rights reserved – Colin Marshall Radio http://colinmarshallradio.com/ Fri, 25 Mar 2022 14:18:01 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://colinmarshallradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-1-1-120x120.png rights reserved – Colin Marshall Radio http://colinmarshallradio.com/ 32 32 Radio Station WHMI 93.5 FM – News, Weather, Traffic, Sports, School Updates and the Best Classic Hits from Livingston County Michigan https://colinmarshallradio.com/radio-station-whmi-93-5-fm-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hits-from-livingston-county-michigan-7/ Mon, 21 Feb 2022 13:09:07 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/radio-station-whmi-93-5-fm-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hits-from-livingston-county-michigan-7/ ANATOLII STEPANOV/AFP via Getty Images (NEW YORK) – After weeks of escalating tensions, U.S. officials have warned a Russian attack on Ukraine could happen “any day.” Russia has spent weeks building up military forces near eastern Ukraine, with more than 150,000 troops encircling Ukraine in Belarus and on the Russian side of the border, according […]]]>
ANATOLII STEPANOV/AFP via Getty Images

(NEW YORK) – After weeks of escalating tensions, U.S. officials have warned a Russian attack on Ukraine could happen “any day.”

Russia has spent weeks building up military forces near eastern Ukraine, with more than 150,000 troops encircling Ukraine in Belarus and on the Russian side of the border, according to US officials.

The Kremlin has denied warnings of an imminent invasion and claimed in recent days that it was withdrawing some troops, while US and NATO officials have said – and commercial satellite images have shown – that it there was no sign of de-escalation.

As world leaders continue to deploy diplomatic efforts to avert war between Russia and Ukraine, a senior State Department official told ABC News on Thursday that this is “perhaps the most most perilous to peace and security since the end of the cold war”.

As the conflict unfolds on a global stage, Americans are somewhat mixed about how the United States should respond. In a new Quinnipiac University poll, 57% of Americans said the United States should not send troops to Ukraine if Russia invades, and 54% support Biden’s decision to deploy troops to support allies of NATO.

Earlier this week, President Joe Biden addressed the American public and again made it clear that the United States would not send troops to support Ukraine. But he promised to defend “every square inch” of NATO territory, already deploying several thousand more troops in Europe, and to support the Ukrainian people and their government with deadly defensive weapons, economic aid and US sanctions. and crippling allies against Russia.

This high level of US involvement is necessary, he said, because “it’s not just about Russia and Ukraine.”

“This is about standing up for what we believe in, the future we want for our world, freedom, the right of countless countries to choose their own destiny. And the right of peoples to determine their own future, or the principle that a country cannot change its neighbor’s borders by force,” Biden said. “If we don’t defend freedom where it is threatened today, we will surely pay a higher price tomorrow.”

Links with NATO

To understand the vested interest of the United States in the conflict, one would have to go back to the Cold War, said Craig Albert, associate professor of political science and director of intelligence and security studies at the University of Augusta, at ABC News.

To counter Soviet aggression in Europe, the United States helped form the NATO security alliance, or the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, in 1949. In the years that followed, NATO expanded several times, including adding three former Soviet republics.

Ukraine, a former Soviet republic bordered by Russia to the east, is not a member of NATO, although in 2008 the alliance opened the door to membership. Russian President Vladimir Putin has demanded that this not happen as he seeks to limit NATO along the Russian border.

“Ukraine has attached itself to the West, to NATO,” Albert said. “They still have military agreements, treaties, economic treaties, trade treaties or relations, even though there is no NATO treaty in place between Ukraine and NATO and the states -United”

NATO members bordering Russia are also a concern. The potential impact of the Ukraine conflict on US interests is considered “significant” by the Council on Foreign Relations, which said in part that the conflict “could further deteriorate US-Russian relations and worsen if Russia was expanding its presence in Ukraine or NATO countries.”

As Russia tries to “reassert itself in the great power game”, the United States seeks to maintain the balance of power in Europe and “protect Ukraine as a buffer against Russia’s perceived aggression in Europe itself,” Albert said, noting that Ukraine is “strategically important” to Russia, the United States and NATO.

NATO is “essential to American policy in Europe”, and support for Ukraine for more than 30 years “has been an integral part of American security policy for the entire European continent”, said Matthew Pauly , associate professor of history at Michigan State University. who is an expert on Russia, Ukraine and Eastern Europe, told ABC News.

“There is no doubt that the more east-facing member states of NATO are rightly worried about Russia’s actions in Ukraine,” Pauly said. “The United States obviously considers it its duty to compel, through the responsibilities of NATO membership, to hold the line on NATO’s eastern front.”

Indeed, the United States has already sent troops into the midst of Russian aggression to support NATO’s eastern flank.

“Make no mistake, the United States will defend every square inch of NATO territory with the full force of American power,” Biden said this week. “An attack on one NATO country is an attack on all of us.”

Prevent “world war”

The United States has sent thousands more troops to Central and Eastern Europe in recent weeks, although Biden has made it clear he will not send any to Ukraine to fight Russia and stressed the importance of diplomacy to achieve de-escalation.

In an interview with NBC News anchor Lester Holt earlier this week, Biden acknowledged the risk of another assault. When asked what scenario could lead him to send troops to help Americans in Ukraine, Biden replied: “There is none. It’s a world war when the Americans and Russia start to fight each other. to shoot on.”

“We’re dealing with one of the biggest armies in the world. It’s a very different situation, and things could get crazy quickly,” he said.

The risk of the conflict escalating beyond Ukraine is “high,” ABC News national security and defense analyst Michael “Mick” Patrick Mulroy told ABC News Live this week.

“That should be a concern for everyone,” he said.

Preserving democracy and sovereignty

Another important dimension of US involvement in the crisis is its support for Ukraine as a democracy, Pauly said. Since 1991, when Ukraine declared independence, the United States has offered “substantial” foreign assistance, particularly in the 1990s, to help it emerge from the Soviet period, democratize and develop a free market economy, he said.

