united states – Colin Marshall Radio http://colinmarshallradio.com/ Fri, 25 Mar 2022 14:18:17 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://colinmarshallradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-1-1-120x120.png united states – Colin Marshall Radio http://colinmarshallradio.com/ 32 32 Missouri radio station still airs Kremlin programming, even as Russia invades Ukraine https://colinmarshallradio.com/missouri-radio-station-still-airs-kremlin-programming-even-as-russia-invades-ukraine/ Wed, 16 Mar 2022 10:18:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/missouri-radio-station-still-airs-kremlin-programming-even-as-russia-invades-ukraine/ Tune in to 11:40 a.m. or 102.9 FM in Kansas City and you might hear Jarmarl Thomas pontificate about the motives behind the Russian invasion of Ukraine on his show Fault Lines. The week of March 7, Thomas spent much of the three-hour show painting Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy as the instigator of the Russian […]]]>

Tune in to 11:40 a.m. or 102.9 FM in Kansas City and you might hear Jarmarl Thomas pontificate about the motives behind the Russian invasion of Ukraine on his show Fault Lines.

The week of March 7, Thomas spent much of the three-hour show painting Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy as the instigator of the Russian invasion, blaming the Ukrainians and the United States.

“Zelenskyy is not the overflowing, brilliant hero that the West made him out to be,” Thomas said. “It’s the narrative that’s needed to solidify that idea, it’s unprovoked.”

Fault Lines is a show featured on Radio Sputnik, broadcast programming produced in Washington DC and funded by the Kremlin. The show airs regularly on KCXL, a small station in Liberty, Missouri, which can be heard for miles in all directions.

Radio Sputnik’s account of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine stands in stark contrast to most reporting on the ongoing conflict, portrayed largely as an unprovoked attack on Ukrainians led by Russian President Vladimir Putin.

KCXL and Washington DC station WZHF-AM Air Radio Sputnik daily. A handful of other stations also pick up these broadcasts.

    Pete Schartel says he fulfilled a childhood dream when he bought his first <a class=radio station in 1994.” srcset=”https://npr.brightspotcdn.com/dims4/default/1dd37ae/2147483647/strip/true/crop/1760×1174+0+0/resize/1760×1174!/quality/90/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fnpr.brightspotcdn.com%2F24%2Fe5%2Fb847ab804754a94ddce5eea1bf69%2Fschartel-sputnik-haxel.jpg 2x” width=”880″ height=”587″ src=”https://npr.brightspotcdn.com/dims4/default/e5757e3/2147483647/strip/true/crop/1760×1174+0+0/resize/880×587!/quality/90/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fnpr.brightspotcdn.com%2F24%2Fe5%2Fb847ab804754a94ddce5eea1bf69%2Fschartel-sputnik-haxel.jpg” loading=”lazy” bad-src=”data:image/svg+xml;base64,PHN2ZyB4bWxucz0iaHR0cDovL3d3dy53My5vcmcvMjAwMC9zdmciIHZlcnNpb249IjEuMSIgaGVpZ2h0PSI1ODdweCIgd2lkdGg9Ijg4MHB4Ij48L3N2Zz4=”/>

Pete Schartel says he fulfilled a childhood dream when he bought his first radio station in 1994.

As the Russian invasion of Ukraine rages on, scrutiny from Kremlin-sponsored media like Radio Sputnik continues to intensify. And for KCXL owner Pete Schartel, that scrutiny comes in the form of renewed pressure to stop airing programs that keep the radio station going.

Since the beginning of the Russian invasion, companies around the world have regularly ceased their relations with Russia. Roku and DirecTV last week, Russian state-controlled RT, formerly known as Russia Today, was dropped. This prompted RT to close its US branch and lay off most US staff.

In Russia, outlets like CNN and the New York Times withdraw journalists from the country following a censorship law signed by Putin that threatens up to 15 years in prison for spreading “false information”.

“Extremely Unusual”

Earlier this month, in response to the invasion, National Association of Broadcasters (NAB) chief executive Curtis LeGeyt called on all U.S. broadcasters to cease all state-sponsored programming with ties to the Russian government.

NAB’s chief legal officer, Rick Kaplan, said the move was “extremely unusual” but necessary.

He said the broadcasts produced by Radio Sputnik amounted to nothing more than propaganda that disseminated misinformation from a foreign government about the invasion of the United States.

“It’s different from the discourse, which is very important to have — open, all points of view on the table. There’s a line between that and direct propaganda.”

Rick Kaplan, National Association of Broadcasters

“[There’s] there’s a lot of misinformation going on, generally speaking, in our country and around the world – I think that’s an important statement.

Schartel called NAB’s request a “gut reaction” that trampled on KCXL’s freedom of speech and led to a maelstrom of angry calls to the station, calling Schartel and his wife Jonne “traitors.”

“If I did (cut the program), we would be doing exactly the main thing that we criticize the former Soviet Union and other communist regimes for doing where they don’t allow free speech,” Schartel said. .

And it’s not just free speech that worries Schartel. He said that without the monthly revenue from the deal with Radio Sputnik, the station would probably not be able to stay open.

In exchange for airing Radio Sputnik’s programs, Schartel earns $5,000 a month to air six hours of Radio Sputnik in two blocks, 6 a.m. to 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. daily at 11:40 a.m. 102.9 FM and 104.7 FM.

“Something We Could Live With”

Ahead of the 2020 deal with the Russian government, Schartel said he was struggling to keep his small radio station on the air on a shoestring budget.

“It felt like something we could live with,” Schartel said. “Especially if they could pay us and keep the rest of the station on the air.”

U.S. Justice Department Foreign Agents Registration Act (FARA) filings show RM Broadcasting paid Schartel’s company more than $160,000 to carry Radio Sputnik programming over the past two years .

Arnold Ferolito of Florida-based RM Broadcasting brokered the deal between Rossiya Segodnya, a Kremlin-run media agency in Russia, and KCXL in 2020.

In 2017, Ferlito brokered a similar deal with WZHF-AM and unsuccessfully purchased programming from stations in larger markets like New York and Los Angeles.

Two years later, as investigations continued into foreign influence in the 2016 election, the Justice Department ordered Ferolito to register as a foreign agent with FARA.

Congress first passed FARA in 1938 to combat Nazi propaganda in the run-up to World War II.

