(ATLANTA) – Georgia plans to send the National Guard to hospitals and testing sites as the state sets a one-day record for COVID-19 cases.

In a statement on Wednesday, Governor Brian Kemp announced that of the 2,500 troops who will eventually be deployed, a total of 196 will begin providing assistance on January 3.

About 100 are sent to hospitals while 96 will help the Department of Public Health at testing sites.

Kemp said that over the next few days, the Georgia Department of Community Health will assign assignments to the remaining 2,300 soldiers based on which centers need help the most.

“I want to reassure the Georgians that we have already overcome this and will do it again,” said the statement from Kemp.

“As we work diligently to provide assistance and reduce wait times for people at testing sites, we urge Georgians to be patient and compassionate towards their neighbors. “

It comes as Georgia recorded 13,670 new confirmed and probable COVID-19 cases on Tuesday, the most reported in a single day and breaking the previous record of 10,165 set on January 8.

The increase in cases has led to an increased demand for testing. Driving centers have seen cars lined up for blocks with people waiting for several hours to be checked.

Dr Lynn Paxton, chief of the Fulton County Board of Health, which includes Atlanta, told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution that the National Guard will help reduce long waits for testing.

“Basically the cavalry is coming,” she said.

In his statement, Kemp said it was encouraging to see data suggesting that people fully vaccinated with a booster are well protected and – if they have a breakthrough infection – tend to develop only mild symptoms.

The fully vaccinated and beefed up governor said he would continue to urge residents to get vaccinated, but did not plan to institute vaccines or masks.

“It is time to trust our citizens to do what is right for them and their families,” the statement said.

“That is why I will absolutely not implement measures that would shut down businesses or separate the vaccinated from the unvaccinated or the masked from the unmasked.”

This is not the first time that Georgia has requested National Guard assistance.

In August, during the state’s delta-fueled surge, Kemp deployed more than 2,500 National Guard troops to Georgia hospitals overwhelmed with COVID-19 patients.

The recent surge in cases has also led Atlanta to cancel the annual Peach Drop celebration – Georgia’s New Year’s Eve ball drop celebration. Additionally, Emory University has announced that spring semester courses will be distance learning until at least January 31.

Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

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State senator dies month after telling local radio station he was sick with Covid-19 while in El Salvador https://colinmarshallradio.com/state-senator-dies-month-after-telling-local-radio-station-he-was-sick-with-covid-19-while-in-el-salvador-2/ Sun, 19 Dec 2021 03:46:55 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/state-senator-dies-month-after-telling-local-radio-station-he-was-sick-with-covid-19-while-in-el-salvador-2/ [ad_1] By Kay Jones, CNN Washington state senator died a month after confirming to a local radio station he was in El Salvador and sick Covid19. The family of State Senator Doug Ericksen announced his death in a statement released by the Washington State Senate Republican Caucus on Saturday, but they did not indicate the […]]]>


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By Kay Jones, CNN

Washington state senator died a month after confirming to a local radio station he was in El Salvador and sick Covid19.

The family of State Senator Doug Ericksen announced his death in a statement released by the Washington State Senate Republican Caucus on Saturday, but they did not indicate the cause of his death.

“We are heartbroken to share that our husband and father passed away on Friday, December 17. Please keep our family in your prayers and thank you for continuing to respect our privacy at this extremely difficult time,” the statement said.

Ericksen represented the 42nd district of Whatcom County, from Bellingham to the Canadian border, according to his website. He was elected to the Senate in 2010 after serving six terms in the State House, the statement said.

Ericsen told KIRO Radio in November, he contracted the virus while in El Salvador. The station’s chief information officer said in a tweet that Ericksen told them he couldn’t leave the country and that there was no monoclonal antibody treatment available.

In an email sent to Washington state lawmakers on November 11, Ericksen said he “traveled to El Salvador and tested positive for COVID shortly after (he) arrived,” and asked for help with the treatment transported to the country to help with his recovery, according to the Seattle Times, who said he obtained the email from a member of the state Senate.