“Ukraine is a democracy, it’s the only really functional democracy of a few in the former Soviet space,” Pauly said. “Although democratization has had a kind of rough ride in Ukraine, it’s hard to argue that it’s not a democracy.”

“Democracy in Ukraine deserves to be protected,” he continued. “Democracy is our best guarantee against war and the best assurance of peace.”

The United States, along with its Western allies, has also expressed support for maintaining Ukraine’s sovereignty and territorial integrity against Russian aggression.

Biden said the United States was providing the Ukrainian military with weapons, training and intelligence to help it defend itself.

“Nations have the right to sovereignty and territorial integrity,” the president said on Tuesday. “They have the freedom to chart their own course and choose who they partner with.”

Impact at home

The exact impact of an invasion beyond the front lines remains uncertain. Although Biden warned the American people that there would be “consequences at home” – above all an increase in energy prices as a result.

“I’m not going to pretend it’s going to be painless,” Biden said Tuesday. “There could be an impact on our energy prices, so we are taking active steps to ease the pressure on our own energy markets and offset rising prices.”

In a limited foray into eastern Ukraine, there could be an oil price hike of $5 or $10 a barrel, according to GasBuddy’s Patrick De Haan. Currently, a $1 per barrel increase is equivalent to an increase of about 1.5 cents per gallon in the national average gasoline price. If the United States and its allies impose harsh sanctions on Russia, Russia could retaliate by limiting oil exports, he said, which would impact global markets.

If rising oil and gas prices push the Federal Reserve to be more aggressive in its monetary tightening, that could also have an impact on inflation, according to Mark Zandi, chief economist at Moody’s Analytics.

Cyber ​​warfare also remains a concern. Last month, the Department of Homeland Security warned that the US response to a possible Russian invasion could result in a cyberattack launched against the United States by the Russian government or its proxies.

There is also the impact on US troops as more military forces are deployed to support NATO countries.

“I think [Americans] should pay attention to this as it could significantly affect strategic deployments of US personnel,” Albert said. maybe a Russian invasion.”

Conor Finnegan, Molly Nagle, Sarah Kolinovsky, Zunaira Zaki, Mary Burke, Layne Winn and ABC News’ Will Kim contributed to this report.

Copyright © 2022, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

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Radio Station WHMI 93.5 FM – News, Weather, Traffic, Sports, School Updates and the Best Classic Hits from Livingston County Michigan https://colinmarshallradio.com/radio-station-whmi-93-5-fm-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hits-from-livingston-county-michigan-6/ Sat, 19 Feb 2022 19:24:42 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/radio-station-whmi-93-5-fm-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hits-from-livingston-county-michigan-6/ ABC News (NEW YORK) — The bridge that connects Hidalgo, Texas, to Reynosa, Mexico, has become a path of uncertainty and fear for thousands of families seeking opportunity. Amid continued ambiguity over US immigration policies, a migrant encampment has grown to around 2,200 in the past year, according to estimates from nonprofits working in the […]]]>
ABC News

(NEW YORK) — The bridge that connects Hidalgo, Texas, to Reynosa, Mexico, has become a path of uncertainty and fear for thousands of families seeking opportunity.

Amid continued ambiguity over US immigration policies, a migrant encampment has grown to around 2,200 in the past year, according to estimates from nonprofits working in the region. . The Sea of ​​Tents is about a block from the International Bridge in the city of Reynosa in northern Mexico.

Jessica Leon, a Salvadoran mother who has been in Reynosa for seven months with her young children, told ABC News that life in the camp is “dangerous” and “difficult”.

“We are exposed to many dangers here, like cartels, for example. Anyone can come in here at any time. We are extremely vulnerable to many dangers,” she said.

“I’ve been waiting for asylum, and we’ve been waiting for a long time. And when you don’t see results, you feel hopeless,” Leon added.

As the families face harsh living conditions, the fate of their trips depends in part on how long the Biden administration continues to use Title 42, a policy reinforced by the Trump administration during the pandemic. It allows US Customs and Border Protection to deport thousands of migrants amid the COVID-19 pandemic without giving them the opportunity to seek asylum in the United States.

Title 42 refers to a clause in the Public Health Services Act of 1944 that allows the government to prevent migrants from entering the United States during public health emergencies; however, defenders challenging the administration’s use of the order in court have argued that US law does not allow the government to deport people seeking asylum without due process.

Customs and Border Protection encountered 1.7 million people at the US-Mexico border in 2021, according to data released by the agency last month – the highest on record in a year. About 1.2 million people encountered were deported under Title 42, CBP said.

.@ABCMireya speaks exclusively to the head of the U.S. Border Patrol who is preparing his officers for a possible change in policy, as migrant families continue to be in limbo in Mexico. “I don’t have enough agents, I know I don’t have enough equipment,” he says. https://t.co/x8J07soSZR pic.twitter.com/RHhwEhUfN1

— ABC News Live (@ABCNewsLive) February 18, 2022

US Border Patrol Chief Raul Ortiz spoke exclusively to ABC News correspondent Mireya Villarreal about the growing problems along the border. Although he recognizes that Title 42 is a tool they would like to continue using, his agency is preparing for it to eventually disappear.

“We know this won’t last forever as the health pandemic begins to wane…that we may not have Title 42 forever,” Ortiz said. “So we have to make adjustments to be able to prepare for that. And so what I’m doing is making sure that I have treatment coordinators who can do some of those tasks and responsibilities, and then m to ensure our officers are safe.”

“You know, at one point I had two, three thousand officers in quarantine almost every day,” he added. “Right now I have maybe two or three hundred in quarantine. So we’re protecting ourselves better. And I think that’s some of those things that have to happen for us to be successful.”

Chief Ortiz said he recognizes declining morale and regularly reminds officers not to get drawn into political discussions.

“I know I don’t have enough agents, I know I don’t have enough equipment, and then I know I have to close some doors and gaps. That would put us in a better position to be successful.” , he added.