At the time, Ferolito told KCUR 89.3 that he was a businessman “caught in the middle of a political problem.” He fought the Justice Department’s order in court without success.

After U.S. District Court Judge Robin L. Rosenberg upheld the ruling, the Justice Department said in a statement that the information Ferolito and RM Broadcasting transmitted to the U.S. airwaves lacked transparency.

“The American people have a right to know if a foreign flag is flying behind speech broadcast in the United States,” the statement said. “Our concern is not the content of the speech but the transparency of the true identity of the speaker.

Yet Ferolito continues to profit from the agreements between Rossiya Segodnya and the radio stations, as long as the stations continue to broadcast Radio Sputnik. According to documents filed by FARA, Ferolito earned a small percentage of the more than $1.6 million the Russian government paid to KCXL and WZFH.

Ferolito did not give an interview to the Midwest Newsroom, but in a statement, RM Broadcasting “stands with Ukraine and the victims of oppression and aggression around the world” and argued that shutting down Radio Sputnik’s programming in the United States would be a blow to freedom of expression.

“Alternative Radio”

Radio Sputnik isn’t the only controversial programming on KCXL, due to what Schartel has said is his love of “alternative radio.”

KCXL also airs TruNews, a show The Anti-Defamation League says regularly features anti-Semitic, Islamophobic and anti-LGBTQ messages and in 2018 Schartel gave airtime to Steve West, a Clay County Republican candidate for the Missouri House of Representatives who was denounced by his party and family for espousing bigotry.

The station has supporters like Kevin Phillips, a KCXL listener for 20 years.

The self-proclaimed conspiracy researcher said he was listening because Schartel airs programs that other stations avoid.

“Whenever people tried to get their news out there and couldn’t be heard anywhere else, he (Pete) would give them space on the air,” Phillips said. “Pete never limited the topics.”

Phillips said he gets a good deal of his news from sources such as Radio Sputnik and RT. He said he didn’t mind the Russian programming funding.

“If you’ve been following Ukraine’s history for 20 years like me, you’ll find a lot more truth on Russian pay radio than on American radio,” Phillips said.

Schartel plans to continue broadcasting Radio Sputnik shows for as long as they are available, but his contract with RM Broadcasting and Rossiya Segodnya ends in December 2022. He does not expect it to be renewed.

This story comes from the Midwest Newsroom, an investigative reporting collaboration including IPR, KCUR 89.3, Nebraska Public Media News, St. Louis Public Radio and NPR.

Copyright 2022 KCUR 89.3

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Democrats rally to chart medium-term strategy as inflation rises https://colinmarshallradio.com/democrats-rally-to-chart-medium-term-strategy-as-inflation-rises/ Sat, 12 Mar 2022 16:07:06 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/democrats-rally-to-chart-medium-term-strategy-as-inflation-rises/ President Biden didn’t mince words on Friday when he addressed members of the House Democratic Caucus, punctuating a two-day conference in Philadelphia to strategize for the midterm elections. “This off-year election, in my view, could be the most important off-year election in modern history,” he said. “We know the fundamental change that will happen if […]]]>

President Biden didn’t mince words on Friday when he addressed members of the House Democratic Caucus, punctuating a two-day conference in Philadelphia to strategize for the midterm elections.

“This off-year election, in my view, could be the most important off-year election in modern history,” he said. “We know the fundamental change that will happen if we lose the House and the Senate. The only thing I will have then is a veto pen.”

The political fate of House Democrats is tied to Biden, whose administration faces record inflation and drastic increase in gas prices while the United States tries to harm the Russian economy because of its invasion of Ukraine.

Most political bettors, along with even some Democratic lawmakers, expect the historic midterm election trend to continue this fall: the ruling party will lose seats.

At the conference, Democrats strategized on ways to prevent the long-awaited Republican red wave.

One method, said Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney, DN.Y., is to “speak like real people” and pass what he calls the “Maloney Brothers Test.”

“If you come home for Thanksgiving and your brothers think you look like a jerk, you know, ‘What’s your GPA?’ — it doesn’t matter to them,” he said. “You have to show up and be a human being in your relationship with voters.”

Maloney, who calls himself a “player-coach”, is himself at risk of re-election this fall. Already, Republicans are running an ad in his district telling voters that Maloney and Biden “have crippled America’s energy production.”

Another Democrat in a purple seat, Rep. Susan Wild of Pennsylvania, skipped the conference with the president in her home state. She told NPR ahead of the annual policy retreat that she instead travels to her district to speak to voters on issues such as rising gas prices. “I have a lot of work to do there.”

She added, “I need to talk about what we’re doing to make sure the shortages we’re seeing in grocery stores and that sort of thing are addressed.”

Wild said she could point to various legislative victories – such as the $1 trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill – but thinks his own party erred in promising a sweeping social spending bill, which blocked.

“It’s always a problem when over-promised, and I think there was a problem with some things being over-promised,” she said.

Rep. Pramila Jayapal of Washington, who chairs the Congressional Progressive Caucus, disagrees.

“I don’t understand the over-promising thing. Elections are won on people who believe in your vision,” she said.

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It’s a reminder that the disconnect between centrists and progressives — who couldn’t agree on the price of Biden’s signature legislative package — is still very real.

“I think it’s not that we have to be able to achieve every piece of our vision, but we have to understand the pain that people are facing and we have to show that we’re working on it and that we’re trying. to do so,” Jayapal said.

Democratic lawmakers across the political spectrum have stressed that Democrats need to remind voters of what they have been doing — things like the COVID-19 relief and infrastructure bills — instead of getting bogged down in process arguments on other agenda items that have been stalled.

Rep. Maxine Waters, D-California, pushed back against the idea that African-American voters who helped Biden and the Democrats win in 2020 might not run in 2022 because they’re disappointed Congress didn’t passed no suffrage or police reform legislation.

“I don’t want anyone to think that somehow the projections made by the talking heads and the press about the bad situation we’re in [are accurate]“, Waters said, insisting that black voters will run again because they understand what is at stake in the upcoming election.

Searching for Biden for Executive Orders

Without much time to pass major legislation ahead of the midterm elections and an acknowledgment that they don’t have the votes to get things done, Democrats said they were pivoting to push Biden to push through reforms. immigration, voting rights and efforts to reduce costs through executive orders.

