social media – Colin Marshall Radio http://colinmarshallradio.com/ Fri, 25 Mar 2022 14:19:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://colinmarshallradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-1-1-120x120.png social media – Colin Marshall Radio http://colinmarshallradio.com/ 32 32 Announcers fired by Maine radio station for shaming female basketball players without being aware of open mic https://colinmarshallradio.com/announcers-fired-by-maine-radio-station-for-shaming-female-basketball-players-without-being-aware-of-open-mic/ Mon, 24 Jan 2022 18:57:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/announcers-fired-by-maine-radio-station-for-shaming-female-basketball-players-without-being-aware-of-open-mic/ Derogatory comments made about players’ weight during a radio station’s live broadcast of a women’s basketball game sparked outrage and resulted in the firing of two Maine broadcasters, according to reports. According to a report by the Bangor Daily News, the radio station in Houlton, Maine, has fired Jim Carter of Près Isle and Steve […]]]>

Derogatory comments made about players’ weight during a radio station’s live broadcast of a women’s basketball game sparked outrage and resulted in the firing of two Maine broadcasters, according to reports.

According to a report by the Bangor Daily News, the radio station in Houlton, Maine, has fired Jim Carter of Près Isle and Steve Shaw of Mars Hill, both Hall of Fame inductees.

As they prepared to call a women’s basketball game, the pair watched a separate women’s game between Easton and Central Aroostook on a monitor. Unaware of the existence of an open microphone, they made remarks about the weight and physical appearance of some players, the Bangor Daily News reported.

The Portland Press Herald reported that WHOU-FM owner Fred Grant fired Carter, a former coach, and Shaw, a former athletic director after they ended their broadcast of the high school basketball game in Caribou on Thursday night. Shaw and Carter had been streaming games for WHOU for about a month, Grant said.

According to the Press Herald, the pair’s derogatory comments about some players’ weight can be heard in a 40-second video posted to Twitter. With one of the broadcasters saying, “two girls here extremely overweight. Awful.” Other derogatory comments were followed by laughter.

“I started getting phone calls immediately,” Grant told the Press Herald by phone Friday morning.

Outrage also erupted on social media. The Press Herald quoted a commenter’s post on WHOU’s Facebook page, which read: “I must say I have never heard anything so unprofessional as what Jim Carter and Steve Shaw said about of a few players tonight, you should both be ashamed of yourselves and retire from high school basketball.

Grant received praise from other commenters on the station’s Facebook page for quickly firing advertisers, the Press Herald quoted.

“Thank you for doing the right thing,” one wrote. “There was no need for these on-air or off-line commentaries. The kids have enough to deal with.

USA Today reported that Grant released a public statement the next morning explaining that broadcasters Steve Shaw and Jim Carter had been fired.

Less than a week after the incident, News Center Maine reported that Shaw had retired from the Maine Basketball Hall of Fame, to which he was inducted as a “2020 Legend of the Game”. The Maine Basketball Hall of Fame accepted his withdrawal.

The Press Herald reached Carter by phone Friday afternoon. Carter expressed remorse for the incident but declined to go into specifics, saying he apologized to the school superintendent whose players he belittled.

“I don’t even know what to say. I hope everyone can get through this and be okay with it,” Carter told the Press Herald.

The Press Herald said his attempts to reach Shaw for an interview on Friday had failed.

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An “afrominimalist” author explains why it is better to live with less https://colinmarshallradio.com/an-afrominimalist-author-explains-why-it-is-better-to-live-with-less/ Sat, 22 Jan 2022 22:17:35 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/an-afrominimalist-author-explains-why-it-is-better-to-live-with-less/ Copyright 2022 NPR. To learn more, visit https://www.npr.org. MICHEL MARTIN, HOST: And finally today, maybe like many of us, you started the New Year with the goal of finally getting organized, maybe decluttering that kitchen cupboard and drawers. There’s no shortage of books, social media accounts, and TV shows to help you out. But maybe […]]]>
Copyright 2022 NPR. To learn more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And finally today, maybe like many of us, you started the New Year with the goal of finally getting organized, maybe decluttering that kitchen cupboard and drawers. There’s no shortage of books, social media accounts, and TV shows to help you out. But maybe you feel a little overwhelmed, like you don’t know where to start. Or maybe you feel like a lot of people talking about it don’t really talk to you.

Enter Christine Platt. She is called the Afrominimalist and she is the author of the book “The Afrominimalist’s Guide to Living on Less”. Her work aims to get everyone, but especially people of color, to live with less by breaking down how race and racism shape ideas about property, wealth and what is worth keeping. When we spoke, I asked Platt to describe his philosophy.

CHRISTINE PLATT: Afrominimalism is simply my way of defining my minimalist practice, which is influenced by the history and beauty of the African diaspora. But I really wanted to write a book that explained the psychology of ownership – okay – so that we understand our motivations. For example, why are we motivated to have certain things? I wanted to write a book that really focused on understanding our attachments. Why is it so hard to let go of things we no longer need, use, or love? And, you know, I also wanted to write a book that offers a more holistic approach accessible to everyone.

MARTIN: It goes without saying, I guess I shouldn’t have to say it, that people of all races love things, but prosperity and luxury manifest themselves in certain ways in black culture. I’m thinking hip hop. I think about how wealthy athletes, I think about how, you know, wealthy artists have kind of trained us to look at things as a marker of success. I mean, how many fancy cars have appeared in music videos, how many furs, how many super diamonds? How do you talk about it in a way that doesn’t make people feel like you’re judging them for it?

PLATT: I think we, you know, we have to own that. And then once we have it, you know, we use that information to become aware, to create empathy. And, you know, for black people and for other marginalized groups, it’s often the missing link in how and why we consume the way we do. And, you know, it’s empowering once we own it, isn’t it? And that’s why I dedicated the book to our ancestors, right? I say living on less is now our choice because property is just a complicated issue for people in the African Diaspora, right? I mean, as a black woman, when I think about property, I have to consider my ancestry. I have to consider the historical and generational inequalities of slavery, Jim Crow, redlining, you know, and other state-sanctioned property limitations and their lasting implications. Our family and collective histories are just a big part and continue to influence how and why we consume.