Title 42 was strengthened during the pandemic by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In a statement to ABC News, CDC officials said that every 60 days the agency reviews “the status of the COVID-19 pandemic and associated public health risks.”

The latest assessment completed in late January determined that the use of Title 42 remains “in effect,” the CDC said, citing the impact of the pandemic and an “increase in cases and hospitalizations since December due to the highly transferable from Omicron”. “

Across the border in Reynosa, Mexico, Felicia Rangel-Samponaro, principal of The Sidewalk School, an American nonprofit organization that runs solely on donations, told ABC News that the school “should grow at a very rapid pace” to accommodate a surge in child asylum seekers from various countries.

The organization provides clothes and food to families who lack resources and live in conditions that make cooking extremely difficult.

Rangel-Samponaro said she has seen the encampment grow every day as the number of migrants has increased and said the problem “never stopped” under the Biden administration.

“There are no white asylum seekers in this camp, and that’s what people should be asking themselves. Why is it different for white asylum seekers? ?” she says.

A few miles away, Pastor Hector Silva runs the Senda De Vida Shelter – part of the Senda De Vida Ministry House, which has been providing support to migrant families for over two decades.

Silva said most families crossing the border return after running out of money, and the shelter provides them with food and clothing as they face a life in limbo.

Jessica Leon has a brother who lives in Houston, Texas, and hopes to give her children a “good future” in the United States, because in El Salvador they struggled with poverty and lack of job opportunities.

Leon said she and her children live in a tent with a mattress that her children share, while she sleeps on the floor.

“For love and to achieve our dreams, we endure, but it’s very difficult,” she said.

Next week, the Biden administration plans to begin processing and admitting migrants forced to wait in Mexico under the Trump administration’s “migrant protection protocols,” three administration officials told ABC. News.

The Biden administration is currently engaged in a legal battle with a coalition of civil rights groups, led by the American Civil Liberties Union, over its use of Title 42.

The White House defended its use of the public health order in federal court just last month, arguing that lifting it would lead to overcrowding at DHS facilities and that an influx of migrants poses a risk to public health.

Rangel-Samponaro said migrants caught in limbo are hoping changes in US immigration policies will give them a chance for a fresh start.

“What you see is hope for Biden to win the 42nd title, which he can anytime he wants,” Rangel-Sampanaro said. Eliminating the use of Title 42 would give migrants a chance to apply for asylum, he said.

And for the families living in the Reynosa camp, the hope for a better future for their children keeps them going.

“Believe me it’s difficult, please keep us in mind because there are a lot of families who are hurting. Children are the most vulnerable,” Leon said.

ABC News’ William Gallego, Luke Barr and Quinn Owen contributed to this report.

Copyright © 2022, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

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Radio Station WHMI 93.5 FM – News, Weather, Traffic, Sports, School Updates and the Best Classic Hits from Livingston County Michigan https://colinmarshallradio.com/radio-station-whmi-93-5-fm-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hits-from-livingston-county-michigan-5/ Tue, 15 Feb 2022 12:18:11 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/radio-station-whmi-93-5-fm-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hits-from-livingston-county-michigan-5/ Stella/Getty Images (SAN FRANCISCO) — As school board meetings across the country grow increasingly contentious, parents’ pushback over COVID-19 regulations and virtual learning has brought matters to a head in San Francis. There, voters head to the polls on Tuesday to decide the fate of three school board members in an unprecedented recall election. San […]]]>
Stella/Getty Images

(SAN FRANCISCO) — As school board meetings across the country grow increasingly contentious, parents’ pushback over COVID-19 regulations and virtual learning has brought matters to a head in San Francis. There, voters head to the polls on Tuesday to decide the fate of three school board members in an unprecedented recall election.

San Francisco School Board President Gabriela López and board members Faauuga Moliga and Alison Collins could all be recalled on Tuesday.

The recall effort began in January last year as tensions rose during the pandemic, with parents saying council members misplaced their priorities, focusing their attention on social issues rather than coping strategies. pandemic reopening at a time when many other school districts were open.

In April, council members scrapped plans to rename a third of the city’s public schools after historical figures linked to injustice following backlash from parents. The board said it would review the plan after students return to in-person learning.

“They would spend the first seven hours talking about renaming the schools or they would spend the first seminar wondering if a gay dad was diverse enough to be on the parent advisory council,” Autumn Looijen, co-campaign manager at Recall the SF School Board, told ABC News. “These things are important. But when you’re dealing with this urgent crisis, they’re not what you should be focusing on.”

Each member will be elected individually and a simple majority is sufficient for the recall to succeed. If the recall is accepted, San Francisco Mayor London Breed, who supports the recall, will be responsible for appointing replacements to fill their remaining terms until an election is held for the three positions in November.

The recall energizes an influx of voters. As of Monday, more than 500,000 mail-in ballots were issued and more than 115,100 ballots were returned, according to the San Francisco Board of Elections.

Among those who vote are non-citizens, who are eligible to vote in local school board elections in San Francisco.

In this election, non-citizens of San Francisco enjoy that right more than ever. At least 258 non-citizens are eligible to vote and more than 120 have already voted in this historic election. That’s a significant increase from the previous school board election in 2020, when just 31 noncitizens cast ballots.

However, it’s not just those who live, work and have children in San Francisco who are stepping up to support the recall. Financial records show the election was largely funded by donations from major donors who do not have children in the public school district.

Campaign finance records show some of the biggest financial contributors are 95-year-old billionaire Arthur Rock and PayPal COO David Sacks, who contributed nearly $400,000 and more than $74,000, respectively. .

The large contributions of the super-rich are a sticking point for many against the recall.

“Anyone who follows this campaign knows that billionaires are trying to buy out public education,” Frank Lara, executive vice president of United Educators of San Francisco, said in an ad encouraging people to vote “No” in the San Francisco elections. Tuesday.