Ericksen had repeatedly called for the resignation of Democratic Governor Jay Inslee, in many messages on its website. Its latest press release, dated November 1, said the state was the “national leader of an authoritarian government.”

“Throughout this COVID situation, Inslee has been out of step with the rest of the country,” Ericksen said in the statement. “He says his act of revenge was based on science, but it is certainly not science understood by public health officials and elected leaders in every other state in the Union.”

Inslee posted a declaration Saturday in response to news of Ericksen’s death, saying he and his wife sent “our deepest condolences to the family, friends and colleagues of Senator Doug Ericksen. Our hearts are with them.

The-CNN-Wire
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WHMI 93.5 FM radio station – Livingston County Michigan News, weather, traffic, sports, school updates and the best classic hit https://colinmarshallradio.com/whmi-93-5-fm-radio-station-livingston-county-michigan-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hit-7/ Fri, 17 Dec 2021 15:11:37 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/whmi-93-5-fm-radio-station-livingston-county-michigan-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hit-7/ [ad_1] Klaus Vedfelt / Getty Images (PLAISTOW, NH) – Since the start of the school year, some New Hampshire teachers have said they are on edge over a new policy they say punishes those who teach oppression in the past and the present of America. “If you are raising a generation without a moral foundation […]]]>


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Klaus Vedfelt / Getty Images

(PLAISTOW, NH) – Since the start of the school year, some New Hampshire teachers have said they are on edge over a new policy they say punishes those who teach oppression in the past and the present of America.

“If you are raising a generation without a moral foundation to recognize oppression, to recognize exclusion, to recognize racial supremacy, then you are raising a generation that will be amoral when they become leaders,” said Ryan Richman, teacher at Plaistow. , New York. Hampshire.

“We will have no sense of right or wrong, for we have considered this even looking at ourselves in the mirror and recognizing that the realities of the past are criminal.”

The law states that educators cannot teach that a person’s race, sex, gender identity, or other social status is inherently superior to someone else, or that someone is inherently racist. or sexist, among other restrictions. Teachers can be reported by fellow teachers, parents, or others and punished for potentially violating this policy.

Some educators, teachers’ union members and parents have lodged a complaint, saying vague language limits their ability to teach about racial and gender oppression and can hamper discussions of American history and literature.

“We’re supposed to inspire students to think about the world as a whole, help them connect with ideas and broaden their horizons,” said Deb Howes, president of the American Federation of Teachers in New Hampshire. “They must also allow for honest teaching, history, current affairs and literature.”

She added: “You could lose your career just because you say something wrong or someone thinks you said something wrong.”

In the lawsuit, AFT-NH is joined by the American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industry Organizations, “New Hampshire public school teachers” and “parents or guardians of New Hampshire public school children.”

This new law is one of many that have arisen across the country and have been touted by conservative activists targeting “critical race theory” in K-12 schools. However, critical race theory is a discipline taught at the college and university levels, according to legal experts and academics.

He analyzes American legal systems and how they were shaped by racism and continue to impact the progression of racism in America. Educators across the country told ABC News that critical race theory is not on their agenda.

New Hampshire State Representative Jess Edwards, who co-sponsored the bill, said lawmakers have seen what is happening across the country regarding critical race theory.

GOP lawmakers have said classrooms feel divided or children feel bad about their race. Supporters of the law and similar legislation, including Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt and Texas State House Representative Steve Toth, also say certain lessons about the breed can make or offend people. white students.

“I think our experience with our fellow lawmakers made us realize that something bad is happening in society,” Edwards said.

The legislation does not mention “critical race theory” – a strategic choice to avoid inflammatory arguments against the policy, Edwards said.

He said New Hampshire lawmakers had found a parent who was trying to challenge critical race theory in individual schools, and said the school was “not really interested in listening to his position.” .