“It’s very important that the executive act if we can’t get legislative action right away,” House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said, noting that the Emancipation Proclamation was an executive order.

“Many of us have encouraged the president to do the important research that is needed and to use this method to help jump-start the recovery,” added Rep. Jim Clyburn, DS.C., a longtime Biden ally. .

Pump pain

Democrats at the conference repeatedly acknowledged the strain rising gas prices are causing their constituents, but argued it was a sacrifice worth making to help the Ukraine to fight the Russian invasion.

“I ask the people of the United States to make the sacrifice as well, because in the long run democracy is at stake,” said Rep. Gregory Meeks, DN.Y., who chairs the House Foreign Affairs Committee and recently returned. of a trip to the Polish-Ukrainian border.

Rep. Hakeem Jeffries, chairman of the House Democratic Caucus, said at a time when people are grappling with inflation, his party needs to talk about what it has done and what it still wants to do.

“President Biden and House Democrats have a track record and a plan for progress. It’s important to talk about both,” he said. “Because if we can’t anchor our plan for progress in the reality that we’ve actually delivered real results for the American people, then there’s no reason for the American people to believe that we’ll continue to advance the things in his name.”

He does not hesitate to make a prediction for November:

“I think we’ll keep the majority in 2022 and maybe even expand it,” he told NPR.

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Melody Walker, public radio producer and STLPR reporter, dies https://colinmarshallradio.com/melody-walker-public-radio-producer-and-stlpr-reporter-dies/ Fri, 11 Mar 2022 23:26:07 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/melody-walker-public-radio-producer-and-stlpr-reporter-dies/ Longtime public radio journalist and producer, wonderful friend, loving mother, sister and partner Melody Walker died of cancer at home on March 4. She was 62 and lived in the Central West End neighborhood of St. Louis. Walker comes from several generations of pioneering Midwestern journalists and editors. She began reporting at the age of […]]]>

Longtime public radio journalist and producer, wonderful friend, loving mother, sister and partner Melody Walker died of cancer at home on March 4.

She was 62 and lived in the Central West End neighborhood of St. Louis.

Walker comes from several generations of pioneering Midwestern journalists and editors. She began reporting at the age of 10 for her father, Hayes Walker III, who published the cattle magazine, The Hereford Journal.

She became a radio journalist in Kansas City at age 16.

Walker graduated from Barnard College with a degree in philosophy and, as a student, was invited by CBS veteran Fred Friendly to work with him on a PBS series. She ran the news department for WKCR, Columbia University’s radio station, overseeing a team of 40 reporters. She’s done everything from covering the United Nations General Assembly to producing live jazz shows from clubs in the Morningside Heights neighborhood.

Walker has had a distinctive and award-winning career in public radio. As soon as she graduated from Barnard, she brought her fluency in French and her journalism skills to Europe.

As a reporter for NPR in France, Walker covered a series of terrorist attacks in Paris in the 1980s.

In the early 1980s, Walker reported from Paris for NPR, Deutsche Welle and Radio France, among others. She has covered the terrorist attacks, French politics, the champagne trade, the 40th anniversary of D-Day and the Cannes Film Festival.

There, she was discovered by a film producer and chosen to play Joan of Arc in a TV movie. Walker has also produced various jazz and classical concerts in the United States and Europe for distribution by Ofreidia, a French production company.

031122_provided_melodywalker_06.jpeg

Walker produced the “Lenny Lopate Show” at the WNYC and also covered political stories as a reporter.

Walker returned to the United States and became lead producer for the “Lenny Lopate Show” at the WNYC.

In 1989, she was hired as New York and later Chicago bureau chief for the public radio business program “Marketplace.” During this time she had her two children, Kyle and Blair, whom she later raised in Chicago, Paris, New York and St. Louis.

031122_provided_melodywalker_07.jpeg

Walker in the summer of 2021 with his partner, John Barth (left), daughter, Blair O’Brien (center left) and son, Kyle O’Brien.

“Melody was a gifted reporter with great storytelling skills and a sense of humor that made the eyes and ears of all who enjoyed her reporting shine,” recalls “Marketplace” founding executive producer Jim Russell. “I remember best his colorful reporting from France – hearing him was almost as good as being there yourself.”

Walker also wrote and produced commentary for renowned CBS Radio personality Charles Osgood. She was proud of her one-on-one interviews with Amazon’s Jeff Bezos; Thomas Watson, then CEO of IBM, and publisher Malcolm Forbes.

In St. Louis, Walker handled marketing communications for St. Louis University and Washington University’s Olin Business School.

She returned to public radio briefly in 2018 as a business and economic development reporter for St. Louis Public Radio.

Melody Walker wears red glasses and large over-ear headphones and speaks into a St. Louis Public Radio microphone in a radio studio.

Evie Hemphill

/

St. Louis Public Radio

Walker, a former economic development reporter for St. Louis Public Radio, joined “St. Louis on the Air” as a guest in November 2018.

She balanced her professional accomplishments with civic duty. Walker has served as an officer and board member of the Central West End Association and STL Village, an on-site seniors service and advocacy organization.

Walker loved France and all things French, Halloween, dinner parties, perfect croissants, champagne, the Missouri Botanical Garden, tending his own garden and greenhouse, spying on bunnies and butterflies. She was happier in Paris and New York.

She is survived by her two children, Kyle Walker O’Brien of Paris and Blair Walker O’Brien of Manhattan; his partner, John Barth of St. Louis; his mother, Claudette; and his sister, Hayley, and brother-in-law Jack Rees of Kansas City. And also Cooper, from Manhattan, the only dog ​​she ever loved.

His family says loved ones can honor his life by making donations to Village STL or the Missouri Botanical Garden.

A celebration of Walker’s life will be held in June.

This recollection was written by John Barth, partner of Melody Walker and veteran of public and commercial radio.