Reminder efforts continue to thrust the subject of education into the spotlight as it becomes more entrenched in policy textbooks. Virginia Governor Glenn Youngkin seized on the issue during his successful run for governor following comments by Democratic gubernatorial candidate Terry McAuliffe that parents shouldn’t tell schools what to teach in a debate.

It’s a trend that doesn’t escape Collins as she reflects on how she came to fight for her job.

“Honestly, I think it’s part of a national trend that we’re seeing. There’s an unprecedented number of recalls and also outrage campaigns happening around school boards,” Collins told ABC News.

In 2022, 25 school board recall efforts are launched against 66 officials nationwide, according to data tracked by Ballotpedia. There are six in California alone. It follows a year in which more than double the average recalls were issued at 92, according to Ballotpedia.

Now, López, Moliga and Collins are awaiting polls to close and votes to be tallied in an election seen as another referendum on tough COVID policies as the midterms approach.

Tuesday’s election is the first time since 1983 that voters in San Francisco have considered removing an elected official from office, when then-mayor Dianne Feinstein survived a recall vote.

Looijen and fellow parent Siva Raj’s efforts, which began around a kitchen table last year, showcase the new avenues parents are taking when it comes to their children’s educational futures after some say virtual learning has disrupted student success.

“I think there’s a common thread that public education is a vital government service. It’s one of the essential public services that we expect in any of these situations. And when you take that away , you’ll have angry and frustrated parents. Guaranteed,” Raj said.

Copyright © 2022, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

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Radio Station WHMI 93.5 FM – News, Weather, Traffic, Sports, School Updates and the Best Classic Hits from Livingston County Michigan https://colinmarshallradio.com/radio-station-whmi-93-5-fm-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hits-from-livingston-county-michigan-4/ Wed, 09 Feb 2022 01:15:57 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/radio-station-whmi-93-5-fm-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hits-from-livingston-county-michigan-4/ Lucas Ninno/Getty Images (NEW YORK) — As the COVID-19 pandemic has swept the world, more than 5.7 million people have died from the disease worldwide, including more than 908,000 Americans, according to compiled real-time data. by the Center for Systems Science and Systems at Johns Hopkins University. Engineering. About 64.2% of the population in the […]]]>
Lucas Ninno/Getty Images

(NEW YORK) — As the COVID-19 pandemic has swept the world, more than 5.7 million people have died from the disease worldwide, including more than 908,000 Americans, according to compiled real-time data. by the Center for Systems Science and Systems at Johns Hopkins University. Engineering.

About 64.2% of the population in the United States is fully vaccinated against COVID-19, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Latest headlines:
-Daily cases below 300,000 for the 1st time this year
-Omicron is estimated at 96.4% of new cases
-Michigan closes bridge to Canada amid trucker-led protests
-Oregon will lift mask mandates for indoor public spaces and schools by March 31

Here’s how the news evolves. All times Eastern.

February 08, 7:32 p.m.
Boston mayor sets out guidelines to drop vaccine proof requirement

Boston Mayor Michelle Wu outlined plans to drop evidence of the city’s vaccine requirement at indoor businesses, including bars, movie theaters and restaurants.

The city must have fewer than 200 COVID-19 hospitalizations per day, 95% of intensive care beds must be free, and the community positivity rate must be below 5%, before the requirement is removed, he said. she stated.

“The quickest way to ensure that we ease pressure on hospital capacity and reduce community positivity is to continue filling the gaps with vaccination and boosters,” Wu said in a statement.

There are no immediate plans to end the city’s mask mandate in schools, she added.

ABC News’ Arielle Mitropoulos

February 08, 7:20 p.m.
LA County maintains mask mandate for schools

While California Governor Gavin Newsom announced on Monday that he would end the statewide mask mandate next week, Los Angeles County health officials said on Tuesday that they had no immediate plans to drop their mask mandate.

Los Angeles County Health Department Director Dr. Barbara Ferrer told reporters that the county’s decision will be made based on whether the number of hospitalizations drops or if the vaccination is approved for young people. children.

The mandate will be dropped when daily hospitalizations fall below 2,500 for seven consecutive days, according to Ferrer. Once that threshold is reached, “masking will no longer be required outdoors at outdoor mega events or in indoor outdoor spaces in day care centers and K-12 schools,” Ferrer said.

Even if this threshold is not met, the mandate could be abandoned eight weeks after the approval of vaccines for children under 5 years old. Pfizer has submitted an application to the Food and Drug Administration to have its vaccine approved for children 6 months to 5 years old. A hearing is scheduled for February 15.

Los Angeles County is the second largest school district in the nation, with over 600,000 students.

February 08, 1:53 p.m.
Daily cases below 300,000 for the first time this year

The U.S. case rate is down, down 63.4% since the peak three weeks ago, according to federal data.

For the first time since December, daily cases in the United States are below 300,000.

However, experts continue to warn that the United States is not off the hook. Case levels remain much higher than the country’s previous surges, and the United States is still reporting millions of new cases every week. Experts also point out that many Americans who take home tests do not submit their results and therefore the total number of cases may be higher than reported.

On average, about 13,000 Americans with COVID-19 are admitted to hospital each day — a drop of 26.4% in the past week, according to federal data.

Emergency room visits with diagnosed cases of COVID-19 are also down, down nearly 60% in the past month, according to federal data.

The U.S. mortality average is at a plateau, with the country reporting about 2,300 new COVID-19-related deaths every day, according to federal data. This average is significantly lower than last winter, when the country peaked at around 3,400 deaths per day.

ABC News’ Arielle Mitropoulos

February 08, 11:28 a.m.
Omicron is estimated at 96.4% of new cases

The presence of the omicron subvariant, BA.2, is increasing in the United States, according to new data released by the CDC.

BA.2 is estimated to account for 3.6% of new COVID-19 cases in the United States as of February 5. BA.2 is expected to represent 1.2% of new cases the previous week.

The original omicron strain, B.1.1.529, still makes up the vast majority of new cases, accounting for about 96.4% of cases in the United States.

There are still many unknowns about the BA.2 variant, but currently it does not appear to demonstrate more severe disease. There is also no indication that BA.2 will have any further impact on vaccine efficacy.