Edwards said some schools were deploying material “such as: minorities will always be oppressed in this nation, whites will always be the oppressors.”

A conservative national organization, Moms for Liberty, tweeted in November that it would offer $ 500 to New Hampshire’s first family who successfully filed a lawsuit.

Moms for Liberty did not respond to ABC News requests for comment.

“It’s very scary,” Richman said. “You have this message coming from the Education Commissioner restricting what we’re allowed to talk about, the kinds of lessons we’re allowed to talk about, what our students are allowed to talk about and the kinds of honest discussions that we can. have about race, inequality and power. And then it snowballs. “

According to the New Hampshire Department of Education, the Commission on Human Rights, and the Department of Justice, teachers are not prohibited by law from teaching United States history, and they are permitted to teach. provide students with historical concepts related to discrimination.

The policy also states that nothing in this document “should be construed as precluding discussing, as part of a larger course of academic teaching, the historical existence of the ideas and topics identified in this section”.

However, the lawsuit argues that teachers have been targeted and intimidated because of this growing controversy over race and gender inclusive education in schools under the guise of student protection.

“Teachers, including a plaintiff in this action, have been subjected to online harassment, obscenity and vicious attacks as a direct result of the climate of political intimidation created by and with the facilitation of various defendants,” we read in the trial.

Some educators argue that not only are their jobs on the line because of New Hampshire’s new policy, but their students’ education and future preparation are also at risk.

“If we don’t teach them this, then they are unprepared for the world around them,” Howes said. “They won’t understand why things work or don’t work in society at large, and they won’t be able to change the things that don’t work or support the things that work. They will have a harder time doing their job. path Through life. “

In a message to the students, Richman added, “We see you. We see your worth and we see that you have a right to have a conversation about the race, injustice, history that you deserve, and we will we fight for you so that you can be the kind of leaders our country deserves. “

Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

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WHMI 93.5 FM radio station – Livingston County Michigan News, weather, traffic, sports, school updates and the best classic hit https://colinmarshallradio.com/whmi-93-5-fm-radio-station-livingston-county-michigan-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hit-6/ Fri, 10 Dec 2021 15:28:27 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/whmi-93-5-fm-radio-station-livingston-county-michigan-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hit-6/ [ad_1] jacoblund / iStock (NEW YORK) – As the COVID-19 pandemic swept the world, more than 5.2 million people have died from the disease worldwide, including more than 793,000 Americans, according to real-time data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Johns Hopkins University Engineering. In the United States, only 60.4% of the population […]]]>


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jacoblund / iStock

(NEW YORK) – As the COVID-19 pandemic swept the world, more than 5.2 million people have died from the disease worldwide, including more than 793,000 Americans, according to real-time data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Johns Hopkins University Engineering.

In the United States, only 60.4% of the population is fully vaccinated against COVID-19, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Here is how the news is evolving. Every hour in the East:

Dec 10, 5:25 p.m.
So far, 50 million Americans receive booster injection

More than 50 million Americans have now received a COVID-19 recall, according to recently updated federal data.

More than half of fully vaccinated people 65 years of age and older have received a booster.

On average, around 2.03 million shots in total are administered each day, according to the data. More than half – 1.1 million – are booster doses.

-Arielle Mitropoulos from ABC News

Dec 10, 3:50 p.m.
Significant growth in cases expected in much of the United States, cases could double in New York

The Philadelphia Children’s Hospital PolicyLab predicts “significant” growth in cases across much of the United States over the next four weeks.

Major metropolitan areas, especially in the Northeast, are seeing significant growth in cases after Thanksgiving, forecasters say.

Cases in the New York City area are expected to at least double through December, forecasters said.

The metropolitan areas of New Jersey, Delaware and North Carolina are expected to see rapid increases in cases, forecasters said.

Forecasters also noted a “sudden” increase in cases in Florida over the past two weeks.