MARTIN: I mean, I think about the pressure to be perfect all the time, don’t I? I think of the pressure on our kind of movie stars or celebrities or even just regular people to be perfectly dressed all the time, even to the edges of your hair, right? To the right? For people who don’t know what it is, check it out. Like, I think of a young woman I know who was planning her wedding with her longtime love, and she and her fiancé owned a house together and were good, you know, good savers and had kind of been really intentional on their lifestyle.

But when it came to the wedding, there was a lot of pressure from both sides to hit the jackpot with the bespoke dresses and the horse-drawn chariot or like Bentley. And I said to him, why you – why? And she said, well, because none of their families could ever have that. And so you can see the strong emotional push to live that way, right?

PLATT: Yeah. I believe that forgiveness is an essential step in acknowledging and understanding our overuse because for many marginalized people, that forgiveness often needs to include and extend to our caregivers and communities, right? We have to give thanks to the people who helped lift us up – right? – and understanding that so many of them were doing their best under the circumstances, you know, whether it was due to lack of education, lack of resources, you know, lack of guidance. So many of our choices and behaviors are reflections and remnants of what our ancestors had to do to survive.

And, you know, today, a lot of these learned behaviors from our ancestors and their guidance, you know, like living, you know, living for the moment – ​​right? – because tomorrow is not promised and all those things, right? They continue to influence our relationship with money and impact our opportunities to build generational wealth, which is why I believe we need to continuously work to dismantle many cultural beliefs that simply no longer exist. applicable and beneficial to us individually and collectively.

MARTIN: So that logically leads to helping people listening to our conversation say, OK, OK, I want to – I’m inspired now. I want to get organized like now, but where do I start?

PLATT: I really do offer a four-step holistic approach, which you can get for free (laughs) on my social media, which is, you know, the first step is to recognize that you have too much, right? not ? And the second step is again this important aspect of forgiveness. And the third step is to let go. And the fourth step is to pay it forward, you know, to be very intentional with these things that no longer serve us so that they don’t just end up in landfills and they end up with people, you know, or organizations who can really benefit from their use.

MARTIN: For people who started at the beginning of the year and then lost hope, you know, a few weeks into the new year it seemed like too much, is there anything they can to recommit to the cause?

PLATT: I have a challenge that I host on Instagram, which is really about giving up one thing a day, like, going for at least one thing a day, right? I mean, you don’t have to go, you know, that weekend warrior mission, do you? But I also feel like, you know, even taking a break – if you’ve lost a bit of steam, even taking a break and starting to do some of this self-discovery work, starting to do some of that inner work and understanding, why am I this way as a consumer? Why is it so hard for me to let go, right? The answers to these questions are what really make travel not only manageable and tolerable, but possible, you know. And so that would be my little encouragement for people.

MARTIN: It’s Christine Platt, author of the book “The Afrominimalist’s Guide to Living With Less”. Christine Platt, thank you very much for talking to us.

PLATT: Thank you very much for inviting me. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

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New community dance music radio station launched in North Wales https://colinmarshallradio.com/new-community-dance-music-radio-station-launched-in-north-wales/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 08:53:53 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/new-community-dance-music-radio-station-launched-in-north-wales/ A NEW community radio station focusing on a wide range of dance music has been set up in North Wales and is calling for more volunteers to get involved. ‘Drift Radio’ has been broadcasting since going live at 11.30pm on New Year’s Eve, with a staff of around 25 currently working at the station, which […]]]>

A NEW community radio station focusing on a wide range of dance music has been set up in North Wales and is calling for more volunteers to get involved.

‘Drift Radio’ has been broadcasting since going live at 11.30pm on New Year’s Eve, with a staff of around 25 currently working at the station, which operates as a non-profit organisation.

The station was created by Lee Openshaw, a 1990s commercial DJ who has worked in radio since 2018, ‘Pure Cold’, a music producer and tour manager for American rapper Fatman Scoop, and Kevin Allen, who has a long history in dance and house music and a top-notch computer background.

Lee said the station was created both to diversify residents’ listening options and for volunteers and listeners to hopefully feel the mental benefits he thinks music can provide.

Lee, from Colwyn Bay, said: “We are aware that there is a wide range of dance music out there, and there was nothing locally for those genres.

“We had also been motivated by the fact that music was something known to help with mental health.

“It’s well recognized that a lot of people in the music community have mental health issues. It is partly for this reason that I got involved in radio from 2018; it was something to look forward to.

“We were looking to start this niche, if you will, of community dance music radio, to provide outlets for people interested in music who want to show off what they can do.

“It deals with ‘commercial dance music’, but also dives into house, techno, trance; we are trying to attract as many people from the community to the project.

“We had people who, for example, could do drums and bass (shows) approached us. As people get involved, we might have that later.

Drift Radio’s current performance desk. Photo: Lee Openshaw

Although currently based in Betws-yn-Rhos, with most shows pre-recorded or done remotely, Lee hopes to have a “physical studio location” for Drift Radio soon, to make it even more accessible to more people. attendees.

The station is part of the community interest group Water Abode, which specializes in dance events and radio production in North Wales, and is currently managed via a virtual cloud server, which is managed by Kevin.

Lee, meanwhile, oversees much of the station’s content and has his own “Dance Classics” show on Tuesdays, while Pure Cold is primarily responsible for the marketing aspects of Drift Radio.

Lee added his joy at how well the first two weeks on the air went for the station, and hoped that with growing popularity would also come more volunteers.

He said: “Our base at the moment is Betws-yn-Rhos, but we are in the process of trying to secure a physical studio location so we can be more accessible to members of the public who want to get involved.

“It doesn’t matter if it’s people who want to play music, marketing or social media; and we will seek to provide opportunities for local businesses to sponsor the station or shows.