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South Koreans vote for political conservative as new president https://colinmarshallradio.com/south-koreans-vote-for-political-conservative-as-new-president/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/south-koreans-vote-for-political-conservative-as-new-president/ SEOUL — South Korean voters have chosen a politically inexperienced conservative as president, in the country’s tightest race. Yoon Suk Yeol has promised a tougher line on North Korea and a closer alliance with the United States Yoon, 61, of the conservative People’s Power Party, beat Liberal ruling party candidate Lee Jae-myung by less than […]]]>

SEOUL — South Korean voters have chosen a politically inexperienced conservative as president, in the country’s tightest race. Yoon Suk Yeol has promised a tougher line on North Korea and a closer alliance with the United States

Yoon, 61, of the conservative People’s Power Party, beat Liberal ruling party candidate Lee Jae-myung by less than 1 percent. It was the eighth presidential election since democratic elections resumed in 1987 after decades of military rule. Voter turnout, at 77%, was similar to the last vote five years ago.

The president-elect’s promise to crack down on North Korea could mark a sharp break with the policies of the outgoing liberal administration.

“I will provide a principled and determined response to North Korea’s illegal and unreasonable actions, but I will always keep the door open for inter-Korean dialogue,” Yoon said Thursday during his first press conference as president-elect.

Again, Yoon faces many constraints at home. The Democratic Party still holds the majority in parliament and public opinion is deeply divided. In addition to long-standing ideological and geographic divisions, the election outcome also highlighted diverging views among generations and genres.

Incumbent President Moon Jae-in has held three summits with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, but negotiations have stalled since an abortive summit between Kim and then-President Donald Trump in Hanoi in 2019.

Yoon said South Korea should conduct a preventive investigation strike against North Korea, if a nuclear attack were imminent.

The Moon administration called for a declaration ending the 1950-1953 Korean War, in order to entice North Korea to return to the negotiating table. But Yoon made it clear that Pyongyang needs to step up efforts towards denuclearization, before receiving security guarantees or economic aid.

Rather than dangling incentives for dialogue, the new administration “will try to increase deterrence and close coordination through the U.S.-Korea alliance”, said Chung Kuyounpolitical scientist at Kangwon National University. [the Republic of Korea, or ROK, is South Korea’s formal name] “So that creates a very different dynamic on the Korean peninsula.”

North Korea has conducted nine missile tests so far this year. The United States Office of the Director of National Intelligence noted in a Monday report that said Pyongyang may be preparing to resume testing of atomic bombs and intercontinental ballistic missiles for the first time since 2017.

Some experts, however, believe Pyongyang’s plans to modernize its nuclear arsenal began about three years ago and have a longer timeline.

During the election campaign, Yoon also critical President Moon’s approach to Beijing is too accommodating, especially given the rise of anti-China sentiment in South Korea.

He suggested deploying additional American-made Terminal High Altitude Area Defense, or THAAD, batteries. missilewhich China vehemently opposes.

And Yoon suggested a greater level of cooperation with the Quadrilateral Security Dialogue, also known as the “Quad,” a group that includes the United States, Japan, India and Australia, and which Beijing considers as a hostile bloc led by the United States.

During his press conference, Yoon only mentioned building a “relationship of mutual respect” with Beijing and a “future-oriented” relationship with Tokyo.

Seoul and Tokyo have seen their ties hit rock bottom as historic disputes over the history of World War II morphed into broader disputes over trade and security ties. These frictions have been a major headache for Washington as it tries to tighten its network of allies in Asia to take on China.

On the home front, Yoon has sparked controversy with her promise to abolish the country’s Ministry of Gender Equality and Family. The platform was seen as an angling for the votes of disgruntled young male voters, who blame their economic insecurity on feminists and affirmative action for women. Young swing voters make up about a third of eligible voters.

South Korean media polls show around two-thirds of men in their 20s voted for Yoon, while around two-thirds of women in their 20s voted for Lee Jae-myung, the biggest disparity among all. age groups.

With soaring house prices top voters’ list of blame, Yoon vowed to build more homes and cut real estate taxes.

In metropolitan Seoul, where apartment prices have roughly doubled under the Moon administration to an average of $1 million, Yoon won the most votes where property prices are highest. students. About two-thirds of voters in the capital’s posh Gangnam district followed Yoon, compared to half of voters citywide.

Se Eun Gong of NPR in Seoul contributed to this report.

Copyright 2022 NPR. To see more, visit .

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North Korea fires another suspected ballistic missile at sea https://colinmarshallradio.com/north-korea-fires-another-suspected-ballistic-missile-at-sea/ Sat, 05 Mar 2022 02:51:00 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/north-korea-fires-another-suspected-ballistic-missile-at-sea/ SEOUL, South Korea — North Korea fired a suspected ballistic missile into the sea on Saturday, according to its neighbors’ military, apparently extending its round of weapons tests this year amid a prolonged freeze in nuclear talks with United States. South Korea’s Joint Chiefs of Staff said it detected a single launch of a suspected […]]]>

SEOUL, South Korea — North Korea fired a suspected ballistic missile into the sea on Saturday, according to its neighbors’ military, apparently extending its round of weapons tests this year amid a prolonged freeze in nuclear talks with United States.

South Korea’s Joint Chiefs of Staff said it detected a single launch of a suspected ballistic missile from an area near the North Korean capital of Pyongyang into the country’s eastern waters, but it did not immediately specified the distance traveled by the weapon. The Japanese Ministry of Defense has also assessed the weapon as potentially ballistic.

The Japanese Coast Guard warned ships that an object they described as a potential ballistic missile may have landed in waters between the Korean Peninsula and Japan, but no damage was reported in the immediate.

South Korea’s presidential office said national security adviser Suh Hoon would chair an emergency meeting of the National Security Council to discuss the launch. There was no immediate comment on the launch from the US government or the military.

It was North Korea’s ninth round of weapons launches in 2022, as it continues to use a pause in diplomacy to expand its military capabilities while trying to pressure the Biden administration to secure concessions.

The launch came as South Koreans lined up at polling stations on Saturday morning to participate in early voting ahead of next Wednesday’s presidential election. The vote follows months of bitter campaigning in which the two main candidates have clashed over whether South Korea should continue its engagement with the belligerent North or take a harder line to control its nuclear threat. .

The latest launch came about a week after South Korea and Japan said they detected the North firing a ballistic missile on Sunday that traveled about 300 kilometers (190 miles) at a peak altitude of around 600 kilometers (370 miles). The North later said the launch was designed to test a camera system it planned to install on a spy satellite under development.

The North’s other tests this year included a purported hypersonic missile and its first launch since 2017 of an intermediate-range missile potentially capable of reaching Guam, a major US military hub in the Pacific.