-Arielle Mitropoulos from ABC News

Dec 10, 1:10 p.m.
No deaths among 43 omicron patients in the United States

There have been no deaths and one hospitalization among the 43 known omicron patients in the United States, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Early indications show that omicron may cause less severe disease than previous variants, public health experts say, but it’s still too early to say for sure. It is also possible that omicron only appears less severe because many infected people have been vaccinated, younger adults.

-Sony Salzman of ABC News

Dec 10 11:31
More than 7,400 Americans admitted to hospital with COVID every day

The United States is now reporting more than 118,000 new cases every day, up nearly 85% since the end of October, according to federal data.

On average, more than 7,400 Americans are admitted to hospital with COVID-19 every day – an increase of almost 16% last week, while pediatric hospital admissions have climbed more than 40%, according to the data.

More than 7,600 Americans died from COVID-19 last week. West Virginia currently has the highest death rate in the country, followed by Wyoming, Montana and Tennessee.

-Arielle Mitropoulos from ABC News

Dec 10, 10:04 AM
Masks or vaccination documents required in all indoor public places in New York

Masks will now be mandatory in all indoor public places in New York state, unless the business or location requires proof of full vaccination, Governor Kathy Hochul said on Friday.

The new measure goes into effect Monday and lasts at least until January 15 as the state tries to disrupt a winter wave.

New York’s seven-day average case rate has jumped 43% since Thanksgiving, according to the governor’s office.

“We shouldn’t have reached the point where we are facing a winter wave, especially with the vaccine at our disposal, and I share the frustration of many New Yorkers that we have not yet passed this pandemic,” Hochul said in a statement. “I want to thank the more than 80% of New Yorkers who did what it took to get a full vaccine. If others follow suit, these measures will no longer be necessary.”

Dec 09, 7:33 p.m.
At least 25 states have confirmed cases of omicron

At least 25 states have now reported cases of the omicron variant, just over a week after California identified the first case in the United States

Iowa, Michigan and Virginia became the last states on Thursday to confirm positive cases of the worrisome new variant.

Other states with confirmed cases include Arizona, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Illinois, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska , New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Texas, Utah, Washington and Wisconsin.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention director Rochelle Walensky told The Associated Press on Wednesday that most cases were mild, although there was at least one hospitalization.

-Arielle Mitropoulos from ABC News

09 Dec, 4:22 p.m.
The daily average of cases in the United States has increased by almost 83% since October

COVID-19-related hospitalizations in the United States have increased 47% over the past month, according to federal data. Almost 80% of adult intensive care beds are full.

The United States is now reporting more than 117,000 new cases every day. The daily average of cases has jumped nearly 83% since the end of October, according to federal data.

New Hampshire has the highest case rate in the country, followed by Michigan, Minnesota, Rhode Island, New Mexico, Indiana, Vermont, Massachusetts and New York.

-Arielle Mitropoulos from ABC News

Dec 09, 2:54 p.m.
More than 2 million children aged 5 to 11 fully immunized

More than 2 million children aged 5 to 11 are now fully immunized, said White House COVID-19 data director Cyrus Shahpar.

These children are among more than 200 million Americans of all ages who are now fully immunized, according to the White House.

Shahpar’s tweet added: “Early evidence indicates that boosters increase protection against Omicron. Get boosted!”

However, about two-thirds of parents of school-aged children delay or refuse to have their youngest children immunized, according to a survey published Thursday by the nonprofit Kaiser Family Foundation.

Parents of teenagers are more willing to get their children vaccinated, but so far only about half of this age group have been vaccinated, KFF found.

The new findings come despite growing evidence that the vaccine is safe and that children and adolescents are now helping to increase the number of cases.

Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

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WHMI 93.5 FM radio station – Livingston County Michigan News, weather, traffic, sports, school updates and the best classic hit https://colinmarshallradio.com/whmi-93-5-fm-radio-station-livingston-county-michigan-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hit-5/ Sat, 13 Nov 2021 17:52:21 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/whmi-93-5-fm-radio-station-livingston-county-michigan-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hit-5/ [ad_1] Thongbun Rattankun / iStock (NEW YORK) – As the COVID-19 pandemic swept the world, more than 5 million people have died from the disease worldwide, including more than 758,000 Americans, according to real-time data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Johns Hopkins University Engineering. Only 68.5% of Americans aged 12 and older […]]]>


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Thongbun Rattankun / iStock

(NEW YORK) – As the COVID-19 pandemic swept the world, more than 5 million people have died from the disease worldwide, including more than 758,000 Americans, according to real-time data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Johns Hopkins University Engineering.

Only 68.5% of Americans aged 12 and older are fully vaccinated against COVID-19, according to data from the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Here is how the news is evolving. Every hour in the East:

November 13, 12:43 p.m.
Aaron Rodgers meets return to play post-quarantine requirements: reports

Aaron Rodgers has remained asymptomatic from COVID-19 and has followed NFL / NFLPA return-to-play protocols, ESPN reported.

“It went really well,” Green Bay Packers coach Matt LaFleur said this week, according to ESPN. “The communication has been there. He’s been in every meeting. He’s been engaged. So, it’s just that he’s not with his guys on the pitch.”

Rodgers tested positive for COVID-19 on November 3 and had to undergo a 10-day quarantine. The Packers, Rodgers and wide receiver Allen Lazard have all been fined for violating protocols jointly agreed upon by the NFL and NFL Players Association, ESPN reported.

November 12, 8:33 p.m.
4 states set to recommend COVID-19 recall for all adults

As COVID-19 cases increase across the country, at least four states are preparing to recommend booster shots for all adults before federal authorization.

Colorado Governor Jared Polis on Thursday signed an executive order declaring the entire state at high risk for COVID-19, making all fully vaccinated adults eligible to receive a booster.

“We want to make sure Coloradians have all the tools they need to protect themselves from this deadly virus and to help reduce stress on our hospitals and healthcare workers,” Polis said in a statement.

Any Coloradan aged 18 and over who is at least six months after the second dose of Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna vaccine, or two months after the single dose Johnson & Johnson vaccine, can now be boosted.

“I was relieved to have the recall two weeks ago,” Polis said, “and I strongly encourage you to do so too.”

The governor of New Mexico issued a similar order on Friday, and officials in California and West Virginia have already encouraged residents to receive a recall.

Meanwhile, Pfizer on Tuesday asked the Federal Drug Administration for recall authorization for all adults.

November 12, 6:18 p.m.
US cases up nearly 20% since mid-October

The United States currently averages about 76,000 new cases of COVID-19 per day, up nearly 20% since mid-October, according to an ABC News analysis of federal data.

North Dakota now has the highest infection rate in the country, followed by Minnesota, Alaska and Vermont.

Nationwide COVID-19 hospitalizations also increased for the fourth day in a row on Friday. More than 47,000 patients with COVID-19 are currently receiving care.

-Arielle Mitropoulos from ABC News

November 12, 7:06 am
Colorado approves COVID-19 recall for all adults

Colorado Governor Jared Polis on Thursday signed an executive order declaring the entire state at high risk for COVID-19, making all fully vaccinated adults eligible to receive a booster.

“We want to make sure Coloradians have all the tools they need to protect themselves from this deadly virus and to help reduce stress on our hospitals and healthcare workers,” Polis said in a statement.

Any Coloradan aged 18 and over who is at least six months after the second dose of Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna vaccine, or two months after the single dose Johnson & Johnson vaccine, can now be boosted.

“I was relieved to have the recall two weeks ago,” Polis said, “and I strongly encourage you to do so too.”

November 11 2:26 p.m.
COVID-related hospitalizations in the United States increase for 3rd consecutive day

Thursday marked the third day in a row that hospitalizations for COVID have increased nationwide.