“At the moment you can find us on a number of different digital outlets including Radio Garden, TuneIn, Alexa, Google smart speakers or online.

“We had lots of encouraging comments and well wishes from some of our neighboring stations, such as Bayside Radio (in Colwyn Bay), which was really appreciated. So far it’s been really positive.

“There are a lot of people who are interested in what we do and there’s certainly a lot of appetite for the content, some of which you won’t hear anywhere else because it’s so specialized in presenting it.”

To learn more about Drift Radio, visit: www.drift.radio.

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Here’s what’s behind the Wordle craze https://colinmarshallradio.com/heres-whats-behind-the-wordle-craze/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 17:46:45 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/heres-whats-behind-the-wordle-craze/ Updated Jan 12, 2022 9:04 a.m. ET A simple pun is the most recent phenomenon in social media and pop culture: Wordle. The task is to guess a five-letter word. You have six tries. After each guess, the tiles change color to show which letters are not in the word (grey), which letters are in […]]]>

Updated Jan 12, 2022 9:04 a.m. ET

A simple pun is the most recent phenomenon in social media and pop culture: Wordle.

The task is to guess a five-letter word. You have six tries. After each guess, the tiles change color to show which letters are not in the word (grey), which letters are in the word but in the wrong position (yellow), and which are correctly in the word and in the correct position ( green ).

Some people can win in minutes. For some of us, it takes… longer.

Once you’re done, you can tweet how many guesses it took without spoiling the challenge for others. It’s the same word every day for everyone, and you can only play once a day.

The free game was created by software engineer Josh Wardle from New York, who created Wordle – a riff on his name – originally for his partner, Palak Shah, who is a fan of word games. Shah also helped with some of the development.

The app really started to pick up steam in October, and as of Monday it has more than 2.7 million players, Wardle told NPR. morning edition. And Wardle did it without ads or gimmicks. You don’t need to register with your email or give any personal information to play.

“In doing Wordle, I specifically rejected a bunch of stuff that you’re supposed to do for a mobile game,” Wardle told NPR. It deliberately did not include push notifications, allow users to play endlessly, or integrate other tools commonly used today to entice users to play apps for as long as possible.

Wardle said rejecting these engagement cheats might have fueled the game’s popularity after all – “where rejecting some of these things actually drew people to the game because it looks quite innocent and that he just wants you to have fun with it.”

However, the quick attention can be overwhelming.

“It’s going viral, it’s not great to be honest. I feel a sense of responsibility towards the players,” he said. The Guardian. “I feel like I really owe it to them to make things work and make sure everything is working properly.”

But Wardle said he particularly enjoyed the stories about how the game has helped people stay connected.

“They will have a family chat group where they will share their Wordle results with each other,” Wardle told NPR. “And especially during COVID, it’s a way for people to connect with friends and family that they might not otherwise be able to see, and it just provides this really easy way to connect with others.”

Strategy: vowels or consonants?

Facebook fan groups have now sprung up, while many articles and players’ offer their own strategic advice.

Using as many vowels as possible in the first guess is one tactic – “farewell” offers four. Another method is to try to use as many common consonants as possible with a word like “snort”.

The game uses common five-letter words as answers, Wardle told the Time, and it eliminated the possibility of very obscure words that no one would ever guess.

There is also a “hard mode”, where any yellow or green letter must be used in later guesses.

If you guess the word within six tries, the game gives you the opportunity to share your prowess on social media. The numbers in the tweet displayed here, as this reporter eventually found out, mean it was game #203 and I guessed the correct answer on three out of six attempts:

The simplicity, popularity and rarity of the game – with only one chance to play per day – offered copy a lot of opportunities develop their own versions, including with the ability to play unlimited games.

Of course, you can also take some time off after you’re done and try the NPR puzzle instead.


NPR’s Nell Clark contributed to this report.

Copyright 2022 NPR. To learn more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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WHMI 93.5 FM radio station – Livingston County Michigan News, weather, traffic, sports, school updates and the best classic hit https://colinmarshallradio.com/whmi-93-5-fm-radio-station-livingston-county-michigan-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hit-13/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 12:24:48 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/whmi-93-5-fm-radio-station-livingston-county-michigan-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hit-13/ JOSH EDELSON / AFP via Getty Images (NEW YORK) – As the COVID-19 pandemic swept the world, more than 5.4 million people have died from the disease worldwide, including more than 837,000 Americans, according to real-time data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Johns Hopkins University Engineering. In the United States, about 62.5% […]]]>
JOSH EDELSON / AFP via Getty Images

(NEW YORK) – As the COVID-19 pandemic swept the world, more than 5.4 million people have died from the disease worldwide, including more than 837,000 Americans, according to real-time data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Johns Hopkins University Engineering.

In the United States, about 62.5% of the population is fully vaccinated against COVID-19, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Here is how the news is evolving. Every hour in the East:

January 10, 9:21 a.m.
Uganda reopens schools, ending world’s longest shutdown

Uganda reopened its schools to students on Monday after nearly two years, ending the world’s longest school closure due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Schools in the East African country of 44 million people have been fully or partially closed since March 2020, when the pandemic began. The closures have affected more than 10 million learners, according to data from the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO).

Save the Children hailed the reopening of Ugandan schools, but warned that “the loss of learning could lead to high dropout rates in the coming weeks without urgent action.”

The London-based charity revealed in a report last November that up to one in five children in low-income countries, including Uganda, had dropped out of school due to rising poverty , child marriage and child labor, which have been exacerbated by the pandemic. . In a statement released on Monday, Save the Children warned of “a ‘second wave’ of dropouts as returning students who have fallen behind in their learning fear they will have no chance of catching up.”

To address the potential crisis in Uganda, Save the Children has launched “catch-up clubs”, which assess children and teach them to the required level to help them regain literacy and other learning, with support for child protection and cash assistance for families struggling to send them to school.