Analysts say North Korea could up the ante in the coming months and possibly resume testing of major weapons like intercontinental ballistic missiles as it tries to move the needle with Washington, which is now concerned about the invasion of Ukraine by Russia and regional competition with China.

At a conference of the ruling Workers’ Party convened by North Korean leader Kim Jong Un last month, members of the Politburo made a veiled threat to resume testing of nuclear devices and ICBMs, which Kim had unilaterally suspended in 2018 to make way for diplomacy with then-President Donald. Asset.

But negotiations continue to be derailed after Trump and Kim’s failed second meeting in February 2019, when the Americans rejected North Korea’s demands for major sanctions relief in exchange for dismantling a nuclear facility. aging, which would have represented a partial surrender of its nuclear capabilities.

The Biden administration has offered open-ended talks with Pyongyang, but has shown no willingness to deliver much-needed economic benefits unless the North takes real steps to reduce its nuclear weapons and missile program.

Copyright 2022 NPR. To learn more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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“The Inside Man” APR 40th Anniversary encore presentation https://colinmarshallradio.com/the-inside-man-apr-40th-anniversary-encore-presentation/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 12:11:27 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/the-inside-man-apr-40th-anniversary-encore-presentation/ Alabama Public Radio celebrates its fortieth anniversary this year. Throughout 2022, the APR news team will present encore shows from the best of the best in our award-winning national stories. Our last dates from last year. Vladimir Putin’s war on Ukraine stands in stark contrast to what parents in the former Soviet nation of Belarus […]]]>


Alabama Public Radio celebrates its fortieth anniversary this year. Throughout 2022, the APR news team will present encore shows from the best of the best in our award-winning national stories. Our last dates from last year. Vladimir Putin’s war on Ukraine stands in stark contrast to what parents in the former Soviet nation of Belarus did in 1999 and 2000. That was when parents in this former communist country trusted outsiders to Alabama to shelter their children after the Chernobyl nuclear power plant disaster in 1986. Here is a further introduction to part two of APR’s series titled “From Chernobyl, to Bama, and back.”

In April, we met with the Lee family from the town of Pelham. They took in a 9-year-old boy from the Belarusian nation in the year 2000. Belarus is just north of where the Chernobyl power plant exploded in 1986. It’s also where a lot of radioactive fallout has drifted . Alabama Public Radio and the University of Alabama Public Television Center collaborated on the story about how children from Belarus were brought to our state for visitation beginning in the late 1990s. Here’s how it all started.

“He was pretty shy around us, for quite a while,” said Susan Lee of Pelham, Alabama.

Susan Lee and Ivan Kouvalieu in the year 2000

“He was always happy. He was a boy. He had a mischievous side. But, it was still fun and happy,” Lee said of Ivan.

He was only 10 years old when he traveled to Alabama in 2000, and at that time he spoke no English. Ivan Kovaliou and kids like him flew to Alabama from the former Soviet nation of Belarus. After changing planes in Frankfurt, New York and Atlanta, they boarded buses for a two-hour journey to Birmingham.

They all look a little tired as they wave to the camera for this 20-year-old video. Everyone wears a red baseball cap. The organizers didn’t want them to get lost in the crowd waiting for them.

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Belarusian children arrive in Birmingham

When each child gets off the bus, they are greeted by families holding signs with slogans like Welcome to Alabama written in Russian. At first, the young people wearing their red caps are grouped in one group, and their host families in the other. Everyone seems a little uncertain about what’s next. Then, little by little, everyone is paired up. Instead of taking the kids, the families spread blankets on the grass near the parking lot for a picnic to get to know each other. In his case, Lee knew that Ivan had come a long way for this all-American lunch, and why.

“It wasn’t until many years later that I realized the magnitude of the disaster and the long term impact it had…and continues to have…and will continue to have…for years to come. come,” she said.

Ivan and these other young people are known as the Children of Chernobyl. About 60% of the Soviet nation of Belarus was contaminated by the nuclear power plant disaster. Thyroid cancer cases have increased tenfold in areas affected by the Chernobyl fallout. This includes young people of Ivan’s age at the time.

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The United Methodist Church created the Children of Chernobyl program in Alabama. This meant free medical care and a chance for these young people to be safe from the threat of radiation. Still, Lee said it meant a big leap of faith for Ivan’s parents to let him come.

“I don’t know if I could do that, for my kids,” Lee said. “I don’t know if I could send them somewhere without knowing someone who would have to… take care of them.” And yet his parents trusted us infinitely to be his second parents.

Church leaders in Alabama also knew it was a big ask. And they needed someone who knew Russia firsthand to lead the way.

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“As I had lived there before and been involved in different projects, I felt I could add something to that,” said Patrick Friday.

Friday was in seminary to become a Methodist minister in Alabama. But that wasn’t the only thing on his resume. Friday produced documentaries for Alabama Public Television and wrote stories for CNN. And, there was one more thing.

“I went, right out of college, with a group called Education for Democracy,” Friday said. “So my job was to be available in the Baltic countries. To help. It was still the Soviet Union. And people were interested in ‘What is democracy?’ ‘What is freedom?’

That was before the fall of communism in 1991. Today, Friday was back in the post-Soviet nation of Belarus on a more delicate mission. These tottering children may soon be heading to the United States. But on Friday, they would first have to convince their parents. Friday asked local leaders what he could do to build trust that could lead to the Children of Chernobyl program. They said to bring winter coats for the kids.

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Patrick Friday delivers coats that could participate in the Children of Chernobyl program

He shot a video in 1996 while carrying large clear plastic bags into a house. They were full of coats donated by parishioners in Alabama. First, a little girl of about 5 years old shows up. Friday rummages in his bag like a skinny young Santa Claus. He pulls out a small blue coat with a plaid lining. The little customer tries it on and responds with a smile.

An older girl, named Sasha, stays behind. She seems uncertain. Friday pulls out a black coat and holds it. He gets no reaction. More digging leads to a purple jacket with patches of green and black. Sasha seems to be warming up to this one. She tries it on and keeps it.

Many meetings and many coats later, the crowds around Friday began to swell. A local school even hosted a reception. The children were dressed in white. Their costumes are embroidered in red and green, the national colors of Belarus. And there are a lot of intros. The parents spoke on Friday about their children, where they went to school and what they like to do. Some would drop soft hints, as if he would be no problem.