The delta variant, which accounted for 99.2% of all new cases just two months ago, is now estimated at 0% of new cases.

ABC News’ Arielle Mitropoulos, Eric M. Strauss

Copyright © 2022, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

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Radio Station WHMI 93.5 FM – News, Weather, Traffic, Sports, School Updates and the Best Classic Hits from Livingston County Michigan https://colinmarshallradio.com/radio-station-whmi-93-5-fm-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hits-from-livingston-county-michigan-3/ Mon, 07 Feb 2022 17:42:42 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/radio-station-whmi-93-5-fm-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hits-from-livingston-county-michigan-3/ Luis Alvarez/Getty Images (NEW YORK) — As the COVID-19 pandemic has swept the world, more than 5.7 million people have died from the disease worldwide, including more than 904,000 Americans, according to compiled real-time data. by the Center for Systems Science and Systems at Johns Hopkins University. Engineering. About 64.1% of the population in the […]]]>
Luis Alvarez/Getty Images

(NEW YORK) — As the COVID-19 pandemic has swept the world, more than 5.7 million people have died from the disease worldwide, including more than 904,000 Americans, according to compiled real-time data. by the Center for Systems Science and Systems at Johns Hopkins University. Engineering.

About 64.1% of the population in the United States is fully vaccinated against COVID-19, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Latest titles:
-Connecticut to end statewide school mask mandate
-New Jersey governor to end mask mandate for schools
-All states reporting declining or stable new case rates

Here’s how the news evolves. All times Eastern.

February 07, 4:56 p.m.
Cases in children continue to drop but are still ‘extremely high’

After the United States reported an unprecedented number of new pediatric COVID-19 infections last month, updated data released Monday shows new cases among children have fallen for the second consecutive week.

Nearly 632,000 children tested positive for COVID-19 last week, a huge drop from the record high of 1,150,000 reported the week ending Jan. 20, according to a new report from the American Academy of Pediatrics and of the Children’s Hospital Association.

However, the organizations warn that pediatric cases remain “extremely high” and are still double the level seen during the Delta’s summer surge.

The AAP and CHA noted that there is an “urgent” need to collect more age-specific data to assess disease severity related to new variants as well as potential longer-term effects.

ABC News’ Arielle Mitropoulos

February 07, 4:34 p.m.
Connecticut to end statewide school mask mandate

Connecticut Gov. Ned Lamont announced on Monday that he recommends ending the statewide mask mandate beginning Feb. 28.

Starting in March, the decision on masks in schools will rest with superintendents and mayors based on individual cities’ needs, he said.

It comes hours after New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy said his requirement to wear face masks in schools would end on March 7.

The CDC said it continues to recommend masks for all students 2 and older, regardless of their vaccination status.

February 07, 2:50 p.m.
The White House has contracted 569 million free tests so far

President Joe Biden’s administration has so far contracted for about 569 million rapid home tests as it works to fulfill Biden’s pledge for 1 billion free tests nationwide, has a White House official told ABC News.

According to an ABC News analysis, testing company iHealth is supplying the government with the most tests to meet this goal, with a contract to supply 354 million tests. Roche, Abbott and Siemens are other companies providing testing.

White House officials said about 60 million households have placed test orders so far, for a total of 240 million tests (each household can order four).

The U.S. Postal Service said on Friday it had mailed tests to “tens of millions” of those households.

ABC News’ Cheyenne Haslett, Ben Gittleson, Lucien Bruggeman

February 07, 11:54 a.m.
New Jersey governor to end mask mandate for schools

New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy announced on Monday that the state’s requirement to wear face masks in schools will end on March 7.

“Balancing public health with returning to some semblance of normalcy isn’t easy. But we can take this step responsibly due to declining COVID numbers and growth in vaccinations,” Murphy tweeted.

Murphy, a Democrat, has imposed some of the toughest pandemic-related mandates in the country. New Jersey, an early hotspot for COVID-19 cases, has lost more than 31,000 residents to the virus.

The move follows a move last month by Pennsylvania Governor Tom Wolf, also a Democrat, to rescind his state’s mask mandate for schools.

Meanwhile, Democratic governors in New York and Connecticut have said they are reassessing school mask mandates set to expire later this month.

ABC News’ Aaron Katersky

Copyright © 2022, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

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Monona, 12, hosts a community radio show https://colinmarshallradio.com/monona-12-hosts-a-community-radio-show/ Fri, 28 Jan 2022 22:00:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/monona-12-hosts-a-community-radio-show/ MONONA, Wis. (WMTV) – Beatrix Pauli has a different hobby than most of her friends. The 12-year-old spends her free time working on her radio show, Bea’s Buzz. “I guess it’s really fun,” Pauli said. She first contacted the staff of 98.7 WVMO to see how she could get involved in the media. Will Nimmow, […]]]>

MONONA, Wis. (WMTV) – Beatrix Pauli has a different hobby than most of her friends. The 12-year-old spends her free time working on her radio show, Bea’s Buzz.

“I guess it’s really fun,” Pauli said.

She first contacted the staff of 98.7 WVMO to see how she could get involved in the media.

Will Nimmow, the director of community media, says she came over one day and practiced reading a few lines.

“She hit it off straight away,” Nimmow said. “She was comfortable and she was friendly.”

From there, they invited Bea to read the occasional public service announcements that aired on air.

“We just knew she was natural,” he said. “She comes when she wants.

Soon, WVMO asked Bea if she would be interested in hosting her own show.

“At first we thought they were joking and they were like, ‘No, we’re serious.'” Pauli recalled.

Since last April, Bea has hosted 14 episodes of Bea’s Buzz and has interviewed a number of guests, including National Geographic’s Dr. Rae Wynn-Grant and NBC’s The Voice’s Raine Stern.

“I’m a people person, so I like interviewing people and being interviewed,” Pauli said. “I think I learned a lot from that.”

Nimmow says Pauli took the opportunity and ran with it.