“As schools begin to reopen across the country, it is essential that all girls and boys have access to the support they need to successfully return to the classroom,” said Edison Nsubuga, education manager to Save the Children in Uganda, in a statement. Monday. “Many children have fallen behind in school due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Children who are behind in their learning are less likely to unleash their potential as adults. However, when children get the learning boost they need and have access to quality education, they can reach their full potential.

January 10, 6:37 a.m.
UK launches campaign urging pregnant women to get vaccinated and boost

The UK has launched a new advertising campaign urging pregnant women who have not yet received a COVID-19 vaccine or a vaccine booster to do so as soon as possible.

Testimonies from pregnant women who have had the injections will be broadcast in advertisements on UK radio stations and social media from Monday. New campaign urges pregnant women “not to wait to get vaccinated” and highlights risks of COVID-19 for mother and baby as well as benefits of getting vaccinated, according to UK ministry press release of Health and Social Protection.

The press release cites the latest data from the UK Health Safety Agency which suggests the COVID-19 vaccination is safe for pregnant women and provides strong protection against the virus for mother and baby. The press release also cited data from the UK Obstetric Surveillance System which shows that more than 96% of pregnant women hospitalized with symptoms of COVID-19 between May and October 2021 were not vaccinated, and a third of them needed breathing assistance. About one in five women hospitalized with COVID-19 must give birth preterm to help them recover, and one in five babies needs neonatal care.

“Getting vaccinated against COVID-19 is one of the most important things a pregnant woman can do this year to protect herself and her baby as much as possible from this virus”, Lucy Chappell, science advisor in head of the UK Department for Health and Social Affairs. Care, said in a statement Monday. “We now have a lot of evidence to show that vaccines are safe and that the risks posed by COVID-19 are much greater. “

January 10, 4:55 a.m.
Spain reports more COVID-19 re-infections in 2 weeks than the rest of the pandemic

Spain has reported more COVID-19 re-infections in a recent two-week period than it has reported during the rest of the pandemic, latest data from a Spanish health research institute shows public.

Data from the Carlos III Health Institute shows that there were 20,890 repeated infections reported in Spain from December 22, 2021 to January 5, 2022. This figure exceeds the 17,140 re-infections reported in the European country since the start of the pandemic in March 2020 to December 22, 2021. Data includes confirmed, probable and possible cases.

Alfredo Corell, professor of immunology at the Spanish University of Valladolid, told Spanish news site NIUS that the growing number of re-infections was due to the new, highly transmissible variant of omicron.

“Prior to this variant, re-infections were anecdotal globally,” Corell told NIUS. “Omicron has changed this paradigm.”

In southern Africa, where the variant was first identified in November, preliminary research suggests that omicron is three times more likely to cause re-infections than other known variants of the virus, including the highly contagious delta. However, the symptoms of re-infected individuals appear to be mild, according to Anne von Gottberg, a microbiologist at the South African National Institute of Communicable Diseases who studies omicron.

“A previous infection protected against Delta,” von Gottberg said during a press briefing on December 2. “But now, with Omicron, that doesn’t seem to be the case.”

Copyright © 2022, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

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WHMI 93.5 FM radio station – Livingston County Michigan News, weather, traffic, sports, school updates and the best classic hit https://colinmarshallradio.com/whmi-93-5-fm-radio-station-livingston-county-michigan-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hit-11/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 13:54:03 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/whmi-93-5-fm-radio-station-livingston-county-michigan-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hit-11/ [ad_1] Eric Lee / Bloomberg via Getty Images (NEW YORK) – As the COVID-19 pandemic swept the world, more than 5.4 million people have died from the disease worldwide, including more than 832,000 Americans, according to real-time data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Johns Hopkins University Engineering. In the United States, about […]]]>


[ad_1]

Eric Lee / Bloomberg via Getty Images

(NEW YORK) – As the COVID-19 pandemic swept the world, more than 5.4 million people have died from the disease worldwide, including more than 832,000 Americans, according to real-time data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Johns Hopkins University Engineering.

In the United States, about 62.3% of the population is fully vaccinated against COVID-19, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Here is how the news is evolving. Every hour in the East:

06 Jan 15:55
About 126,000 Americans hospitalized with COVID-19

An estimated 126,000 Americans are currently hospitalized with COVID-19, according to new data from the US Department of Health and Human Services.

Of these patients, about a sixth – or 21,000 – are in intensive care units.

The spread of the omicron variant is bringing the United States closer to the hospitalization record set last winter when 140,000 patients infected with the virus were hospitalized.

Meanwhile, the country records an average of 554,000 new cases of COVID-19 every day, five times more than a month ago, according to federal data.

Over the past week, the United States has reported an estimated 3.88 million infections with COVID-19, which on average represents about six Americans who test positive every second.

-Arielle Mitropoulos from ABC News

06 Jan 14:34
More than 800 LA firefighters and police officers tested positive

More than 800 Los Angeles Fire and Police Department personnel have tested positive for COVID-19, Mayor Eric Garcetti said Thursday.

Currently, 505 police officers and 299 firefighters are in quarantine after receiving positive results.

“These are big numbers. Figures that reflect the personnel issues we all face,” Garcetti said at a press conference outside a fire station.

He added that five out of six employees in the two departments are fully immunized, in line with the immunization mandate put in place for city employees.

Garcetti said that despite the number of officers and firefighters absent from work, the city is still protected.

“Both LAPD and LAFD have maintained the levels of personnel necessary to keep Angelenos safe, and we have maintained levels of personnel to make sure you, your family and our communities are safe,” he said. -he declares.

Jan 06, 12:33 pm
WHO says global cases rose 71% last week

Global cases of COVID-19 “have risen sharply,” the World Health Organization wrote in its weekly epidemiological update released Thursday.

Cases of the virus increased 71% in the week ending Jan. 2 from the previous week, meaning 9.5 million new COVID-19 infections have been reported globally, according to the ‘WHO.

The Americas saw the largest increase at 100%, followed by Southeast Asia at 78% and Europe at 63%.