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Young Belarusians perform folk songs and dances at a reception for Patrick Friday

“And that’s when we said we were looking forward to having them come to us,” Friday said, “to fly to Alabama and stay with us.”

But, despite the smiles, handshakes and songs, Friday knew a tough time was coming. It was then that these families gathered at the main airport in the Belarusian capital of Minsk to say goodbye.

“Think of your own children, say they are 7 or 8 years old, in a foreign country to people you don’t know. So that was the look on their face,” Friday said.

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Why is Black History Month important? https://colinmarshallradio.com/why-is-black-history-month-important/ Sat, 26 Feb 2022 12:54:56 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/why-is-black-history-month-important/ About 10 years ago, Shukree Hassan Tilghman tried to cancel Black History Month. Equipped with a sandwich board with the words “End of Black History Month” written across the front, he scoured the streets of New York City looking for people to sign his petition to eliminate him. To understand what Tilghman was doing, it […]]]>

About 10 years ago, Shukree Hassan Tilghman tried to cancel Black History Month.

Equipped with a sandwich board with the words “End of Black History Month” written across the front, he scoured the streets of New York City looking for people to sign his petition to eliminate him.

To understand what Tilghman was doing, it helps to know that the other side of his sign said “Black history is American history.” It also helps to know that he was filming all of this for a documentary he did,”More than a monthThis film explored an ongoing question about Black History Month; rather than highlighting the accomplishments of African Americans, does it instead maintain a segregated history of America?

“Some people think it was a stunt,” says Tilghman. In some ways it was, but it was also authentic.

Tilghman says the “main impetus” for her petition to end Black History Month was rooted in her childhood. Both of her parents were teachers, and those posters of famous black people that appeared on classroom walls and in school hallways every February were in her home year-round. When he was little, Black History Month was exciting, but since he heard the same stories of a few sanitized heroes repeating themselves one month a year, it started to feel insulting. “We were invisible for 11 months of the year, but now suddenly we were visible in February,” he says.

“What did it mean that we had Black History Month,” he began to wonder.

“And what would that mean if we didn’t?”

Why did Carter G. Woodson invent it?

Talk to any group of historians about the significance of Black History Month and they will all mention the same name: Carter G. Woodson.

“We call him the father of black history,” says Diana Ramey Berry, chair of the history department at the University of Texas at Austin.

In 1926 Woodson founded Negro History Week – which would become what we now call black history month.

“The idea was to make resources available for teachers — black teachers — to celebrate and talk about the contributions that black people had made to America,” says Karsonya Wise Whitehead, founding executive director of the Karson Institute for Race, Peace, and Social Justice at Loyola University. Whitehead is also a former secretary of ASALH – the Association for the Study of African American Life and History, which Woodson founded in 1915.

Woodson chose the week in February marked by the birth of Abraham Lincoln and the chosen birthday of Frederick Douglass, as those days were celebrated in his community. In this way, Woodson built on a black tradition that already commemorated the past.

“He also understood that for black students to see themselves beyond where they are now, they needed to be able to learn more about the contributions their ancestors had made to this country,” Whitehead said.

The historical context of the moment is also key, according to Berry. “African Americans were about 50 years out of slavery trying to find their place in the United States,” she says.

This space was violently demarcated by white supremacy. “We were living through segregation, lynchings, mass murders and massacres,” Berry says. A few years ago it was the so-called 1919 red summer, when white mobs attacked black neighborhoods and towns. Then in 1921 came the Tulsa Race Massacre.

Along with white supremacist violence was an attempt to whitewash US history, excluding both the contributions and realities of black people. It was the time when statues of Confederate soldiers were erected and the myth of the lost cause – the lie that the Civil War was about preserving a distinguished way of life and that slaves were treated well – became a dominant narrative. “Not just in the South,” says Hasan Kwame Jeffries, a history professor at Ohio State University.

“A complete revision and distortion of the Civil War, slavery, emancipation, reconstruction was deeply embedded in the American public education system,” he adds.

“Let’s Talk About Blacks”

Growing up in New York public schools in the 1980s, Jeffries says Black History Month was a lot like “let’s talk about black people for a few days.”

“It was the usual cast of characters,” he says. Martin Luther King Jr., Frederick Douglass, Harriet Tubman, a few black inventors – “and then we’d move on.”

Said Whitehead, “At school, all of a sudden it all turned black, didn’t it?”

“So you put your macaroni and cheese and your collard greens in the cafeteria. You line the halls with all this black art that would then be taken down at the end of February,” she says.

Black History Month can sometimes seem symbolic, but it’s still necessary, says Whitehead. “You can go to places,” she says, spouting the names of states, “where if you didn’t have Black History Month, there wouldn’t be any conversation.”

What we need is an inclusive and accurate American history, according to Berry. But American history remains a segregated space. “When you take American history classes, a lot of those classes are taught from the perspective of only Americans and white students,” Berry says.

The paradox of Black History Month today, says Whitehead, is that we still need it, even if it’s not enough. “We want black history to be American history,” she says. “But we understand that without Black History Month, they won’t teach it in the American history curriculum.”

Which brings us back to Tilghman and an answer to his question: what would it mean if we didn’t have Black History Month?

“If, but for Black History Month, those stories wouldn’t be told,” Tilghman says, “then we have a bigger problem that isn’t Black History Month. isn’t really a reason to maintain Black History Month.”

“It’s a reason to fight for something better than Black History Month.”

Parallels to Woodson’s time

There have been efforts in some states, and in some programs to integrate American history throughout the year, progressing slowly. But Hasan Jeffries says the moment we find ourselves in right now parallels perfectly the period in which Carter G. Woodson founded Negro History Week and January 6th. Once again, at the center of it all is a battle over who controls history.

“We see the same pushback now with these divisive topics and these divisive issues,” Jeffries says, referring to ““divisiveness” laws in Republican-led states that forbid acknowledging that America was founded on racist principles.

“If we can just take Rosa Parks out sitting on a bus and put her back on the bus without talking about it, that’s fine,” Jeffries says. “But we don’t want to talk about the society as a whole that supported and embraced Jim Crow. And how inequality is literally written into the American constitution.”

Integrating black history into American history is not a simple act of inclusion, says Jeffries. You can’t just insert black people who have invented things or made notable contributions into a timeline, he says.