Fourteen states reported a 10% increase in hospital admissions over the past week. The states are Arizona, Colorado, Connecticut, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Utah, Vermont and Wisconsin.

Total hospitalizations are down nearly 55% since mid-August.

November 10, 9:21 p.m.
COVID-19 deaths expected to continue to decline in coming weeks

The COVID-19 forecast models used by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention currently predict that the number of weekly deaths will likely continue to decline in the weeks to come, although thousands of Americans are still expected to lose their lives.

The overall model predicts that just under 15,000 additional virus-related deaths will occur in the United States over the next two weeks, with a total of around 781,500 deaths by December 4.

The model estimates that 13 states and territories in the United States have a more than 50% chance of having more deaths in the next two weeks compared to the past two weeks.

November 10, 9:15 p.m.
Federal judge overturns Texas ban on school mask warrants

A federal judge ruled Wednesday that the executive order of Texas Governor Greg Abbott banning local warrants for masks, including in schools, violated the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Since the order was issued in late July, State Attorney General Ken Paxton has sued more than a dozen school districts for issuing mask warrants, according to the court judge’s ruling. of U.S. District Lee Yeakel. In August, the Texas advocacy group Disability Rights filed a lawsuit against the state on behalf of several students with disabilities at increased risk of COVID-19, alleging it was denying them equal access to in-person learning.

“The evidence presented by the applicants establishes that applicants are denied the benefits of in-person learning on an equal basis with their peers without disabilities,” Yeakel wrote in its decision.

Yeakel also said the executive order “interferes with the ability of local school districts to meet their obligations under the ADA” by giving all authority to the governor.

Yeakel urged the state to enforce the mask warrant ban and ordered the plaintiffs to recover their legal costs from the state.

Paxton said the state “protects the rights and freedoms” of residents by banning mask warrants.

November 10, 6:43 p.m.
States Continue Mandate to Immunize Healthcare Workers

Ten states are suing the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services over the Biden administration’s vaccination mandate targeting healthcare workers.

About 17 million healthcare workers who are employed in CMS-funded locations are due to be vaccinated by January 4, 2022. They do not have the opportunity to get tested.

“The warrant is a blatant attempt to federalize public health issues involving immunization that fall within the purview of state policing,” said the complaint, which was filed by Missouri Attorney General Eric Schmitt, a Republican candidate for the Senate.

The attorneys general of Nebraska, Arkansas, Kansas, Iowa, Wyoming, Alaska, South Dakota, North Dakota and New Hampshire have joined the lawsuit, which is the ‘one of many filed against different parts of the Biden administration’s vaccine demands, but the first to target the healthcare worker mandate.

Twenty-six states are pursuing the mandate that applies to businesses, while a further handful are pursuing the mandate of federal workers. Last week, a federal court temporarily blocked the commercial vaccine rule.

Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

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Packers QB Aaron Rodgers reappears on radio show Tuesday and says: “I take full responsibility for these comments” | Football https://colinmarshallradio.com/packers-qb-aaron-rodgers-reappears-on-radio-show-tuesday-and-says-i-take-full-responsibility-for-these-comments-football/ https://colinmarshallradio.com/packers-qb-aaron-rodgers-reappears-on-radio-show-tuesday-and-says-i-take-full-responsibility-for-these-comments-football/#respond Tue, 09 Nov 2021 19:27:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/packers-qb-aaron-rodgers-reappears-on-radio-show-tuesday-and-says-i-take-full-responsibility-for-these-comments-football/ [ad_1] Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers reappeared on “The Pat McAfee Show” on Tuesday and took “full responsibility” for his comments last week about his vaccination status and being “in the crosshairs. of the crowd awakened right now “on his vaccination status. “I made comments that people might have found misleading. And for anyone […]]]>


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Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers reappeared on “The Pat McAfee Show” on Tuesday and took “full responsibility” for his comments last week about his vaccination status and being “in the crosshairs. of the crowd awakened right now “on his vaccination status.