“It’s very inspiring to see someone so young understand and appreciate the resources she has and can use,” Nimmow said.

Pauli says she is considering a career in broadcast journalism.

“I thought about it, but I haven’t really decided if that’s what I want to do when I grow up,” Pauli said. “It’s really fun to get out into the community and meet new people.”

You can listen to it every first Thursday of the month at 12 p.m. and 3 p.m. on 98.7 or on her website.

Copyright 2022 WMTV. All rights reserved.

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Ulvaeus searches for the source of the ABBA magic with the Apple radio show | ap-entertainment https://colinmarshallradio.com/ulvaeus-searches-for-the-source-of-the-abba-magic-with-the-apple-radio-show-ap-entertainment/ Fri, 28 Jan 2022 18:44:33 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/ulvaeus-searches-for-the-source-of-the-abba-magic-with-the-apple-radio-show-ap-entertainment/ LOS ANGELES (AP) — ABBA’s Björn Ulvaeus is launching a radio show on Apple Music, hoping to figure out why his songs like “Mamma Mia” and “Dancing Queen” have stuck in the minds of such a big fan. part of the world for so long several decades. The Swedish supergroup guitarist, vocalist and co-songwriter will […]]]>

LOS ANGELES (AP) — ABBA’s Björn Ulvaeus is launching a radio show on Apple Music, hoping to figure out why his songs like “Mamma Mia” and “Dancing Queen” have stuck in the minds of such a big fan. part of the world for so long several decades.

The Swedish supergroup guitarist, vocalist and co-songwriter will host the “Björn from ABBA and Friends’ Radio Show” on Apple Music Hits starting Monday.

The limited series includes music and conversations with Ulvaeus’ friends and collaborators, starting with the first episode with fellow producer, songwriter and Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Nile Rodgers.

Ulvaeus and Rodgers talk about the secrets of creating hits and why ABBA’s music has stuck in the public consciousness.

“I’ve long wanted to ask emotionally intelligent and intellectual people who know ABBA why they think our songs have lasted so long – almost 40 years – because I don’t understand it myself,” the 76-said Ulvaeus, a year.

The show comes in the middle a major revival of ABBA. Ulvaeus and bandmates Agnetha Fältskog, Anni-Frid Lyngstad and Benny Andersson released their first new music together in four decades in November on the album “Voyager.” And in May, a series of live holographic shows are set to begin, created by George Lucas’ band and special effects company, Industrial Light & Magic.

Ulvaeus’ other guests on the radio show include Catherine Johnson, the British playwright who wrote the play “Mamma Mia!” and the script for the next film.

Johan Renck, the creative director of the upcoming concerts, guest on another episode, all of which will air at 3:00 p.m. Eastern this week and can be streamed afterward.

Ulvaeus is the latest of many music stars to host a show on the service. Others include Elton John, The Weeknd, J Balvin and Shania Twain.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

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Radio Station WHMI 93.5 FM – News, Weather, Traffic, Sports, School Updates and the Best Classic Hits from Livingston County Michigan https://colinmarshallradio.com/radio-station-whmi-93-5-fm-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hits-from-livingston-county-michigan-2/ Fri, 28 Jan 2022 12:29:08 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/radio-station-whmi-93-5-fm-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hits-from-livingston-county-michigan-2/ (WASHINGTON) — The U.S. Supreme Court will once again revisit the legality of affirmative action in higher education, after last upholding decades-old precedent in 2016. On Monday, the High Court said it would take up a pair of cases challenging the use of race as a factor in undergraduate admissions at Harvard University, the nation’s […]]]>

(WASHINGTON) — The U.S. Supreme Court will once again revisit the legality of affirmative action in higher education, after last upholding decades-old precedent in 2016.

On Monday, the High Court said it would take up a pair of cases challenging the use of race as a factor in undergraduate admissions at Harvard University, the nation’s oldest private college, and at the University of North Carolina, the nation’s oldest public state university. .

The fact that the Supreme Court has agreed to hear the cases together is seen by some experts as an indication that the conservative-leaning body may be willing to review its precedents and end race-conscious admissions in education. higher – which proponents say will have wide-ranging implications for schools and beyond.

Some studies suggest that policies—which consider race as one of many factors when considering applicants to foster diversity in the student body—have had a profound effect on opportunities for minority applicants, which in turn has an impact on their chances of employment and career. And they suggest stopping them not only decreases the number of black and Latino students enrolling in colleges, but increases those of advantaged groups.

“This is a very, very significant threat to the continued constitutionality of affirmative action,” Tanya Washington, a law professor at Georgia State University whose research focuses on educational equity, told ABC News. .

Opponents — including the conservative group Students for Fair Admissions, which brought both lawsuits against the universities — have argued that the policies are discriminatory and violate students’ civil rights and the constitutional guarantee of equal protection.

Since 1978, the court has said race can be used as one factor among others in college admissions, prohibiting the use of quotas or mathematical formulas to diversify a class.

In the landmark 2003 case Grutter v. Bollinger, which the cases against Harvard and UNC seek to overturn, the court said the goal of a diverse student body justifies the use of race, as well as other factors, in admissions policies.

The court raised the bar for schools with its 2013 decision in the case of Abigail Fisher, a white woman who tried to end consideration of race in university admissions policies from Texas. In the majority view, former Justice Anthony Kennedy said institutions must first exhaust all racially neutral means to achieve racial diversity, such as recruitment and socio-economic indicators, before to consider race, Washington said.

The court last upheld affirmative action in 2016 when it considered Fisher’s case again, in a close vote that many expected at the time to upend gender-conscious admissions policies. race.

Since that ruling, the composition of the tribunal has changed in a way that suggests precedent could be overturned, according to Washington.

“The court moved to a more conservative block of judges — 6 to 3 — and I think there would be significant receptivity among that group of six to overturning Grutter v. Bollinger,” Washington said. , noting that the breakup is unlikely. change with the retirement of Justice Stephen Breyer.