“You start to have to question what you assume to be fundamental truths about the American experience, the myth of perpetual progress and American exceptionalism – it all comes crashing down,” says Jeffries.

But change is coming, he notes.

The undergraduates Jeffries teaches don’t necessarily start out with a complete understanding of United States history, but many now show up in his class precisely because they feel they haven’t been told everything. the story.

“They’ve seen all of this happen over the last four or five years – the rise of racism, white supremacy and hate,” he says of some of his white students. “And they come to college saying, okay, something’s wrong.”

Feed the appetite for a solid story

This thirst for black history, for robust American history, is something high school teacher Ernest Crim III has tapped into on social media. His tiktok videos about black characters in history have gone viral, racking up tens of thousands of views. One of these the videos were about Carter G. Woodsonand the origins of Black History Month.

Crim is a black teacher who teaches black, Latino, and white students in a Chicago suburb, which means he’s in many ways like the teachers Woodson created to serve Black History Week. “Woodson created Negro History Week for a particular purpose,” Crim explains. “So we could get together and discuss what we’ve been doing all year, not celebrate it for a week, which eventually turned into a month.”

That’s why in Crim’s history class, February isn’t the only time they talk about people of color. “In each unit of study, I look for examples of what black people and Latinos were doing at that time,” he says.

“We’ll get to my class’s civil rights unit, probably in March,” he says. “They’re going to think it’s February, with all that we’re talking about black people.”

For Crim, in teaching history, separate is not equal.

Illinois, where he teaches, has no divisiveness law, but even without an outright ban, he says many of his students don’t learn anything about systemic racism in American history. “Even though not every state bans it, it’s not necessary because most history teachers don’t do it at all,” Crim says. You don’t need to ban something that isn’t really taught in the first place.

Teaching history, teaching integrated honest history, can be transformative, says Crim. “It’s about changing your thoughts and it can change your whole generation. It can change your family. It might change, just the trajectory of your whole life,” he says.

“The story that we as Americans tell about who we were, that story tells us who we are,” says Shukree Tilghman.

Tilghman’s campaign to end Black History Month left him with a renewed respect for the rich history of the month itself. In recent years, it may seem like history has resurfaced as a battleground for American identity, but it has always been that way. “History is about power,” says Tilghman, “and who has the power to tell the story.”

Black History Month, at its best, has the ability to open the door to some sort of narrative repairs, says Hasan Jeffries. “I mean, that’s part of the power of Black History Month. It holds America accountable for the narrative it tells about the past.”

Copyright 2022 NPR. To learn more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Radio station shares bilingual news with Gorge Farmworkers / Public News Service https://colinmarshallradio.com/radio-station-shares-bilingual-news-with-gorge-farmworkers-public-news-service/ Fri, 25 Feb 2022 00:03:10 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/radio-station-shares-bilingual-news-with-gorge-farmworkers-public-news-service/ A unique radio station in the Columbia River Gorge provides news in English and Spanish, on topics ranging from the environment to immigration. Radio Tierra is a small community station in Hood River serving farm workers who are mostly from Mexico and live on both the Oregon and Washington sides. “Its purpose is to reach […]]]>

A unique radio station in the Columbia River Gorge provides news in English and Spanish, on topics ranging from the environment to immigration.

Radio Tierra is a small community station in Hood River serving farm workers who are mostly from Mexico and live on both the Oregon and Washington sides.

“Its purpose is to reach out to this community and talk about environmental and social issues that are happening in our communities, and for them to understand how climate change or environmental crisis is affecting our communities,” said Ubaldo Hernandez, host. of a broadcast on the station. called “Conoce Tu Columbia.”

Hernandez addresses a range of issues on his show, such as the effects of pesticides on health and water quality in the Columbia, and how people can get involved in the solutions to these issues. He is also the main organizer of the Columbia Riverkeeper group.

Leti Moretti, a Radio Tierra volunteer who hosted her own show, said the station provided a way for people to get involved in their community. Moretti said she would use her show to talk about topics like COVID-19 and immigration and to dispel misinformation.

“We know that information in Spanish comes much later than for the English language, and the same goes for misinformation,” she said. “To correct it, it takes about four times longer to correct in Spanish than in English, because there aren’t as many checkpoints.”

Moretti said Radio Tierra has a special relationship with the region it serves. People called on his show just to say they lost their wallet at the grocery store and needed help finding it. She said someone called once to say a family’s fridge had broken down.

“It took less than 60 minutes before someone called me and said, ‘We have a refrigerator in the back of our truck. Just let us know where we need to deliver it.’ They had an extra one in one of the orchards they delivered to this family,” she said. “So that kind of magic was really cool to see.”

Moretti said these are not all serious conversations on Radio Tierra. When a request comes in to lighten things up, the deejays are happy to oblige with some upbeat tunes.

Disclosure: Columbia Riverkeeper contributes to our fund for endangered species and wildlife, environmental, water reporting. If you would like to help support news in the public interest, click here.

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The strategy behind Russia’s sarcastic tone towards the West https://colinmarshallradio.com/the-strategy-behind-russias-sarcastic-tone-towards-the-west/ Thu, 24 Feb 2022 10:40:08 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/the-strategy-behind-russias-sarcastic-tone-towards-the-west/ President Biden said Tuesday that Russia’s decision to move troops into parts of eastern Ukraine was “the start of a Russian invasion.” Russian President Vladimir Putin doesn’t characterize it that way, but as the world watched for a possible invasion, Russia consistently used sarcasm in its messaging. At a press conference last week, Russian Foreign […]]]>

President Biden said Tuesday that Russia’s decision to move troops into parts of eastern Ukraine was “the start of a Russian invasion.”

Russian President Vladimir Putin doesn’t characterize it that way, but as the world watched for a possible invasion, Russia consistently used sarcasm in its messaging.

At a press conference last week, Russian Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova presented the idea of ​​Russia invading Ukraine as an almost trivial idea.

“Hello. Sorry for being a bit late,” Zakharova said on Feb. 16. “I was just checking whether we were invading Ukraine or not. Spoiler: we’re not.”

A sarcastic tone is a tool often used by Russian officials, including Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, who, following a meeting with his British counterpart, recently said: “I am really disappointed that this looks like a deaf talking to a blind man, etc. Basically, no one hears either one.”