The United States recorded the most cases of COVID-19 last week, followed by the United Kingdom, France, Spain and Italy.

The WHO added that there had been a 10% decrease in the number of new deaths from the previous week with more than 41,000 virus-related deaths recorded.

January 06, 11:17
1.3 million people in UK have long-standing COVID, data shows

It is estimated that 1.3 million people in the UK suffer from a lengthy COVID, according to new data released Thursday by the UK Office for National Statistics.

Long COVID is a condition in which patients who recover from the virus still show symptoms for weeks – even months or years – later.

The ONS said the figure, which is based on self-reported symptoms, equates to 2% of the population living with long-term COVID.

Fatigue was the most common symptom, reported by 51% of those surveyed. Other common symptoms included loss of smell (37%), shortness of breath (36%), and difficulty concentrating (28%).

About 64% said their long symptoms of COVID made it difficult for them to carry out their daily activities.

The longest COVID has been reported most often in people aged 35 to 69, women, people living in poorer areas or those working in health care or education, according to the ONS.

06 Jan 4:05 AM
American Medical Association criticizes new CDC guidelines

The American Medical Association, the nation’s largest medical association, criticized the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s new quarantine and isolation guidelines for COVID-19, saying the recommendations “risk spreading the virus further.” .

The CDC updated its guidelines on Dec. 27, saying asymptomatic people who test positive for COVID-19 should self-isolate for five days instead of 10.

“The American people should be able to count on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for timely, accurate and clear advice to protect themselves, their loved ones and their communities. Instead, the new quarantine and isolation recommendations aren’t just confusing, but risk spreading the virus further, ”American Medical Association President Dr. Gerald E. Harmon, in a statement.

Harmon referenced the data cited by the CDC in its rationale for shortening the isolation period, which estimates that 31% of people remain contagious five days after a positive COVID-19 test, suggesting that the data proves that thousands of Americans could resume their lives while being infected.

“With hundreds of thousands of new cases a day and more than a million positive cases reported on Jan. 3, tens of thousands – potentially hundreds of thousands – could return to work and school contagious. they’re following new CDC guidelines on ending isolation after five days without a negative test, “Harmon said.” Doctors are concerned that these recommendations put our patients at risk and could further overwhelm our healthcare system. “

Harmon said a negative COVID-19 test should be required to end isolation after a positive test, because re-entering society without knowing whether an individual is still positive ultimately risks further transmission of the virus.

While test availability remains a nationwide issue, Harmon also called on the Biden administration to increase test production and distribution, adding that “a shortage of tests at this time does not justify the omission. of a test requirement to get out of a now shortened isolation “.

-Arielle Mitropoulos from ABC News

06 Jan 03:16
Chicago cancels school for day 2

Chicago officials on Thursday canceled all public school classes amid classroom safety discussions with city teachers.

Classes were canceled on Wednesday after a majority of Chicago Teachers Union members voted in favor of distance learning amid an increase in COVID-19 cases. School officials called their action an illegal strike.

“In a time of crisis related to this pandemic, the worst thing we can do is give up science and data,” Mayor Lori E. Lightfoot said on Twitter. “If you care about our students and our families like we do, we won’t give in. We stand firm and fight to get our children back to learning in person.”

Teachers were excluded from their remote classrooms on Wednesday, according to the union. Union leaders asked members to try to log in again on Thursday, urging them to post photos on social media.

The union filed an unfair labor practice charge against the Chicago Board of Education on Wednesday.

“We have security rights and we’ve been at the negotiating table for 20 months to secure those rights,” union president Jesse Sharkey said in a statement.

Chicago’s public schools are among the largest in the country, with approximately 340,000 students in 636 schools.

06 Jan 02:43
TSA reports over 3,000 employee cases

The Transportation Security Administration reported 3,037 current COVID-19 infections on Wednesday.

The agency’s infections increased by about 16% in two days, according to data from the TSA.

The agency, which employs around 60,000 people, said it has accumulated 15,191 cases of COVID-19. The agency said 12,154 employees have recovered and 33 have died.

-Sam Sweeney of ABC News

Jan 05, 9:02 PM
CDC signs Pfizer boosters for 12-15 year olds

The director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has given children ages 12 to 15 the final green light to get Pfizer’s COVID-19 recall.

“It is essential that we protect our children and adolescents from infection with COVID-19 and complications of serious illness,” CDC director Rochelle Walensky said in a statement endorsing the recommendation of the CDC advisory committee. extend eligibility for recall.

The CDC recommends that teens between the ages of 12 and 17 receive a Pfizer booster five months after their second dose.

-Cheyenne Haslett from ABC News

Copyright © 2022, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

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Jazz and the graphic novel https://colinmarshallradio.com/jazz-and-the-graphic-novel/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 17:00:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/jazz-and-the-graphic-novel/ [ad_1] Writer and artist Dave Chisholm understands the skepticism. The term “graphic novel” conjures up images of crime-fighting superheroes or groups of social misfits making their way through a hostile world. Plus, says Chisholm, “So many representations of jazz music in the media are so wrong.” But Chisholm is uniquely qualified for this job. “My […]]]>


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Writer and artist Dave Chisholm understands the skepticism.

The term “graphic novel” conjures up images of crime-fighting superheroes or groups of social misfits making their way through a hostile world.

Plus, says Chisholm, “So many representations of jazz music in the media are so wrong.”

But Chisholm is uniquely qualified for this job.

“My earliest musical memories are of my father spinning Miles and Mingus on the turntable, and I have studied that music for most of my life,” Chisholm wrote in a recent social media post. “I went to college to study jazz composition and the trumpet, and I ended up getting my doctorate and have been playing professionally for about 25 years.”

“I also have this lifelong obsession with making comics, and my two longtime activities have now merged,” Chisholm continued.

Chisholm’s portfolio includes a science fiction series called “Canopus” and two other music-related books: Angèle.