“I made comments that people might have found misleading. And for anyone who felt misled by those comments, I take full responsibility for those comments,” Rodgers said Tuesday.

“I understand that this problem, in general, is very onerous for a lot of people because we are talking about public health. I totally respect that,” Rodgers said. “I made a decision that was in the best interest by consulting my doctors. And I understand that not everyone will necessarily understand it. But I respect everyone’s opinion.”

Rodgers told McAfee he was feeling “really good” after testing positive for Covid-19 last week.

Rodgers missed last Sunday’s game against the Kansas City Chiefs due to Covid-19 protocols. The Chiefs defeated the Packers 13-7.

During an interview on the McAfee show on Friday, Rodgers confirmed that he was not vaccinated against Covid-19 and that he was disappointed with the treatment he was receiving in the media.

Rodgers said the media was on a “witch hunt” to find out which players had been vaccinated and blamed reporters for him saying he was “immune” in August. Rodgers said if a reporter had asked a follow-up question he would have explained that he was “not an anti-vax Terran”, but a “critical thinker”.

Rogers added last week that he follows strict NFL protocols for unvaccinated players down to a “T”. Rodgers has described the tests he goes through every day, even on holidays, and believes the rules are in place to put unvaccinated people to shame. Rodgers said he tested over 300 times before testing positive this week.

He did not get the vaccine because he is allergic to an ingredient in the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines and was afraid of possible side effects from the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, he said. The decision to seek alternative treatments was “what was best for my body,” he said.

Rodgers is scheduled to play this Sunday at home against the Seattle Seahawks.

The-CNN-Wire

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WHMI 93.5 FM radio station – Livingston County Michigan News, weather, traffic, sports, school updates and the best classic hit https://colinmarshallradio.com/whmi-93-5-fm-radio-station-livingston-county-michigan-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hit-4/ https://colinmarshallradio.com/whmi-93-5-fm-radio-station-livingston-county-michigan-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hit-4/#respond Sat, 06 Nov 2021 21:20:59 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/whmi-93-5-fm-radio-station-livingston-county-michigan-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hit-4/ [ad_1] Kali9 / iStock (HOUSTON) – At least eight people have died, including two teenagers, after a crowd rushed to the stage at a massive concert in Houston, causing panic and chaos, authorities said. More than 50,000 people were in attendance for the first night of this weekend’s sold-out Astroworld music festival at NRG Stadium […]]]>


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Kali9 / iStock

(HOUSTON) – At least eight people have died, including two teenagers, after a crowd rushed to the stage at a massive concert in Houston, causing panic and chaos, authorities said.

More than 50,000 people were in attendance for the first night of this weekend’s sold-out Astroworld music festival at NRG Stadium when, at around 9:30 p.m. local time, “the crowd began to compress towards the front of the scene, ”said Houston Fire Chief Sam Pena. journalists Friday evening.

“It caused some panic and started causing injuries,” Pena said.

Twenty-five people, including one barely 10 years old, were taken to hospital, authorities said. Eleven people were transported into cardiac arrest, Pena added.

As of Saturday afternoon, 13 people were still hospitalized, including five under the age of 18, Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner told reporters in a briefing.

Those who died were between 14 and 27 years old. One was 14, another 16, two were 21, two were 23 and one was 27, the mayor said. One has not yet been identified.

“Nothing of this magnitude that any of us can remember, and certainly that I can remember, took place in this city,” said Turner.

The cause of death of the eight people will not be known until the medical examiner has completed the investigation, Pena said.

Some of those who died did not have IDs on them, Houston Police Chief Troy Finner told reporters on Friday.

A missing persons information command post has been set up in a nearby hotel. As of Saturday afternoon, no one was reported missing, officials said.

The festival ended early Friday night and was canceled for Saturday.