The strategy behind the sarcasm is not new and has been used since Russia invaded Crimea in 2014, said Yale University history professor Timothy Snyder.

“I remember very clearly that President Putin said at the time that there were no Russian soldiers in Ukraine, and if there seemed to be any, it was just people who had bought camouflage used at a local store,” Snyder said. “It’s kind of postmodern cynicism, trying to put you on your back, trying to confuse you.”

Adopting this tone also allows Russia to assert its power by declaring what is real and what is not, while trying to be humorous, Snyder said.

“It’s like a cynical pose – ‘Nothing is true. Nothing is real. We’re bolder than you, because we’re ready to say anything, and you don’t mean anything,'” Snyder said. “But at the same time, it’s also a way to save time. It blurs things so that you spend your time trying to figure out what’s going on, rather than just looking at the simple facts on the ground.”

Snyder spoke with NPR All things Considered on how the tone of Russian diplomats compares to that of their American counterparts, the audience targeted by this sarcasm, and the strategy behind Russia’s message.

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This interview has been edited for length and clarity.


Interview Highlights

On how this sarcasm compares to the language of the Democratic West

It’s very, very different. I mean, the contrast with the Americans or with the Germans is very striking. Western diplomats are usually serious to the point of boring. And I think, especially when they’re up against the Russians, they’re trying their best to be more factual and more careful in their speaking, because they want to avoid the trap of being drawn into, you know, a some kind of comedy contest or some kind of sarcasm contest.

On whether the US should use a different tone when communicating with Russia

I think the United States uses a different tone. There is something historically new about what the United States is doing, and that is openly using intelligence to try to describe things that Russia might do. And so far they have hit the nail on the head. And that clearly took some of the fun out of the Russians. It’s hard to be sarcastic about something that the other party correctly predicts you’re going to do, you know, and then you actually do it. So I think we should probably give credit to this new development on the American side.

About who is the audience of this sarcasm

I think it’s both domestic and foreign. [Russia is] try to tell us that they are not afraid of us. They are ready to laugh at us. They try to show that they are equal to any superpower and that they can put us in our place, they can make us feel humiliated.

For domestic audiences, the message is also the same. But in this particular case, they’re also trying to tell the national audience that they really aren’t doing anything wrong. They really don’t plan to invade Ukraine. And it is important to know that at this precise moment, this is what the Russians believe. The Russians think there is no chance that their country will invade Ukraine.

On how this message affects people’s understanding of the situation

They are definitely trying to confuse you. I mean, there are two ways to do this. You can do nothing and insist that you do something, or you can do something and insist that you do nothing. And right now, they are clearly doing something. They have units that should be in Asia, which are normally there to protect against China, all over Europe. They are definitely doing something. And the combination of doing something and saying we’re not doing anything is very confusing.

Why Russia is Talking About Ethnic Cleansing, Refugee Crisis, and War Crimes When It Comes to Ukraine

Well, they must have some kind of excuse to invade. So, let’s remember, the Russian people don’t think there is an invasion plan. And therefore, the question of whether Russia should invade does not even arise. If there is going to be a major invasion, Russia needs to raise some kind of serious issue, which it can use to at least persuade its domestic voters that something is happening.

Genocide is a code word here. Genocide means World War II. And this represents concern about the future of Russians beyond Russia’s border. But what worries me about their use of the word genocide is the weird way the things they accuse others of tend to be the things they are about to do themselves.

On how the US is doing in talks with Russia

I think Americans are doing the right thing by trying everything they can. Despite all our talk of language difficulties, the Americans have done a pretty good job of anticipating what the Russians are going to say in advance and preparing us for it. So we were thrown a lot less this time around than in 2014.

I think the Americans are right that we simply cannot say for sure what, ultimately, Mr. Putin intends to do, so we should have broad-based diplomacy. We should keep trying. But you know, it’s a process. There will be no meeting or a moment when everything will change.

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First – Consensus indicates upside potential of 13.6% https://colinmarshallradio.com/first-consensus-indicates-upside-potential-of-13-6/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 14:19:17 +0000 https://colinmarshallradio.com/first-consensus-indicates-upside-potential-of-13-6/ First found using the ticker (FCF) now have 6 total analysts covering the stock. The consensus rating is “Buy”. The range between the target price high and the target price low is between 20 and 17 calculating the average target price we have 18.67. Now, with the previous closing price of 16.43, this now indicates […]]]>

First found using the ticker (FCF) now have 6 total analysts covering the stock. The consensus rating is “Buy”. The range between the target price high and the target price low is between 20 and 17 calculating the average target price we have 18.67. Now, with the previous closing price of 16.43, this now indicates that there is 13.6% upside potential. The 50-day MA is 16.34 while the 200-day moving average is 14.79. The market cap of the company is $1,547 million. You can visit the Company’s website by visiting: https://www.fcbanking.com

The potential market capitalization would be $1,758 million based on market consensus.

You can now share it on Stocktwits, just click on the logo below and add the ticker in the text to be seen.

First Commonwealth Financial Corporation, a financial holding company, provides various personal and business banking services to individuals and small and medium-sized businesses in the United States. Its consumer services include personal checking accounts, interest-bearing checking accounts, savings and health savings accounts, insured money market accounts, debit cards, investment certificates, interest rate certificates of deposit fixed and variable loans, mortgages, secured and unsecured installment loans, construction and home loans, safe deposit boxes, credit cards, lines of credit with overdraft protection, IRA accounts and automated teller machine (ATM) services ), as well as internet, mobile and telephone banking. The Company’s commercial banking services include commercial loans, business checking accounts, online account management services, payroll direct deposits, commercial cash management services and repurchase agreements, as well as ACH origination services. It also offers various trust and asset management services; auto, home and business insurance, as well as term life insurance; and annuities, mutual funds, and stock and bond brokerage services through broker and insurance brokers. As of December 31, 2020, the company operated 120 community banking offices in western and central Pennsylvania, and northeast, central, and southwest Ohio; corporate banking centers in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, as well as Columbus, Canton and Cleveland, Ohio; mortgage banking offices in Wexford, Pennsylvania, and Hudson, Westlake, as well as Lewis Center, Ohio; and 139 ATMs. First Commonwealth Financial Corporation was founded in 1934 and is headquartered in Indiana, Pennsylvania.

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