Chisholm’s latest offering, “Enter the Blue”, is brought to you by Z2 Comics and Blue Note Records. It will be released on January 25 and will be available in multiple editions, from the $ 20 softcover to the $ 200 Super Deluxe version.

“This book is made by someone for whom this music means the world,” says Chisholm. “I put everything I have in this book.”

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Duran Duran singer Simon Le Bon’s radio program features cutting-edge new music https://colinmarshallradio.com/duran-duran-singer-simon-le-bons-radio-program-features-cutting-edge-new-music/ Mon, 20 Dec 2021 15:11:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/duran-duran-singer-simon-le-bons-radio-program-features-cutting-edge-new-music/ [ad_1] NEW YORK, NEW YORK – JULY 27: Duran Duran’s Simon Le Bon records his latest episode of WHOOOSH! with … [+] Katy Krassner at SiriusXM Studios on July 27, 2021 in New York City. (Photo by Cindy Ord / Getty Images for SiriusXM) Getty Images for SiriusXM Prior to the March 2020 pandemic containment, […]]]>


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Prior to the March 2020 pandemic containment, British rock band Duran Duran was in the process of complete work on their 15th studio album Future Past. When the world stopped, it caused the album’s release to be postponed for a year. During this long hiatus between studio work and touring, band members looked for other ways to stay in touch with audiences via the internet: bassist John Taylor made a bass tutorial and also chatted with his bandmate, keyboardist Nick Rhodes, on Instagram Live, while drummer Roger Taylor recorded a series of videos highlighting his desert islands discs.

For his part, the singer of Duran Duran, Simon Le Bon, took on an unexpected role: that of a deejay for his weekly music radio show. WOW!, who co-hosts with Katy Krassner, a longtime associate of the group. WOW! has been streaming on SiriusXM since January after it first launched as a podcast on DuranDuran.com over a year ago.

“It all started as a foreclosure affair,” Le Bon said in a Press statement. “I realized that the only music I was listening to was the music I was working on, and the stuff that got me into a band in the first place. So I lit my ears and went on a trip. on a sonic bunny. hole. What a revelation – there is so much new talent, so much music out there. Katy is the leaf that makes it all work. And that’s how a radio show was born. WOW!– it’s the sound of your mind expanding to embrace a new idea. “

“I’ve known him forever,” Krassner says of Le Bon, “and I’ve never seen him get so excited about something week after week. It’s really nice for both of us. He became a taste maker when maybe people thought of John or Nick that way and not necessarily him. Now people are talking about Simon that way, and the performers who are performed are tagging the show in social posts. It’s really gratifying for him.

Krassner remembers the conversation she had with Le Bon about starting a music podcast during the band’s time of inactivity. “He said, ‘Okay, do you want to do this with me? “We’re just going to talk and play a bunch of songs,” and I’m like, “Okay. We joked that the very first song we ever played was [America’s] “A Horse With No Name” was the first single Simon bought when he was a kid. It was as if the show was improvised. [We] put it on YouTube and it got a lot of reaction. We think, “Should we be doing this every week?” The group leadership was encouraging and then we started doing it every week.

Each episode of the show focuses on new music curated by Le Bon from emerging artists, while Krassner provides the backstory about them. Musicians include Twin Shadow, Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever, Mike Kota, deep tan, Matthew E. White, Sinead O’Brien and Japanese girl rock group CHAI who appeared on Future Past. “This is one of the groups that I personally discovered while preparing playlists for the radio show,” Le Bon said. News week last summer. “And me to like CHAI. I think they are so awesome.

Before America catches up with British indie band Wet Leg, WOW! was one of the first non-UK outlets to distribute the duo’s music. “I recently saw a friend’s 10 best singles of 2021 posted online and [Wet Leg’s] “Chaise Longue” was their number one song. I asked: “Did you hear this for the first time on WOW!? ‘ And she said, ‘Yes.’ I feel like we kind of highlighted them in a big way because Simon has talked about the song in so many episodes. I saw people I never thought I would listen to WOW! say, ‘Oh, I first heard this song on a Sirius show.’ We weren’t exactly verified, but I know they were talking about us. And so it was cool.

Part of what is so [exciting] about it, “says Krassner” and certainly more for Simon than for me, is that he hears all this great new music. I think he feels able to give back and say to these lesser-known artists, “I have a platform and I want to draw attention to your music.” For the most part, he doesn’t play in very well-followed groups. Of course, every now and then there’s like Tame Impala or a reggae band that has huge success on Instagram. But for the most part, most of the artists he plays don’t have a lot of followers. It’s really nice for them to be promoted by him.

On other occasions, the program has featured guests, including actress and Duran Duran fan Wendi McLendon-Covey (Bridesmaids, The Goldbergs). In addition to the music played on the program, a key element of WOW! was the spontaneous and spiritual split between Le Bon and Krassner. “A lot of people say to me, ‘Oh, you were born to do this,’ which is a nice compliment, ‘she said. “I couldn’t do it with just anyone. It is not my vocation and I did not study for it. Even though I spent many years as a publicist and then in social networks, it is not my forte. I could only really do that with someone like Simon, who I have that kind of brother-sister relationship with. We don’t really plan or script anything, so what you hear is just us speaking.

As of this writing, WOW! Now has over 80 episodes and has counted since its launch last year. Even in the midst of a busy schedule involving his band, Le Bon regularly taps episodes of shows every week. “I don’t know how that will change when the band goes on tour, to be honest,” says Krassner. “He seems pretty dedicated. Maybe our schedule will be two every two weeks rather than once a week because it’s going to get busy for him with the trips and especially when they shoot overseas, but we’ll see. We will try to continue as long as possible.

Krassner has officially worked with Duran Duran for over 25 years and oversees their social media presence as well as the popular Ask Katy Forum on the band’s website, where fans submit questions for band members to answer. Long before entering Duran Duran’s orbit on a professional level, Krassner, a New York native, grew up as a teenage fan of the band in the early 1980s and saw them play at the Nassau Coliseum at the loudest. from Duranmania. “I don’t know who wasn’t a Duran Duran fan,” she said. “When I was young I definitely had pictures on my wall of Adam Ant, Matt Dillon, Def Leppard, Duran Duran. I was in the right age group and caught up in their mania.