Pena described the chaotic scene in an interview with ABC News‘ Gio Benitez on “Good Morning America” ​​on Saturday.

“As soon as the crowds started pouring in… these people started to be trapped, basically in the front, and they started to be stepped on and people were falling and passing out,” Pena said.

A bystander said she was pushed “very aggressively”.

“It was intense, it was intense,” the viewer told “Good Morning America”. “We saw people pulling out of the crowd, and we saw some of these people unconscious.”

Madeline Eskins, who attended the concert with her boyfriend, told ABC News they tried to leave when they started being pushed from all sides towards the front of the stage but couldn’t move .

“I remember I was about to tell him to tell my son that I love him because at that point I was like, ‘I’m going to die,'” Eskins said. “I really didn’t think I was going to see him again. And then I passed out.”

Amid the chaotic scene and the mass of people, it was difficult to disperse the crowd and reach those in need of medical attention, Pena said. Festival organizer Live Nation had set up some sort of field hospital to treat minor injuries during the festival, but this was “quickly overwhelmed.”

Eskins, an intensive care nurse, said once recovered she began helping on-site medical staff treat unconscious bystanders and delegate tasks, though medical supplies, including defibrillators, are limited. .

“I was trying to control the chaos as much as possible,” she said. “Nothing could have prepared them for this.”

The cause of the incident is currently unknown, according to Finner, who said Live Nation is working with police to review video footage from the concert.

“Nobody has all the answers tonight,” he said on Friday. “There are a lot of rumors going around. We don’t have facts, we don’t have proof.

“We need to investigate and find out because it’s not fair to the producers, to anyone else involved, until we figure out what happened, what caused the surge. We don’t know. not. We’ll find out. “

Viewers knew something was wrong with a set from headliner Travis Scott. In the middle of his performance, the rapper stopped and told the crowd, “Someone has passed out here,” as captured by an Apple Music livestream of the event.

“I am absolutely devastated by what happened last night,” Scott, from Houston, said in a statement on Twitter on Saturday. “My prayers go out to the families and to all who have been touched by what happened at the Astroworld Festival.”

Scott said the Houston Police Department had their “full support” during the investigation and that he was “committed to working with the Houston community to heal and support families in need.”

Festival organizers also said they were “focused on supporting local officials” and urged anyone with information to contact police.

Live Nation also released a statement Friday saying it was “heartbroken for those lost and affected at Astroworld last night” and “is working to provide as much information and assistance as possible” to local authorities. .

The inquiries will speak with concert promoters and witnesses and examine videos of the event and location on Saturday, according to Turner.

“I requested a detailed briefing from all stakeholders, including Live Nation, Harris County, NRG Park, police, firefighters, the Emergency Management Office and other agencies, explaining how the event got out of hand resulting in the death and injury of several participants, ”he said in a previous statement.

Governor Greg Abbott said he ordered the Texas Department of Public Safety to make state resources available to support the investigation.

“What happened at the Astroworld festival last night was tragic, and our hearts are with those who lost their lives and those who were injured in the terrifying wave of crowds,” Abbott said in a statement. “Thank you to the first responders and the Good Samaritans who were there and immediately attended to those injured in the crowd.”

This isn’t the first time that there have been crowd control issues at Astroworld. There was a “similar incident” at the 2019 festival, where there was a “breach of barricades,” according to Harris County Judge Lina Hidalgo.

“Action was taken after this experience. There were stronger fences, more robust barricades, more staff and more security personnel,” Hidalgo told reporters on Saturday.

The number of Houston Police Department officers on site increased from 47 in 2019 to 76 at this year’s festival, she said. There was also additional space for crowd control, she said.

“But I want to know, the community deserves to know, if more needs to be done,” she said, calling for an independent investigation into the tragedy. “The public has a role to play here too. If you have any information about what happened, let us know.”

Frank Elaridi of ABC News contributed to this report.

Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

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