With this latest case, the court could rule in a number of ways, according to Washington. It could say that using race in admissions violates the 14th Amendment’s Equal Protection Clause and overthrows Grutter, ending affirmative action. He could support Grutter and conclude that the use of race in admissions policies at Harvard and UNC was constitutional. Or he could support Grutter but find the use of race in these contexts unconstitutional.

The court could also potentially further restrict the practice or require “higher standards” for schools to use it, said Michael Olivas, holder of the William B. Bates Emeritus Professor of Law at the University of Houston Law Center, at ABC News.

The consolidation of the two cases signals to Washington that “a majority of the court may be prepared to overrule Grutter.” The fact that the court also seemed inclined to overturn another long-standing precedent in Roe v. Wade could also be pointing to the same thing here, she said.

Against the wisdom of convention at the time, Olivas said the court would uphold affirmative action in the 2016 case. He said he believed the same now, even with a different court composition.

“The world has changed, but the common law has not changed,” he said. “I hope 50 years of very clear law would hold.”
“Cataclysmic” impact

If the court ends affirmative action in higher education, the impact will be far-reaching, Washington said, because most institutions — except those in several states where it is banned from public universities — use race-conscious admissions policies.

“It won’t just impact the elite,” Washington said. “What we’re going to see, what I predict, is a cataclysmic drop in the number of Latino, Black, and Indigenous students attending institutions of higher education.”

A 2015 study published in the Journal of Higher Education that examined the impact of affirmative action bans in six states found that the share of students of color in medical schools fell after the bans took effect. .

In California, which has banned affirmative action policies at public universities in the state since 1996, education advocacy group EdSource found that there was a double-digit enrollment gap between the percentage of Latino high school graduates and those enrolled in the University of California’s 2019 freshman class. .

If Harvard were to stop considering race in its admissions process and use only race-neutral factors, the proportion of African-American students admitted to the Class of 2019 would likely have dropped from 14% to 6%. , and the proportion of Hispanic or “other” students from 14% to 9%, found a university committee. Meanwhile, “this decrease would produce a corresponding increase in the number of students of other races, primarily white students,” its report said.

Disparities in admissions have implications for those entering professional fields, such as law or medicine, as well as college professors, Washington said.

“I think it will make the quality of education less robust and less rigorous,” she said. “I think this will mean that we will also end up with fewer teachers and professionals of various races. This will have detrimental and far-reaching consequences for our society.”

For Olivas, one of the worst consequences of the potential end of affirmative action is the message it sends.

“I think this will send a signal to minority parents that their children are not wanted,” he said. “I think that would be a mistake for all of us. I want a better educated group no matter where they come from.”

Whether affirmative action is maintained or not, disparities in admissions would still exist thanks to policies such as inherited admissions, which tend to disproportionately benefit white applicants, he added.

In the case against Harvard, Students for Fair Admissions alleges that Asian American applicants were unlawfully targeted and rejected at a disproportionately higher rate, in violation of students’ constitutional rights. In the case against UNC, he alleges that the university has refused to use racially neutral alternatives to achieve the stated goal of a diverse study body.

“Every college applicant should be judged as a unique individual, not as a representative of a racial or ethnic group,” said Edward Blum, president of Students for Fair Admissions and longtime opponent of affirmative action. and conservative activist, in a statement. .

In its lawsuit against Harvard, Students for Fair Admissions also argued that racial classifications “have a stigmatizing effect” on applicants.

“Regardless of whether an African-American or Hispanic applicant is admitted to Harvard because of racial preference, so long as racial preferences exist, it will often be assumed that race is the reason for the applicant’s admission to Harvard. school,” the complaint said. . “This stigma can have a devastating effect on the psyche of impressionable students.”

In response to the Supreme Court’s ruling this week, Harvard and UNC said their admissions policies were ruled constitutional by lower courts.

“Considering race as one factor among many in admissions decisions produces a more diverse student body that strengthens the learning environment for all,” Harvard President Lawrence Bacow said in a statement.

UNC spokesperson Beth Keith said in a statement that its holistic admissions process “allows for a deliberate and thoughtful evaluation of each student.”

Many experts, including Washington, expect the Supreme Court to hear arguments in the case during its next term, which begins in October.

Copyright © 2022, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

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Radio Station WHMI 93.5 FM – News, Weather, Traffic, Sports, School Updates and the Best Classic Hits from Livingston County Michigan https://colinmarshallradio.com/radio-station-whmi-93-5-fm-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hits-from-livingston-county-michigan/ Wed, 26 Jan 2022 23:02:26 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/radio-station-whmi-93-5-fm-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hits-from-livingston-county-michigan/ Go Nakamura/Getty Images (NEW YORK) — As the COVID-19 pandemic has swept the world, more than 5.6 million people have died from the disease worldwide, including more than 872,000 Americans, according to compiled real-time data. by the Center for Systems Science and Systems at Johns Hopkins University. Engineering. About 63.5% of the population in the […]]]>
Go Nakamura/Getty Images

(NEW YORK) — As the COVID-19 pandemic has swept the world, more than 5.6 million people have died from the disease worldwide, including more than 872,000 Americans, according to compiled real-time data. by the Center for Systems Science and Systems at Johns Hopkins University. Engineering.

About 63.5% of the population in the United States is fully vaccinated against COVID-19, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Here’s how the news evolves. All times Eastern:

January 26, 6:36 p.m.
1st participant to receive Moderna’s omicron-specific vaccine

Moderna announced Wednesday that the first participant has been dosed in the Phase 2 study of its omicron-specific booster candidate, in case it becomes necessary.

The Moderna trials will include people who received two doses of the original Moderna vaccine and people who received two doses of the original Moderna vaccine and a Moderna booster shot.

Pfizer announced on Tuesday that it has launched clinical studies to evaluate an omicron-based vaccine for adults.

January 26, 5 p.m.
NIH trial finds mixing and matching boosters safe and effective

A National Institutes of Health study published in the New England Journal of Medicine found that mix-and-match boosters are safe and create an immune response similar to sticking with your initial vaccine.