While Duran Duran rose to popularity in the mid-1990s with his hit song “Ordinary World”, Krassner joined the group’s management company, Left Bank in America. At that time, the group’s formation consisted of Le Bon, Rhodes, John Taylor and guitarist Warren Cuccurullo. “I remember it very distinctly,” she recalls of their meeting. “I came to their hotel and they were in a huge suite and they were doing a photo shoot with Weekly entertainment. I think my mom bought me a SYMS costume. (Laughs) I didn’t know anything about being cool. I had a green Kerropi backpack, that gigantic, ill-fitting haired costume from SYMS. And they would say, “It’s amazing!” (Laughs) And that’s how it started. I was traveling with them the following month and they picked me up. That was it.”

She adds, “They far exceeded my expectations because I worked with a lot of bands when I was working at Left Bank. Some of them were awesome, and some of them were total divas, total jerks. Duran Duran has never been like this.

This year marked the 40th anniversary of Duran Duran’s self-titled debut album, and the group’s masterpiece. Rio will also hit the big 4-0 in 2022. As indicated by the positive reception at Future Past, Duran Duran has long transcended their teenage idol status as the “Fab Five” (Le Bon, Rhodes, John Taylor, Roger Taylor and original guitarist Andy Taylor) to become an influential band for future generations of rock bands. and pop. “With Duran Duran, in the beginning you had five very unique looks and unique personalities,” says Krassner. “They didn’t look alike at all. They each offered something different, and I think that is still true to this day. They each bring something new to the table, they are still very attached to Duran Duran, making new music, staying current and true to what they intended to do 40 years ago. I can’t think of another band from their time that stayed together all the time and continued to put out great music.

Beyond professional association, Krassner’s relationship with band members is also personal. “Which is also really rewarding for me as a parent [is] my kids are kinda coming for the ride. My son is a drummer and every time they rehearse in New York John and Roger talk to him about music and play with him. They are really just encouraging. Nick is my son’s godfather. They are all so good for my children. It’s such a family at this point.

WOW! can be heard on SiriusXM Volume (channel 106) every Wednesday at 9 p.m. ET, and rebroadcast at 3 p.m. and 10 p.m. on Saturday and 2 p.m. on Sunday.

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Suspected massacre in Myanmar village highlights bitter struggle https://colinmarshallradio.com/suspected-massacre-in-myanmar-village-highlights-bitter-struggle/ Wed, 08 Dec 2021 17:09:34 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/suspected-massacre-in-myanmar-village-highlights-bitter-struggle/ [ad_1] BANGKOK (AP) – Outrage spread through social media in Myanmar on Wednesday over images and reports of the alleged killings and arson of 11 villagers captured by government troops in the country’s northwest . Photos and video of charred corpses in the village of Done Taw in the Sagaing region circulated widely on Tuesday. […]]]>


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BANGKOK (AP) – Outrage spread through social media in Myanmar on Wednesday over images and reports of the alleged killings and arson of 11 villagers captured by government troops in the country’s northwest .

Photos and video of charred corpses in the village of Done Taw in the Sagaing region circulated widely on Tuesday. They were reportedly taken away shortly after the men were killed and their bodies set on fire.

The hardware could not be independently verified. An account given to the Associated Press by a person who said he visited the scene generally matched descriptions of the incident broadcast by Myanmar’s independent media.

The government has not commented on the allegations. If confirmed, they would be the latest atrocity in an increasingly bitter struggle after the military seized power in February and the ousting of Aung San Suu Kyi’s elected government.

The takeover initially met with non-violent street protests, but after police and soldiers used lethal force against protesters, violence escalated as opponents of the military regime took up arms to defend themselves.

The witness who spoke to the AP, who described himself as a farmer and activist and requested anonymity for his own safety, said about 50 soldiers entered Done Taw village around 11 a.m. Tuesday, grabbing anyone who failed to escape. .

“They arrested 11 innocent villagers,” said the witness, who added that the captured men were not members of the locally organized People’s Defense Forces, which sometimes engages the army in combat. He said the captives had their hands tied behind them and were set on fire.

He gave no reason for the aggression of the soldiers. Burmese media accounts said they appeared to have acted in retaliation for an attack earlier in the morning by members of the People’s Defense Forces.

Other witnesses quoted in Burmese media said the victims were members of a defense force, although the witness who spoke to the PA described them as members of a protection group of less formally organized village.

There is resistance activity in the cities and the countryside, but the fighting is most deadly in rural areas where the army can deploy greater force against its targets. In recent months, the struggle has been fiercest in Sagaing and other parts of the northwest.

The alleged incident has been strongly criticized by Myanmar’s underground government of national unity, which has established itself as the country’s alternative administrative body in place of the military government.

“On December 7 in the Sagaing region, sickening scenes reminiscent of the Islamic State terrorist group witnessed the escalation of their terrorist acts by the military,” organization spokesman Dr Sasa said. in a press release.

“The sheer brutality, savagery and cruelty of these acts show a new depth of depravity and prove that, despite the pretext of the relative easing observed in recent months, the junta never intended to defuse its campaign of violence, ”said Sasa, who uses only one name.

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Charitable fundraising for other nonprofits on GivingTuesday https://colinmarshallradio.com/charitable-fundraising-for-other-nonprofits-on-givingtuesday/ Tue, 30 Nov 2021 19:10:44 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/charitable-fundraising-for-other-nonprofits-on-givingtuesday/ [ad_1] GivingTuesday, the annual fundraising blitz on the Tuesday after Thanksgiving, turns 10 this year. What started as a social media hashtag to counter aggressive consumer advertising campaigns with charitable donations has now grown into a juggernaut. Charities raised an estimated $ 2.47 billion from U.S. donors on GivingTuesday last year, in addition to the […]]]>


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GivingTuesday, the annual fundraising blitz on the Tuesday after Thanksgiving, turns 10 this year. What started as a social media hashtag to counter aggressive consumer advertising campaigns with charitable donations has now grown into a juggernaut. Charities raised an estimated $ 2.47 billion from U.S. donors on GivingTuesday last year, in addition to the $ 503 million they raised on GivingTuesdayNow, the special day of May 5 to raise US dollars. emergency to meet the needs of the pandemic.