An earlier version of this study, with more preliminary results, helped guide the CDC’s decision to allow mix-and-match.

The study authors do not claim that specific combinations are more or less effective. The study found that people who received an mRNA vaccine (Pfizer or Moderna) and then received the Johnson & Johnson booster had a significant increase in T-cell response, part of immunity.

The trial involved 458 participants who received a vaccine without prior COVID-19 infection. This data relates only to the first 29 days following receipt of the reminder; the researchers plan to follow the participants for a year, which will provide more data.

– ABC News’ Vanya Jain, Sony Salzman, Eric Strauss, Dr. Alexis Carrington

January 26, 4:47 p.m.
Unvaccinated child dies in Mississippi

An unvaccinated child has died in Mississippi of COVID-19, according to the state health department.

The department confirmed to ABC News that the child was between 11 and 17 years old, an eligible age range to receive Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine.

This was the 10th child – including an infant – to die in Mississippi from COVID-19. None of the 10 children have been vaccinated, according to the health department.

-Josh Hoyos of ABC News

January 26, 10:40 a.m.
US hospital admissions set to fall for first time in months

Hospital admissions related to COVID-19 in the United States are expected to fall in the coming weeks, the first time the country has seen a drop in months, according to forecasting models used by the CDC.

Estimates suggest that between 4,900 and 27,800 Americans could be admitted to hospital each day by February 18.

Deaths from COVID-19 are expected to remain stable or have an uncertain trend. Estimates suggest about 33,000 more Americans could die from COVID-19 over the next two weeks.

– ABC News’ Arielle Mitropoulos

January 25, 6:06 p.m.
All Super Bowl attendees will receive a KN95 mask

Every attendee at next month’s Super Bowl in Los Angeles will receive a KN95 mask, health officials announced Tuesday.

Additionally, “members of the safety team” will remind fans to keep their masks on unless they’re eating or drinking, Los Angeles County Public Health Director Barbara Ferrer said during the interview. a meeting of the county board of supervisors.

Super Bowl Experience attendees will also receive a free at-home rapid test kit, Ferrer said, with messages to test ahead of the big game on Feb. 13 at SoFi Stadium.

The county plans to distribute more than 60,000 take-out kits at the Super Bowl Experience, which will be held at the Los Angeles Convention Center from February 5-12.

-Jennifer Watts of ABC News

Copyright © 2022, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

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WHMI 93.5 FM radio station – Livingston County Michigan News, weather, traffic, sports, school updates and the best classic hit https://colinmarshallradio.com/whmi-93-5-fm-radio-station-livingston-county-michigan-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hit-14/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 21:42:44 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/whmi-93-5-fm-radio-station-livingston-county-michigan-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hit-14/ Christopher Dilts / Bloomberg via Getty Images (CHICAGO) – More than 350,000 Chicago public school students are expected to resume in-person learning on Wednesday after a tentative agreement was reached between the school district and the Chicago Teachers Union to strengthen classroom safety amid ‘a wave of COVID-19 infections. A deal was struck Monday night […]]]>
Christopher Dilts / Bloomberg via Getty Images

(CHICAGO) – More than 350,000 Chicago public school students are expected to resume in-person learning on Wednesday after a tentative agreement was reached between the school district and the Chicago Teachers Union to strengthen classroom safety amid ‘a wave of COVID-19 infections.

A deal was struck Monday night to end nearly a week of classroom and distance learning cancellations. Tuesday marked the fifth day that students left classrooms after a long vacation break.

The more than 25,000 teachers and staff in the country’s third largest school district are due to return to their schools on Tuesday to prepare for the reopening of classrooms.

Negotiations between the CTU and the district focused on demands to expand student testing for the virus and create a package of measures designed to trigger school closures and the return of distance learning if coronavirus infections continue to skyrocket. The talks have at times become controversial, with union leaders accusing Mayor Lori Lightfoot of “intimidating” teachers in classrooms and school district officials accusing the union of organizing an “illegal walkout”.

The two sides filed complaints with a state labor commission.

“Some will ask who won and who lost,” Lightfoot said Monday night. “No one wins when our students are not where they can learn best and where they are safest. After leaving school for four consecutive days, I am sure many students will be delighted to come back to school. the classroom with their teachers and peers. And their parents and guardians can now breathe a much needed sigh of relief. “

Pedro Martinez, CEO of Chicago Public Schools, said the district was committed to keeping its students, teachers and staff safe, and said the negotiations forged “some very good things.”

CTU President Jesse Sharkey said on Monday the union had fought to improve classroom safety for students and teachers.

“I’m finally proud that the Chicago Teachers Union has taken a stand,” Sharkey said at a press conference. “We’re going to continue to do what’s right as we navigate this area. It’s not a perfect deal but we’ll hold our heads up high because it was hard to come by.”

The agreement also includes new incentives to increase the number of substitute teachers in the district and establishes measures that will incentivize a return to distance learning, but for individual schools, not for protocols at scale. district requested by the CTU.

The district also offered to spend around $ 100 million to implement a safety plan that includes air purifiers for all classrooms. The district said it will provide KN95 masks to all teachers and students.

The union’s governing body, made up of 700 members, voted by a margin of almost 2 to 1 – 63% to 27% – to end distance education. Base members have until later this week to vote on whether to ratify the deal.

Like Chicago, school districts across the country are reeling from an increase in COVID-19 cases triggered by the highly contagious variant of omicron.

The Los Angeles Unified School District plans to reopen schools for in-person learning on Tuesday, although some schools in the nation’s second-largest school district have chosen to delay reopening due to an increase in reported cases of COVID- 19.

LAUSD officials are demanding that all students and staff be tested for COVID-19 before the first day of class. The district said Monday that at least 65,630 of those tests came back positive.

The Philadelphia School District announced Friday that 46 schools will switch to virtual learning as the omicron variant and a winter storm took its toll on staff.

Copyright © 2022, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

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