This year, however, some fundraisers fear that donors no longer feel the same urgency to give as they did in 2020.

Even though charities aren’t raising as much as they did last year, Niely Shams, president of nonprofit solutions at marketing firm Data Axle, says she still expects donation day to be a sensation. . “Every year it gets bigger and bigger,” she says. Shams credits the growing mastery of fundraising strategies for attracting donors via email, social media and SMS.

Fundraisers are now spending months strategizing to attract donors before and on the day of the donation, says Asha Curran, who co-founded the event in 2012. Curran now heads the nonprofit GivingTuesday, which hosts the countryside.

This year, donors should expect to see more charities with similar missions coming together to appeal for support and raise awareness of their causes, Curran said. The National Center for Family Philanthropy, for example, is running family foundations across the country as part of a social media campaign to highlight charities that are making an impact in their local communities. Volunteer efforts such as peer support networks also benefit from the day, joining a campaign that is typically the purview of nonprofits. Local group Pandemic of Love and Mutual Aid Hub map resource will be posting on social media with #MutualAidGT to share stories about how self-help meets community needs and advances the missions of nonprofits.

The nearly 300 joint campaigns signal a change in GivingTuesday, according to Curran. “It really has become an exercise in citizen participation,” she says.

Some nonprofits whose donor numbers increased over the past year are using GivingTuesday as an opportunity to thank their pandemic donors. Over the past week, the Center for Disaster Philanthropy posted notes of gratitude on its website and social media, thanking donors, staff, clients, grant recipients and others for their partnership.

“The hope is that this also reminds people of the good job we do and the good philanthropic partners we can be,” says Devin Mathias, director of development for the charity, which coordinates the disaster relief grants. disaster and helps guide donors in giving.

Foundations and corporations previously provided the bulk of the Center for Disaster Philanthropy revenue. But last year saw an increase of about 300 percent in individual donors. During Gratitude Week, Mathias aims to show these new donors the difference they have made and inspire them to give GivingTuesday again.

The Mid-Ohio Food Collective, a food bank, has also seen donations skyrocket during the pandemic. But the charity plans to focus on giving thanks rather than appeals on GivingTuesday. Because the event falls after the Hunger Action Month in September and on the cusp of the year-end fundraising campaign, the food bank typically does not join the action on GivingTuesday, said. Matt Habash, general manager of the association. Instead, he’s hosting his own Giving Day on December 15 with a matching challenge. Last year, the one-day campaign raised $ 3.7 million.

Some fundraisers aren’t convinced the dollars earned on GivingTuesday are worth it. Nikkia Johnson, senior development officer at the Legal Aid Justice Center, says small nonprofits in particular are not seeing the benefits. She remembers her disappointment when, in previous fundraising work for a small nonprofit, her meticulously planned GivingTuesday campaign grossed less than $ 5,000.

Rather than following the crowd, charities should analyze whether the donations earned on GivingTuesday are worth the hours they spent planning, says Timothy Winkler, managing director of Winkler Group, a fundraising consultancy. Consultants at the firm are also concerned that the rush of GivingTuesday will encourage fundraisers to focus more on creating an appeal that stands out rather than developing a strategy to retain donors from the day of the donation to the fundraiser. long term.

“Donor retention is one of the most pressing issues facing nonprofits today. The retention rates are just terrible, ”says Jessica Browning, executive vice president of the Winkler Group. “GivingTuesday only exacerbates this problem.”

Johnson, along with the Legal Aid Justice Center, is also concerned that GivingTuesday will instigate a sense of competition, pitting nonprofits against each other. This is a far cry from the values ​​of equity and inclusion that many nonprofits espouse. Instead of asking for contributions, his organization will use GivingTuesday to send emails and post on social media the work of three partner nonprofits.

“We’re really trying to keep it simple,” Johnson says. “This is the first year that we’ve really tried to think about how to be fair and community-centered on GivingTuesday.”

Other nonprofits ask their donors to support other charities. The YMCA of Ann Arbor, for example, will appeal for donations to its YMCA sisters in Haiti, the Philippines and South Dakota.

Over the past decade, GivingTuesday has become the informal kickoff of the year-end fundraising season. This is the case of Unicef ​​USA, which has planned a series of in-person and virtual events across the country to celebrate its 75th anniversary. Events will feature a short film on UNICEF’s work to reduce child poverty and promote children’s health, education and well-being. In-person events in particular attract donors who make large contributions. A single ticket for the virtual event costs $ 200; tickets for an in-person event start at $ 1,500. The association also runs email and social media campaigns to attract a wider audience of donors.

Curran, of GivingTuesday, says the day puts charitable giving first in people’s minds. And while some people complain about the avalanche of calls flooding their inboxes, Curran says the volume is no worse than the ads consumers receive before Black Friday and Cyber ​​Monday.

Despite the whirlwind of activity, GivingTuesday “still works for individual organizations,” Curran said. “We really urge organizations not to retreat because they think they are going to get lost in the noise,” she said. “It’s a day when people are looking for organizations to support. “

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This article was provided to The Associated Press by the Chronicle of Philanthropy. Emily Haynes is a writer for The Chronicle. Email: emily.haynes@philanthropy.com. The AP and The Chronicle receive support from the Lilly Endowment for coverage of philanthropy and nonprofit organizations. The AP and the Chronicle are solely responsible for all content. For all of AP’s philanthropic coverage, visit https://apnews.com/hub/philanthropy.

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